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2004 - American Sociological Association Words: 170 words || 
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1. Patel, Rajeev. and Torres, Robert. "Poverty Justifies Intellectual Property - Representations of Development and the Case for Intellectual Property in Agriculture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110494_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the effects of global intellectual property (IP) regimes have their most profound effects in the third world, decisions over these regimes are fixed in the first world. The debates preceding these decisions are contested by advocates and critics of IP alike, and both sides mobilize representations of development to buttress their cases. Comparing public discourse over IP regimes in agriculture provides an insight into the political economy not only of the agricultural industry, but also of the transnational representation of development. We examine the debates over genetically modified (GM) seeds in the U.S. and Europe, noting how third world bodies are mobilized, and how discourses of poverty are used to justify or criticize the promotion of GM seeds. By noting that the pesticide industry is the principal advocate of IP in agriculture, we are able to cast contemporary debates over IP into a longer history of intervention in, and representation of, the third world in attempts to secure hegemony over visions of sustainable agriculture, in developing countries and developed.

2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 257 words || 
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2. Sunder Rajan, Kaushik. "“Property Rights, or Property versus Rights? : Questions in the Constitution of Contemporary Indian Biomedicine”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p422635_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In this paper, I explore the problematic of “Reframing Rights” through the question of property, specifically intellectual property, in contemporary Indian biomedicine. I am interested in two articulations of rights in relation to property. The first is in the valorization of property itself in terms of rights, as seen in the current aggressive push on the part of the Indian government both to comply with WTO-mandated property regimes and to legislatively reorient the conduct of Indian science in a manner that is more conducive to the generation of intellectual property rights. The second is an opposition of property to other kinds of rights (such as right to health or right to life), which is emerging as an important form of political and legal response to property regimes in India.

The co-production of global biomedicine with global political economy brings into being forms of what Sheila Jasanoff has referred to in her Introduction to the forthcoming volume Reframing Rights as “bio-constitutionalism”. I wish in this paper to conceptually and empirically unpack an instance of the operation of bio-constitutionalism. Conceptually, I am interested in asking how the notion of “right” comes to be at stake and potentially refigured, when it becomes an instrument that both instantiates and negates property. Empirically, I am interested in the institutional forms and political discourses, ideologies and actions that are mobilized at a moment when the very value systems of science, healthcare, the state, law and advocacy are simultaneously being reframed because of new developments in the life sciences and new multilateral trade arrangements.

2011 - Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 249 words || 
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3. Kuyucu, Tuna. "Urban Transformation’ as State-Led Property Transfer: The Contradictions of Redefining Property in Istanbul’s Informal Housing Areas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Various University Venues, Barcelona, Spain, <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493131_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since 2002, the regulation of urban land/housing markets in Turkey have changed significantly. With the passage of crucial laws, the ‘populist’ mode of urbanization based on the incomplete commodification of land/housing has given way to a neo-liberal mode that no longer relies on informal markets. These new laws have accomplished two goals: The imposition of a fully capitalist property regime on ‘informal’ areas and the creation of a formal housing market for lower-middle classes in place of the gecekondu (informal housing). Through the implementation of ‘urban transformation projects’ (UTP), municipalities are now authorized to transfer ‘gecekondu’ residents into formal units built by the state and upgrade the area physically in order to attract capitalist investments. This paper argues that the construction of a neoliberal market and the imposition of a strict private property regime on informal areas are shaped by the highly ambiguous and exploitative rules that developed in the previous ‘populist’ regime of governance. As such, this neoliberal regime ends up intensifying existing inequalities among gecekondu dwellers. Moreover, the ambiguities, contradictions and malpractices that surround the construction of the new regime generate further dispossession and displacement for the poor whose ‘property’ is transferred to stronger urban actors. Field research I conducted in two ‘transformation’ areas of Istanbul demonstrates that in the absence of ‘social’ policies that accompany these authoritarian and anti-democratic interventions into informal areas, there is a serious risk of increased urban inequality and the geographical re-location of poverty in more marginal parts of the city.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 425 words || 
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4. O'Melinn, Liam. "Property without Bounds and the Recursive Conceptualization of "Intellectual Property"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: Property without Bounds and the Recursive Conceptualization of "Intellectual Property"

In arguing against perpetual common law copyright in 1774 Lord Camden insisted that literary property was a most unusual species of property in that it knew no bounds: "Where does this fanciful property begin, or end, or continue?" Camden's critique was prophetic. In this paper I consider the manner in which the boundaries of what is now called "intellectual property" have been extended over the centuries in a manner that is inconsistent with the ostensible purpose and theoretical foundation of the law in the United States. Copyright law aims to provide authors with an incentive to create with the expectation that the public will benefit from the creativity. The theory can be stated in various ways, but they all emphasize the prospective goal of copyright protection--that is, copyright is supposed to foment creativity with an eye to the future. Increasingly, however, copyright is applied retrospectively in an effort to offer legal security to the holder of any valuable, or potentially valuable, product in some way related to creative or expressive endeavors. The word "potentially" is important here because the argument made by these holders, many of whom are frequently described as "content-providers," is that what they hold is already property which needs additional legal protection. I contend that what they are really doing is retroactively attaching the word "property," which in American law has the force of ritual incantation, to any thing or process that is capable of making money in order to bring it under the increasingly broad auspices of the Copyright Act. Similar points have been made by others, but what is different about this project is that it reveals the basis of the theory that actually motivates the expansion of copyright. Although this expansion is always justified as being in line with progress, the theory has been quite consistent since the 1800s, and it is fundamentally anachronistic and hostile to technological development. In addition, it is premised on a counterintuitive statement of the relationship between culture and copyright, placing copyright first and forcing an increasing variety of cultural exchange into the vessel of copyright law and theory. In short, the paper concludes that Camden and his anti-proprietary colleagues have proven to be strangely prescient, as copyright theorists have thought and rethought copyright law over the ages, in order to expand the nebulous bounds of the law to cover whatever has already been created and has become of value.

2005 - The Law and Society Words: 136 words || 
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5. Malloy, Robin Paul. "Property, Citizenship, and Social Entrepreneurism: From Real to Synthetic Property" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society, J.W. Marriott Resort, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18373_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper I explore preliminary thoughts concerning a reworking of property categories. Working from the semiotic insight that "the map is not the territory" I seek to explore the connections between different aspects of property, and to examine the relationship among property, citizenship/governance, and social enterpreneurism. I identify our current property system as a set of self contained 'silos' along a linear or horizontal plane with such categories as real property, personal property, fixtures, intangibles, and intellectual property. I contrast this to the idea of a more vertical layering of property categories in terms of ownership, and in relationship to what I currently identify as analytic/physical property and synthetic property. I hope to obtain constructive feedback on my ideas to facilitate advancing my work on the broader project.

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