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Showing 1 through 5 of 1,275 records.
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2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Words: 15 words || 
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1. Lee, Wei-chin. "Yours, Mine, or Everyone’s Property? An Examination of China’s Property Law in 2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p268073_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the origin, process, and controversy of the 2007 property law in China.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 41 words || 
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2. Loew, Chris. "Security, Private Property and Knowledge: The Case of Intellectual Property Rights and Genetic Resource" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p310725_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political theorists are in the midst of an ongoing effort to think through political theory’s central concepts in a global context. This effort has proven to be fraught with challenges both expected and unexpected, as we’ve discovered that our core concep

2019 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 156 words || 
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3. Albertus, Michael. "Property Without Rights: Origins and Consequences of the Property Rights Gap" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Marriott Wardman Park, the Omni Shoreham, and the Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1488534_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Why do governments that distribute property to their citizens do so without the property rights that could support investment and efficient land markets? Major land reform programs over the last century impacted over one-third of the world's countries but left a legacy of highly incomplete rural property rights. Using original data on land distribution and rural property rights in Latin America from 1930-2008, I demonstrate that less institutionally constrained regimes drive the bulk of the “property rights gap,” particularly when large landowners are excluded from the ruling coalition. Whereas these regimes are motivated and capable of distributing property from large landowners to the landless, they often withhold property rights to build peasant dependencies on the state that can be used to pacify the countryside and create a politically pliable, dispersed support base. More institutionally constrained regimes tend to close the property rights gap through titling – though they are hamstrung when it comes to redistributing property.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 409 words || 
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4. Deere, Carolyn. "Governing Intellectual Property: The World Intellectual Property Organization as a Challenged Institution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501267_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The World Intellectual Property Organization, the UN’s anchor institution charged with intellectual property, faces a number of challenges. A complex and expanding patchwork of multilateral, regional and bilateral regimes, institutions, processes and rules, both intergovernmental and private; developing country demands for greater voice and for rebalancing the global IP system; multiplying calls from stakeholders for greater transparency, accountability and participation; a proliferation of global policy debates with an IP dimension; and ongoing debates on how best to stimulate innovation and creativity and to share their benefits, and on the appropriate balance between proprietary knowledge and the public domain. For the WIPO secretariat, these challenges have prompted numerous efforts to retain relevance and authority as the primary fora for IP decision-making in the face of proliferating venues and laws. While the salience of intellectual property as an area in need of international cooperation has never been higher, the recognition of its importance across a growing number of policy issues means that WIPO faces institutional competition from an increasing range of organizations that address IP. It also finds its technical authority challenged in the face of changing ideas about the role and appropriate nature of IP protection, in particular with regard to the circumstances of developing countries. The WIPO Secretariat is called upon to respond to tensions among member states that pit developed countries (calling for WIPO to be the vehicle for strengthening international IP protection) against developing countries focused on advancing a development agenda to promote a fairer global IP system. Even here, however, the configuration of interests among developing countries is evolving. Simultaneously, WIPO is under pressure to respond to public concerns about what kind of knowledge should be owned, by whom and on what terms. Meanwhile, WIPO faces questions about it performance and efficiency from developed countries and large multinational companies that finance the majority of WIPO’s budget (through fees paid in exchange for WIPO’s services related to patent and trademark). This paper explores the circumstances under which the WIPO Secretariat has had the agency and autonomy to adapt to the external challenges it faces. It examines the internal dynamics that have determined the direction and scope of change. It argues that this adaptation has sometimes been a strategic reaction to states’ institutional choices and sometimes a proactive effort. The paper concludes by exploring the impact of WIPO’s responses on the degree and type of international cooperation on global intellectual property governance and on its own institutional effectiveness/performance.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
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5. Liu, Haiyan. "Private Property Rights versus Maintaining Socialist Market Order: The Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in the US and China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482373_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The analysis of aggregate official enforcement data and various documentary data will compare the US and China in relation to criminal enforcement rates; apparent enforcement trends; and major characteristics and problems in criminal enforcement practices, including collaborative enforcement campaigns and operations. More importantly, the analysis addresses a significant explanatory question: the role of criminal enforcement of IPR in the US and China. The author hypothesizes that the role of criminal enforcement of IPR in China is to prioritize socially and politically prioritized goals such as repressing activities that seriously violate the socialist market order. The primary goal of criminal enforcement of IPR in the United States is hypothesized to protect private property rights, especially the interests of big IPR-related businesses. The above hypotheses will be tested by examining the following aspects of enforcement: objectives and emphases of strike-hard campaigns and enforcement operations governments organize under the slogan of IPR protection, types of IP crimes on which the criminal judicial system focuses, profiles of offenders and victims, types and severity of sanctions offenders receive, and victim impact on case processing and outcomes. These aspects will be measured using summary judgments and databases containing individual case information on criminal IP cases.

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