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2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 425 words || 
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1. O'Melinn, Liam. "Property without Bounds and the Recursive Conceptualization of "Intellectual Property"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: Property without Bounds and the Recursive Conceptualization of "Intellectual Property"

In arguing against perpetual common law copyright in 1774 Lord Camden insisted that literary property was a most unusual species of property in that it knew no bounds: "Where does this fanciful property begin, or end, or continue?" Camden's critique was prophetic. In this paper I consider the manner in which the boundaries of what is now called "intellectual property" have been extended over the centuries in a manner that is inconsistent with the ostensible purpose and theoretical foundation of the law in the United States. Copyright law aims to provide authors with an incentive to create with the expectation that the public will benefit from the creativity. The theory can be stated in various ways, but they all emphasize the prospective goal of copyright protection--that is, copyright is supposed to foment creativity with an eye to the future. Increasingly, however, copyright is applied retrospectively in an effort to offer legal security to the holder of any valuable, or potentially valuable, product in some way related to creative or expressive endeavors. The word "potentially" is important here because the argument made by these holders, many of whom are frequently described as "content-providers," is that what they hold is already property which needs additional legal protection. I contend that what they are really doing is retroactively attaching the word "property," which in American law has the force of ritual incantation, to any thing or process that is capable of making money in order to bring it under the increasingly broad auspices of the Copyright Act. Similar points have been made by others, but what is different about this project is that it reveals the basis of the theory that actually motivates the expansion of copyright. Although this expansion is always justified as being in line with progress, the theory has been quite consistent since the 1800s, and it is fundamentally anachronistic and hostile to technological development. In addition, it is premised on a counterintuitive statement of the relationship between culture and copyright, placing copyright first and forcing an increasing variety of cultural exchange into the vessel of copyright law and theory. In short, the paper concludes that Camden and his anti-proprietary colleagues have proven to be strangely prescient, as copyright theorists have thought and rethought copyright law over the ages, in order to expand the nebulous bounds of the law to cover whatever has already been created and has become of value.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Words: 15 words || 
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2. Lee, Wei-chin. "Yours, Mine, or Everyone’s Property? An Examination of China’s Property Law in 2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p268073_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the origin, process, and controversy of the 2007 property law in China.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 41 words || 
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3. Loew, Chris. "Security, Private Property and Knowledge: The Case of Intellectual Property Rights and Genetic Resource" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p310725_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political theorists are in the midst of an ongoing effort to think through political theory’s central concepts in a global context. This effort has proven to be fraught with challenges both expected and unexpected, as we’ve discovered that our core concep

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 514 words || 
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4. Plebanek, Daniel., Perone, Sammy. and Samuelson, Larissa. "The Role of Property-Property Mappings on Cognitive Flexibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958152_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cognitive flexibility is the mental ability to switch between perspectives, tasks, or rules. A canonical probe of cognitive flexibility during early childhood is the dimensional change card sort (DCCS) task. The DCCS requires children to sort two-dimensional cards (e.g., red stars and blue circles) to target cards that match on one dimension (e.g., a red circle and a blue star) by one rule (e.g., sort by color) before switching to another rule (e.g., sort by shape). Children are able to flexibly switch rules by 4 to 5 years of age.
Property-property mappings – the matching of identical values on a dimension (e.g., blue to blue) - are inherent in the DCCS. Interestingly, young children’s ability to make such mappings in the absence of instruction appears to develop some time after age 3, precisely when children begin to solve the DCCS (Sandhofer and Smith, 1999). Children’s ability to make property-property mappings may be connected to developmental change in children’s DCCS performance. We tested this possibility across two experiments. The first tested whether property-property matches are required for children to solve the DCCS. The second tested whether children’s ability to make property-property mappings predicts their performance in the DCCS.
In Experiment 1, the necessity of property mapping was eliminated from the DCCS. Four- and 5-year-old children were asked to sort cards that required them to make category judgments on a dimension. Specifically, when asked to sort by color, children sorted cards depicting variations of blue or green. When asked to sort by shape, children sorted cards depicting variations of short or tall. Under these conditions, 4-year-old children were unable to switch from sorting by color to shape or shape to color. Five-year-old children, by contrast, were capable of switching from shape to color but not color to shape. These results indicate that the absence of property mappings hinders children’s ability to think flexibly in the DCCS.
In Experiment 2, we tested whether children’s ability to make property-property mappings is connected to their ability to think flexibly in our category version of the DCCS. Children participated in a property mapping task in which they were presented with target cards that matched on one dimension (e.g., blue circle and blue square) and asked to select matches from a collection of test cards. Thus, children were required to identify the relevant dimension on the test cards and find the matches without instruction. On some trials, we assessed how children’s performance with canonical colors and shapes typical of their daily experience (e.g., focal blue, focal red, circle, square). On other trials, we assessed performance with more novel colors and shapes (e.g., teal, aqua ovals,) like those used in our category version of the DCCS. Children performed better on the canonical than the non-canonical trials. Children who were able to match non-canonical variations of shape were more likely to flexibly switch from sorting by color to shape in the DCCS. These findings suggest that the ability to make property-property mappings influences cognitive flexibility in the DCCS.

2016 - Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting Words: 193 words || 
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5. Fricke, Aaron. "Property as a Claim to Power: A New Theory of Property" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting, Paris and Bally’s Hotels, Las Vegas, Nevada, <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1111770_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The paper questions previous theories of property in politics, economics and other disciplines, and offers an alternative theory founded in realism. Although existing theories of property have merit in that they contribute to our understanding of the various aspects and functions of property, they misunderstand or disregard the fundamental, irreducible quality or reality of power in property, i.e., that property is merely a claim to power. Power is the effective control over human conduct. Property is an assertion of power over other people, sometimes, in relation to things and places in space-time. Our understanding (or misunderstanding) of property and power is formative to our understanding of inter alia political-economy, jurisprudence, ethics and theories of justice. The paper argues that many seemingly intractable controversies are the result of persistent ignorance and misapprehension of power and its operation, and are, thus, soluble by way of a realistic theory of power. The paper presents in summary form this new theory of power as applied to what we call “property,” which theory is part of a foundation for a new moral philosophy called the “Philosophy of Salus,” which endeavors to articulate a secular theory of justice.

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