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2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9150 words || 
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1. King, Stephen. "Teaching Public Management in the Public Interest: Using the New Public Service Model to Teach Undergraduates in Political Science and Public Administration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140908_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Teaching public management to undergraduate students is challenging. This paper examines one such attempt: to explain public management to undergraduate political science students enrolled in an introductory public administration course. In recent decades, much has been written about managing the public sector more like a business and less like a government. Government management is generally termed wasteful and paper focuses less on how to teach public management in the public interest to undergraduates and more on what should be taught about public management in the public interest. In order to accomplish this goal the paper does three things: 1) it defines public management, 2) describes several competing theories of public management, 3) explains how the New Public Service is applied to various public management situations and realities, and 4) offers conclusions and implications for teaching and research in public management.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 15 pages || Words: 3718 words || 
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2. Licari, Michael. "Public Health and Public Finance: Understanding Public Support for State Cigarette Taxes." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362651_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project attempts to explain levels of public support for increases in state cigarette taxes. Existing models of policy making expect that support for policy proposals is at least somewhat linked to expectations of the efficacy of the policy. At a minimum, this project tests that hypothesis by addressing the link between support for a cigarette tax increase and expectations that such an increase will reduce smoking. However, cigarette taxes are not merely public health regulations. They are also public finance tools, and can serve as a reliable revenue stream for a state government. The second question this project thus addresses is: does support for a cigarette tax increase diminish, even amongst those who expect the tax to reduce smoking, if the revenue is to be used for the general fund (rather than, say, a public health or anti-smoking program)? In other words, do cigarette taxes have to be justified as public health policies in order to secure public support, or are expectations of effectiveness in reducing smoking sufficient? Data for the project have already been collected, via a survey of 1,950 adults in the state of Iowa, conducted in 2006.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 7364 words || 
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3. Lee, Hyung Min. "Public Diplomacy as International Public Relations: Speculation on National Determinants of World Governments’ Web Public Diplomacy Interactivity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170558_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study attempts to explore national determinants of world governments’ Web public diplomacy interactivity, which presumably promotes effective public diplomacy and international public relations to some extent, by content-analyzing the 191 UN-affiliated countries’ public diplomacy Web sites. Based on the result, it is revealed that nation-states’ economic scale and level of social freedom are significant determinants of their level of Web public diplomacy interactivity, whereas their political system is not. Implications and suggestions for future studies are presented as well.

2009 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 491 words || 
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4. Dremock, Fae. "Public Trust or Public Risk?: Low-Information-Rationality Frames, Contamination, and a Public Water Utility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA, Oct 28, 2009 <Not Available>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372893_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Brossard, Scheufele, and others have argued the effectiveness of low-information rationality (LIR) frames in communicating science to the public. LIR frames, however, are not intended to increase understanding of science but to facilitate the public acceptance of science policy or technology implementations. As such, LIR frames position public trust as a product of effective "marketing," yet can also put the credibility of institutions at risk when an affected public seeks transparency in decisionmaking. Similarly, when LIR frames are used to inform fallback communication during times of extended crisis, they can not only contribute to the instability of public trust and the loss of credibility of public institutions. Witness, for example, the shifts in credibility and trust of experts/authority, although to different ends and in different contexts, in reaction to the “work” of U.S. AIDS activists (Epstein, 2000) and Cumbrian farmers (Wynne, 1992).
In this proposal, I suggest that the policy of using LIR outreach frames can also lead to heightened risk to the public. In the case reported here, a neighborhood-led challenge to an implicit LIR frame of public outreach related to the presence of carbon tetrachloride in a regional well grew into a conflict over issues of lay expertise, the credibility of the city public health department, and trust in the water utility. The utility’s long-standing model of public communication was countered by activists, who negotiated joint utility-activist public meetings, who sought the expertise of regional hydrogeologists, and who questioned the wisdom of the “science”-based decisions used to determine safety of their drinking water. The incident I examine occurred when the challenge to utility outreach was at its height and had already resulted both in a new communication plan and in substantial media coverage. During a short-lived chemical contamination of a different city well, the utility returned to their more “comfortable” communication frame. The enduring strength of this LIR model within the utility culture worsened the public risk: It contributed to the failure of the utility to provide information to residents who complained of water containing substantial particulate. It led to under-communication of risk to the staff flushing the street hydrants without precautions for skin and lung exposure. It meant that neither the mayor's office nor city public health was informed of the event until 24 hours later. And it perhaps also helps explain why, despite a broken valve, a suddenly nonfunctioning cardlock on the wellhouse (which delayed awareness of contamination), and water that both stank and in places ran out as black sludge, no one collected water samples for later analysis. As a result, the utility was able neither to ascertain the level of contamination nor verify the absence of other contaminants. The decision not to communicate what as considered to be the science of the situation to any but those in the water utility in charge of maintaining the public trust not only led to dramatic dissolution of that trust but also heightened the risk to the public.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7426 words || 
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5. Lee, Hyung Min., Wang, Kevin. and Hong, Yejin. "Public Diplomacy in Disguise? A Critical Analysis of Nation-States’ Public Diplomacy Communication in Virtual Public Spheres" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p426437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the determinant and agenda behind the allegedly more transparent, mutual, and genuine public diplomacy communication via the Web. Findings suggested that nation-states’ economic interests and motives are considerable factors that influence the quality and content of virtual public diplomacy. Further, the self-interested and goal-directed nature of public diplomacy communication was evidenced through analysis of the objectives, key issues, and publics addressed and highlighted in nation-states’ virtual public diplomacy forums.

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