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2004 - American Sociological Association Words: 49 words || 
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1. Rosenbaum, Marsha. "Proposition S in San Francisco: A Model for Access" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111140_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Bay Area sociologists and activists assemble to discuss political and cultural struggles over the status of medical marijuana in California, and the formation of patient and advocate communities. The medical marijuana issue encompasses competing visions of medical efficacy, health care delivery, and the roles of patients and caregivers.

2004 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9280 words || 
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2. Percival, Garrick. "How Local Contextual Characteristics Help Determine the Fate of a Statewide Initiative: The Case of California's Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (Proposition 36)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Inter-Continental Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Jan 08, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p68133_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The initiative process is unique from the traditional legislative process in that initiatives are intended to provide a direct (rather than indirect) link between public policy preferences and policy outputs. Because of this, it is often assumed that initiatives, once approved by a majority of voters, are simply transformed into meaningful and uniform policy change. We examine the implementation of California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (Proposition 36), which encourages county law enforcement officials to place “non-violent” drug offenders charged with simple drug possession into drug treatment programs rather than incarcerate them. Using aggregate data drawn from California’s 58 counties, we ask how county-level contextual variables explain several policy outputs associated with Proposition 36. Results indicate counties’ ideological dispositions affect how they implement the initiative where liberal counties provide more high quality treatment services than do ideological conservative counties. Moreover counties’ where the drug problem is more severe are more likely to provide higher quality treatment to SACPA clients than counties where the drug problem is less severe. Finally, we find that counties that were “tough on drugs” before the enactment of the initiative are more likely to incarcerate individuals for low-level drug possession during the first two years of implementation—effectively disqualifying potential SACPA clients for treatment. Contrary to popular conceptions, results here confirm that initiatives are not uniformly implemented, but in fact, will be manifested in quite different, often unanticipated ways, due to local contextual differences.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 303 words || 
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3. Shanske, Darien. "Proposition 13 and the Language of Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117383_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 1978, California voters approved Proposition 13, which dramatically and permanently lowered property taxes. After 25 years, the critique of the policy implications of Proposition 13 has almost become its own genre. The critique is substantial, from tracking obvious effects, such as unbalancing the state’s tax base, to noting more subtle impacts, like encouraging the “fiscalization” of land use decisions. Despite the mounting evidence and even in a year in which California faced a budget deficit equal to a third of its total budget, Proposition 13 not only remained sacrosanct, but Californians found a new mechanism of direct democracy to wield in order to cut taxes (namely the recall). Meanwhile, a number of lawsuits about the interpretation of Proposition 13 have worked their way to the Appellate level; the outcome of these cases, likely to eventually be heard by the California Supreme Court, could change the impact of Proposition 13 dramatically. The ultimate resolution of these cases will mean either the collection of even less property tax revenue under Proposition 13 or the status quo; there is no possibility of collecting more revenue. Clearly, an initiative of the scope of Proposition 13 calls for and has rightly received intense empirical analysis, but these recent lawsuits demonstrate that the law has an internal logic that is not entirely policy driven. Even as the baneful effects of Proposition 13 have mounted, a series of judicial decisions and further propositions have created an interpretive canon that has foreclosed any but the most severe interpretation of Proposition 13. This paper will outline and discuss the creation of this canon as a contribution to a more general analysis of the world disclosive and “foreclosive” power of legal language, even when the core issues could not be more fundamentally policy oriented.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 6827 words || 
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4. Hicklin, Alisa. "The Effect of Race-Sensitive Admissions: Debunking the Myths about Hopwood and Proposition 209" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85605_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2007 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5587 words || 
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5. Conley, Shannon. "Unintended Casualties: Native American Voters and the Proposition 200 Battle" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, La Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 08, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p176271_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The excitement surrounding the victory of Voting Rights Act Renewal was soon diminished as another issue threatening to reverse years of progress came to the forefront. In 2004, Arizona voters adopted Proposition 200, also known as “The Arizona Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act.” This legislation changes the process for voting at the polls by requiring an elector to provide either photo identification with an individual’s name and address, or two other forms of identification with a name and address. Over two years after its passage, proponents of the initiative say that it exists to prevent illegal aliens from voting or taking advantage of the benefits of United States citizenship. Its opponents say that it prevents many legal citizens from voting or taking advantage of their citizenship benefits.
The state of Arizona asserts that the measures will provide greater security and combat fraud. The text of the Amendment declares that illegal immigration is causing economic hardship for the state of Arizona. Additionally, the state finds that illegal immigrants have been given a “safe haven” due to the aid of identification cards given to them without verifying their immigration status first. The findings contend that “this conduct contradicts federal immigration policy, undermines the security of our borders and demeans the value of citizenship.” The ultimate purpose of the Proposition 200 legislation is to compel public agencies to discourage illegal immigration.
On the contrary, voter identification requirements such as those found in Proposition 200 only serve to increase voter frustration. For example, the new current address requirement for identification presents unique barriers for Native Americans, some of whom may not have traditional mailing addresses. Additionally, Proposition 200’s voting-related provisions will significantly hinder grassroots voter registration drives. The majority of poor people and minority citizens register to vote via registration drives. Although the proposition does not directly bar these drives, the requirement that people present their passport or birth certificate shuts down such efforts because it imposes burdensome photocopy and documentation requirements.
Although illegal immigrants are the aim of this legislation, Native Americans in Arizona have become the unintended casualties as they struggle to find ways to comply with the requirements. Although a comprehensive study of this legislation and its statewide impact is a task that will require substantial funding and a team of researchers, in the following pages I hope to contribute to the literature in this area and bring to light some salient issues affecting Arizona’s Navajo voters that both the academic community and community at-large should be aware of.

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