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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 39 words || 
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1. Banaszak, Lee Ann. "Is Protestor Alienation Gendered?: An Analysis of Protestors at the 2016 Party Conventions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1355724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I explore gender differences in political alienation and engagement among protestors using a representative survey conducted outside the 2016 RNC and DNC. I find that men were more alienated from and less engaged in electoral politics than women.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Reuning, Kevin. and Banaszak, Lee Ann. "Outside the Convention: Protestor Motivations at the 2016 RNC and DNC and Partisan Activism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248162_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although American history is replete with examples of political parties themselves
as targets of contention by protesters and activists, research on social movements and research on political parties have tended to ignore the phenomenon of the other. We utilize theories on Extended Party Network (EPN) and on Political Opportunities (POS) to examine the motivations that lead individuals to protest parties. We argue that protest purposefully targeting parties is a reaction of an individual’s contradictory relationship to the party (that although they are active in it, they do not feel represented by it). We test this using survey data on participants outside the 2016 Democratic National Convention and Republican National Convention. Using a battery of questions we build scales of party activity and protest goals. We find that the activists outside the DNC focus on the party as a function of both their party activity and their perception of being ideologically distant from the party. In addition, we find that those protesting in order to target the media and voters have stronger distrust of government in general but are not particularly dissatisfied with political parties.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Pages: unavailable || Words: 9836 words || 
Info
3. Reuning, Kevin. and Banaszak, Lee Ann. "Outside the Convention: Protestor Partisanship at the 2016 RNC and DNC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248228_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although American history is replete with examples of political parties themselves
as targets of contention by protesters and activists, research on social movements and research on political parties have tended to ignore the phenomenon of the other. We utilize theories on Extended Party Network (EPN) and on Political Opportunities (POS) to examine the motivations that lead individuals to protest parties. We argue that protest purposefully targeting parties is a reaction of an individual’s contradictory relationship to the party (that although they are active in it, they do not feel represented by it). We test this using survey data on participants outside the 2016 Democratic National Convention and Republican National Convention. Using a battery of questions we build scales of party activity and protest goals. We find that the activists outside the DNC focus on the party as a function of both their party activity and their perception of being ideologically distant from the party. In addition, we find that those protesting in order to target the media and voters have stronger distrust of government in general but are not particularly dissatisfied with political parties.

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