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2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 167 words || 
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1. Earl, Jennifer. "RNC Arrestees and Future Protest Participation: The Impact of Protest Arrests on Future Expected Protest Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the impact of protest-related arrests on future willingness to engage in protest based on data drawn from qualitative interviews with 27 randomly selected protesters who were arrested during the 2004 RNC. The paper begins by discussing the length and detention conditions for arrestees, which situates the reactions of arrestees to their confinement experiences. The paper then examines interview data, identifying and explaining trends that exist between the likelihood of future protest participation, and: (1) whether the participant intended/expected to be arrested or not; (2) severity of arrest and confinement experience; (3) case disposition (found guilty, case dismissed, adjournment in contemplation of dismissal, etc.); (4) prior arrest experiences; and (5) prior protest participation. Findings show that surprisingly, not all of these factors shaped willingness to protest in the future, but some markedly affect stated intentions. Finally, theoretical implications are discussed and findings are situated in terms of their generalizability for all RNC arrestees and other protest arrestees using quantitative data on all 2004 RNC arrestees.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10484 words || 
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2. dos Santos, Marcelo. "Networks of Protest, Protests on Networks: Metaanalysis of the Relationship Between Social Media and Protests" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982780_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Amidst the proliferation of works directed to elucidate the relationship between social media and the recent social movements and uprisings around the world in the last few years, this paper presents a meta-analysis of 56 papers from communication-specific academic databases, from authors and about cases from all continents, which discuss that relationship, aiming to provide a transversal view through a content analysis of the selected sample. Results show suggestive biases that should serve as warning to the area’s researchers, from some more obvious relationships such as method x results, up to some less intuitive relationships. In the end it is opened an invitation to expand this study including other areas and/or deepening some of the present findings in order to ratify or eventually rectify them to, one way or another, advance further on the matter.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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3. Earl, Jennifer. "RNC Arrestees and Future Protest Participation: The Impact of Protest Arrests on Future Expected Protest Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374883_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 272 words || 
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4. Nikolayenko, Olena. "Why Women Protest: Findings from the 2013-2014 Protest Campaign in Ukraine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1246287_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Women have been actively involved in anti-communism resistance movements and post-1989 protest campaigns in Eastern Europe. Yet, women’s engagement in contentious politics has not been fully considered in comparative democratization literature. Addressing this oversight, this study uses the case of the 2013-2014 protest campaign in Ukraine to examine how and why women engage in high-risk activism. The protest campaign, commonly known as the EuroMaidan, was one of the longest and most violent antigovernment protests in the post-communist society, lasting from November 2013 to February 2014 and resulting in the deaths of more than one hundred protesters. The EuroMaidan was initially triggered by the incumbent’s abrupt refusal to sign a free trade agreement with the European Union, but it quickly grew into a social movement encompassing a wide range of political, socioeconomic, and cultural issues. Women constituted a significant portion of participants in these protest events. Specifically, women coordinated the dissemination of protest-related information, provided first aid for the wounded, and patrolled the barricades. Based upon data from in-depth interviews with female protesters, this study identifies a variety of motivations for women’s activism, including active mothering, civic duty, solidarity with family and friends, professional service, outrage over police violence, disapproval of the incumbent’s foreign policy priorities, and long-term dissatisfaction with the government. This study contributes to extant work on gender and politics by tracing women’s participation in the national struggle for independence and democracy in the post-Soviet region. It is important to unravel causes and consequences of women’s activism, especially in repressive political regimes, since women constitute a half of the world’s population and can play a pivotal role in championing social change.

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