Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 86 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 18 - Next  Jump:
2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Juvrud, Joshua., Bakker, Marta., Kaduk, Katharina. and Gredebäck, Gustaf. "Relationship between pupil and neural responses: Pupil dilation as early marker for infants’ understanding of social interactions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p956223_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pupil dilation has been used to measure surprise to irrational social interactions (e.g., Gredebäck & Melinder, 2010, Sirois & Jackson, 2012). However, pupil dilations have also been connected with other processes such as changes in attention and information processing load and also change in light and color. Though numerous studies have used pupil dilation as an indication of social attention, the measure has not been validated and related to other measures known to tap social processes. Here we demonstrate a connection between pupil dilations during observation of an irrational social interaction and neural correlates of social processing assessed with ERP component P400. This component has previously been demonstrated to index social attention and the degree to which hands and eyes are directed towards or away from objects.
We tested 9-month old infants’ (N=27; 14 females) integrating two methods: EEG and eye-tracking in order to examine a relationship between neural and visual responses. Infants’ pupil diameter was measured while observing a dynamic social interaction between two actors performing a rational or irrational action with block toys. Each trial began with the first actor performing a “give-me” gesture, followed by the second actor passing a toy block to either the outstretched hand (rational) or the head (irrational) of the first actor. We predicted greater pupil dilation during the irrational presentations when the block was passed to the actor’s head, eliciting a surprise response in the infants. During the EEG experiment, we recorded neural responses to still pictures of a hand formed in a give-me gesture or a control condition (the give-me gesture rotated 90 degrees). We predicted that the neural response to presentations of a give-me gesture would be the P400 component, which is known to be sensitive to socially relevant stimuli (de Haan et al., 2002).
As predicted, ERP results revealed a significant difference in P400 mean amplitude between the give-me gesture (M = 15V) and the control condition (M = 9V) located over the posterior area t(28) = 5.82, p < .001, d = 2.1 The eye tracking measurement of pupil dilations revealed significantly larger pupil dilations for the irrational compared to the rational conditions, t(52) = -2.817, p < .01, d = 1.3, suggesting increased arousal and/or enhanced information processing load during irrational presentations. Furthermore, the results from the ERP and eye-tracking data are strongly correlated. The difference in P400 mean amplitude is positively correlated with the difference in pupil size between the rational and irrational presentations, r = .47, p < .05, suggesting a relationship between infants’ neural sensitivity to the give-me gesture and greater pupil dilation to an irrational social interaction. These correlations suggest that pupil dilation responses are clearly connected to social-action based information processing, such as evaluating a dynamic interaction, and not merely perception or attention based. This study is the first to study the relationship between neural and pupil responses and provides strong evidence for the usefulness of pupil diameter measurements as an early marker for infants’ social cognitive processes in understanding social interactions.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 197 words || 
Info
2. Gil Fuentes, Juan-Vicente. "Cooperative Pedagogic Concerts:Pupils from Secondary Education & Education Grade offer Didactic Concerts to Primary Education Pupils" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577221_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: This Project takes place in the village of Quart de Poblet (Valencia). The pupils of the IES “La Senda” as well as those of the “Florida Universitària” (Catarroja) prepare and offer didactic concerts to the pupils of 1st and 6th year of Primary Education from Quart de Poblet. The preparation of the didactic concerts has a double dimension; first the musical dimension, performed by the Secondary Ed. pupils; second the didactic dimension, offered by the pupils of Grade Education. There are four groups belonging to the Secondary Education High School: choir, instrumental group, violins group and wind-percussion mixed group. These groups use non-teaching time, specifically play-time or after the end of classes schedule for rehearsing purposes. The “Florida Universitària” pupils prepared the auditions within the “Music didactics in Primary Education” subject, being this preparation part of its specific competences. 500 Primary Education pupils assisted to the auditions. The repertoire interpreted was composed by known pieces (“The Beauty & the Beast”, “Caribbean Pirates”, “Indiana Jones”, “Bad Romance”, etc.) and during its interpretation several pedagogic proposals were put in place: dancing with pupils, musical instruments presentation, rhythmic games… This Cooperative Auditions Project will extend along the present School year.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 174 words || 
Info
3. Kodzi, Ivy. and Nderu, Evangeline. "The effects of teacher characteristics and parental collective involvement on student achievement of grade six pupils in Kenya" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400630_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Standard policy approaches to improving education have been to harness the contributions of teachers and parents to other school-level factors that determine academic success. Apart from requirements such as certification, formal degrees and proficiency in the areas of teaching, other teacher characteristics such as language and SES, may impact student achievement. Likewise, literature extensively documents that parental involvement in schools is related to various schooling outcomes. The primary objective of this paper is to ascertain whether teachers with certain characteristics and schools with collective parental involvement have an impact on school performance compared to teachers and schools without these characteristics. In this study, data from 211 teachers in 72 primary schools in 6 districts in Kenya, including teacher characteristics and involvement of parents in school management were linked to the test scores of sixth graders. Multi-level regression techniques were used to model the relationship between the determinants of interest - teacher characteristics and collective parental involvement, while controlling for other determinants of student achievement. Implications for the education policy in Kenya are discussed.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 334 words || 
Info
4. Byamugisha, Albert. "Examining the effects of school environmental factors on pupils's learning achievement in Ugandan primary schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487246_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

