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2013 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 306 words || 
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1. Osborn, Lawrence., Greenberg, Sarah. and Stein, Catherine. "Are Recovery-Oriented Mental Health Services Good For Providers? The Role of Consumer-Provider Relationships for Providers’ Sense of Well-being" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, Jun 26, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646552_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past 25 years, community mental health in the United States has made deliberate efforts to move away from a medical model of service delivery towards a person-centered, wellness-oriented, recovery model. The mental health recovery movement reflects many of the values of community psychology including a focus on individual strengths and self-determination for individuals living with serious mental illness. Strong collaborative relationships between consumers and providers are seen as an essential element of consumers’ recovery. If a recovery model of mental health care promotes collaborative relationships between providers and consumers, then both parties can potentially experience insights such as aspects of personal growth. Yet, the role of a recovery-oriented service model for the well-being of mental health care providers remains largely unexplored. Given the high turnover rate among service providers, research examining aspects of recovery-oriented services that benefit both consumer and provider relationships is essential for advances in mental health care.

Using a sample of 105 interdisciplinary providers from seven community mental health centers in Virginia, the present research investigated the role of individual characteristics, perceived job demands, and provider-consumer relationship factors as they related to providers’ perceptions of their agency’s recovery-orientation and their own sense of job satisfaction and personal growth due to their work with consumers. Findings indicated that providers’ views of their relationship with consumers accounted for the most variation in providers’ reports of agency recovery-orientation and providers’ sense of their own well-being. Specifically, providers’ reports of a stronger working alliance with consumers were associated with greater levels of personal growth and job satisfaction. Providers’ reports of their relationship with consumers accounted for significant variation in their reports of agency recovery-orientation and personal growth beyond individual and perceived job demands characteristics. Implications of study findings for community research and action are discussed.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Rodriguez, Heather. "Providing HIV Treatment in Rural Areas: A Qualitative Analysis of Provider Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253095_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using Andersen’s behavioral model of health services use (2001), this study analyzes data from 61 semi-structured interviews of providers and administrators at health clinics and social service agencies in rural Florida. Andersen’s behavioral model addresses predisposing, enabling, and need factors that influence the use of health services for people living with HIV (PLWH). ATLASti was used to code all interviews and to extract HIV-related themes. The aim of this study was to: 1) add a new dimension to the literature on HIV care services in rural areas, 2) reveal factors that impact ability to provide care to PLWH in rural areas, and 3) suggest ways in which providers and administrators may address any unmet health care needs of PLWH. Respondents perceived systems factors to be more important determinants of access to care for individuals living with HIV and supported ongoing trainings that would increase staff understanding of the needs of PLWH.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Babalola, Stella., Odeku, Mojisola., Akiode, Akinsewa., Cobb, Lisa., Ayankola, John. and Oluwagbohun, Oluwakemi. "Effects of Provider Training on Client-Provider Interactions in Nigeria: A Simulated Client Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1219135_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Introduction: For reasons that span demand and supply factors, contraceptive prevalence in Nigeria remains one of the lowest in the world. As part of the efforts of the Gates Foundation-funded Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI) to address supply-side factors, the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) worked with the State Ministries of Health and local partners in Nigeria to conduct a five-day training for family planning service providers in Benin city and Zaria. Methods: This study used a pre- and post-training simulated client (SC) approach patterned after the GATHER framework to assess the effects of the training on quality of care from the client’s perspectives. Results: The data showed significant improvements in ratings on individual GATHER (Greet Ask, Tell Help. Explain, Return) dimensions and an increase in overall client satisfaction, including perceived competence and trustworthiness of the provider and likelihood of recommending their services. Nonetheless, the data revealed some significant residual weaknesses in provider skills, especially in relation to the Return Greet, Explain and Ask dimensions. Conclusion: These findings suggest that for ongoing family planning programs, a five-day training could be sufficient to improve the quality of client-provider interactions at a magnitude that could be perceivable to individual users and lead to higher satisfaction in the client pool. Nonetheless, there is need for facilitative supervision and periodic refresher training to continue to support trained providers.

2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8524 words || 
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4. Craw, Michael. "Deciding to Provide: Local Decisions on Providing Social Welfare" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p198642_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A fiscal federalism approach to understanding local policymaking predicts little to no role for local governments in social welfare policy: the incentives are to avoid redistributive programs because of their negative impact on the local tax base. Yet Census data indicate that the local role is greater than expected in such social policy arenas as housing, health and public welfare. I explain this outcome in terms of variation between communities in level of interjurisdictional competition and variations in political demand for redistributive programs. I argue that level of competition and demand make their impact on policy not only through the budgetary process, but also in local decisions on whether to begin a social welfare-oriented program and on whether to seek funding for social welfare from state and federal government. I test this model using data from the 1997 and 2002 Census of Governments and find support for the model.

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