In this study, the author employed a multistage analysis procedure to examine the effects of school environmental factors that influenced reading and mathematics achievement among Grade 6 primary school pupils in Uganda. The data for this study were collected in 2007 as part of the Southern African Consortium for Monitoring Education Quality (SACMEQ) that sought to examine the quality of education offered in primary schools in the SACMEQ countries (Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Swaziland, Seychelles, Mauritius, Tanzania, Uganda, South Africa, Zanzibar, Zambia, Namibia, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe). The study focuses on Uganda with the aim of evaluating the influence of home characteristics in raising pupil’s academic achievement as well as establishing the extent to which the school system characteristics influence pupil’s achievement, and lastly investigating how the home-school characteristics influence the pupil learning achievements.
Results of the study show that; for the home context factors, the age of the pupil, size of house hold, sex of the pupil and whether the pupil speak English at home are important factors in the prediction of achievement in reading and mathematics. Also the education of the mother and having electricity at home are important factors that influence pupil’s achievement in reading but not mathematics. For the school context factors, results indicate that; pupil having lunch at school, the type and location of the school, school resources and head teacher tertiary education are important factors in the prediction of achievement in reading and mathematics. For the home-school context factors, the number of days a pupil is absent, repetition of pupils, teachers meeting parents and parents paying extra tuition, characteristics are important factors in the prediction of achievement in reading and mathematics at Grade 6 level in Uganda. From the results of the analyses, several policy suggestions have been made to improve the facets of education that seem to be worthy of action.

Keywords Reading and Mathematics’ achievements, home characteristics, school context characteristics, and Home-school context characteristics.

Albert Byamugisha
Ph D Candidate at the Graduate School of International Studies, Kobe University, Japan

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 248 words || 
Info
5. Abuya, Benta., Oketch, Moses. and Musyoka, Peter. "Why do pupils dropout when education is "free"? Explaining school dropout among the urban poor in Nairobi" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485549_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the means to reaching Universal Access, and MDG goals is to eliminate barriers to access such as school fees. However, research evidence has demonstrated that eliminating fees is not the magic bullet that delivers universal access as dropout after initial entry has now become one of the key challenges to realizing UPE. This study seeks to determine factors associated with drop out among primary school children in the slum areas of Nairobi. Data is obtained from the qualitative component of the drop out study that is part of the of the Education Research Program data sets collected by African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC). The data was obtained from individual children, their parents, teachers and community leaders in the slum communities of Korogocho, Viwandani, Harambee and Jericho. Data was collected using individual interviews, and focus group discussions. We adapt Bronfenbrenner’s ecological framework for understanding the educational risk to understand the phenomenon of dropout. The preliminary findings show that factors associated with dropout include community issues, such as the presence of dumpsites where children collect items to sell; family breakup, school related reasons, such as school levies imposed on pupils who are enrolled in private schools. In particular, girls aged 14-16 years get pregnant and are forced to dropout, while others enter into prostitution to sustain themselves and their families. This study shows that sustaining enrolment in the era of FPE would need a concerted effort that goes beyond the MOE to other sectors of government.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 18 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy