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2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 432 words || 
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1. Coombes, Andrea. and Vijil, Maria. "Building qualitative research capacity in partner countries to carry out qualitative research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-09-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1215932_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The first paper discusses the process the LRCP undertook to train partners in qualitative data collection and analysis. The purpose of the panel is to discuss the process of conducting the stakeholder analysis in each country, highlighting the innovative approach of expanding the in-country capacity to carry out rigorous qualitative research.
The core team trained national partners’ specialists in qualitative research processes and techniques across a period of six months. This period included constant follow-up and teleconferences with all partners, group calls, webinars, and two face-to-face trainings over five days. The first training (February 2016) focused on data collection techniques and modifying the interview and FGD protocols to better address the research questions within each country context. The second training (May 2016) focused on data analysis, report writing, and technical criteria for producing a high-quality qualitative research paper. A webinar and follow-up virtual trainings (May 2016) focused on data coding and categorization of the information collected. These topics aimed to ensure data quality and reduce bias. In addition, the training covered administering and IRB requirements.
During the initial training, each national team member took part in role-playing activities to practice using the protocols to conduct a face-to-face interview or FGD with other researchers, and the entire group provided feedback. The team practiced administering the protocols in the language appropriate for each stakeholder group. Finally, the first interviews provided teams the opportunity to gain experience administering the interview protocols, as well as to assess the appropriateness of the discussion questions. Teams noted challenges in administering the interviews, which we discussed during debriefings. The teams adapted protocol language and procedures accordingly.
The national partners collected data between February and June 2016. It was appropriate for them to conduct the research, as they were closest to the national and regional contexts and thus best able to understand the objectives on the basis of the interactions with the subjects they were engaging. Two researchers attended each interview, one to drive the conversation and the other to take full and comprehensive notes. Researchers also recorded the interviews as a backup.
National partners provided an initial analysis of information gained from the interviews and focus groups to summarize key takeaways and experiences that comprised a summary of emerging themes found during interviews. The teams used these field notes, in addition to the interview notes and transcripts when necessary, to analyze the data. Teams selected the NVivo or MAXQDA program to code the information collected. The core team provided ongoing technical assistance to national partners as they wrote up the results of the analysis and developed their research reports.

2017 - The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 116 words || 
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2. Turner, Daniel. "The Pedagogy of Qualitative Methods via Social Media: Digestibility vs Qualitative Depth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 17, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1239918_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Students increasingly expect learning materials to be on-demand and on-line in a variety of formats. Teachers are under pressure to make their lessons and expertise digestible and shareable by students, often internationally. For qualitative techniques this presents a challenge: how to engage students with complex and nuanced topics in formats that prioritise and reward short content? This talk will share data on the impact of a variety of different formats used on the Quirkos blog (www.quirkos.com/blog), a weekly qualitative methods resource with more than 100 articles and thousands of monthly visitors. Formats and platforms for social media, including Facebook, Google+, Academia.edu, Researchgate.net and LinkedIn posts, blogs, Tweets, infographics and video tutorials will be detailed and debated.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 132 words || 
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3. Knapke, Jacqueline. and Vaughn, Lisa. "Theory and Qualitative Research: How a Theoretical Framework Can Inform and Influence the Qualitative Research Process" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113310_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A theoretical framework can be a powerful tool in qualitative research, giving the researcher not just a lens for collecting and interpreting data, but also a structure and even a lexicon for discussing findings. This paper will focus on a qualitatively-driven mixed methods study that relied upon student perceptions and experiences to evaluate a graduate program in clinical and translational research. The theoretical framework included constructivism theory for curriculum development, disciplinary socialization, and the andragogy model of learning. Using a seven stage process of hermeneutic analysis, the resulting patterns were each connected to one or more of the theoretical foundations. The theoretical framework informed the methods of data collection, the stages of analysis, and the discussion of findings, providing a valuable context for both the research process and the study’s concluding recommendations.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 748 words || 
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4. Valenzuela, César. and Cruz, Daniela. "Survey and qualitative data collection for an experimental evaluation: Data collector’s perspective and qualitative results" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-09-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1357315_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Our organization served as a local research partner for the evaluation of the use of formative and summative assessments in Honduras. In this role, we were the main line of communication between the evaluator and the study schools, and conducted all the survey and qualitative data collection for the evaluation. In this presentation, we will share our experience supporting the randomized evaluation and will present the findings of the performance evaluation.

We supported the evaluation through direct communication with study schools and local authorities. After the evaluator presented the intervention and evaluation design to the Ministry of Education, we introduced the intervention and evaluation to local education authorities, principals, and teachers. Implementing a successful and ethical randomized evaluation depends on clear communication with participating schools, who should understand the random element, and all the ways they might participate. During baseline data collection, we explained the study to each school’s principal, and left information about the study and our contact information in writing. All schools selected for the initial sample and baseline data collection agreed to participate in the study. We did not encounter issues with schools being upset when they were assigned to the control group. We believe that providing clear information early on contributed to schools accepting their group assignment and continuing to participate in data collection. All schools agreed to participate in data collection at all three rounds.

Our performance evaluation relied on focus groups with principals, teachers, and pedagogical advisors, and interviews with key implementation staff. We conducted separate principal and teacher focus groups at midline and endline. The evaluator drew the sample to ensure representation of urban and rural schools, and of each treatment group. We and the evaluator interviewed pedagogical advisors and key staff from the implementing organization during both rounds. We and the evaluator analyzed the qualitative data.

The intervention was implemented as planned. In focus groups, all principals and teachers in the treatment groups indicated that they received training and materials as expected according to their treatment group. Few control group principals or teachers indicated receiving training on assessment. Treatment group principals and teachers indicated using assessment results to modify school management and instruction. These results were consistent with what the evaluator found in their analysis of the survey data. Most control group teachers and principals indicated that they were unaware of their school’s results on end of grade tests, especially at the student level, or did not know how to use the results to improve teaching and learning. Teachers in Groups B and C indicated that they did not administer formative assessments because they did not have copies.

Teachers and principals valued both formative and summative assessments. Teachers and principals reported that they learned a lot from their pedagogical advisors, and invested a significant amount of time in learning how to analyze both types of assessment results, develop action plans, and implement those plans. In general, teachers and principals indicated that they felt the initial and ongoing time investments were worthwhile because they led to improved teaching and results for their students.

Teachers report using end of grade test results in a variety of ways. Teachers reported that after analyzing test results, they used several strategies to improve their teaching and support students. Some teachers reported providing targeted assistance to students that they identified as struggling, both inside and outside regular class hours. Some identified tutors to support struggling students while the teacher was busy. Teachers also used the results to identify areas in which the whole class needed additional support. Based on test results, they dedicated additional class time to such areas. Some teachers took the initiative to invite parents to school to learn the test results and to involve them in their plans to improve teaching and learning based on the results.

Teachers value the formative assessments and adjusted their teaching based on results. Teachers report that the formative assessments were useful to them. They used a variety of methods to adjust their teaching that were similar to those used based on the end of grade results. The formative assessment results also enabled the teachers to provide targeted assistance to struggling students, and involved parents by inviting them to school to share test results. In contrast to the end of grade results, however, teachers report that the formative assessments inspired them to strive to adjust their teaching to match the students’ specific learning needs. Additionally, teachers are able to adjust their teaching and targeting with each monthly assessment.

2018 - 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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5. Xie, Lirong. "A Qualitative Study on the Learning Outcomes of Flipping a Postgraduate Qualitative Research Method Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1370328_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Instead of conventional classroom lectures, a Chinese postgraduate school used the flipped classroom in qualitative research method course. To evaluate the effectiveness, this study explores what are the learning outcomes and which factors influence the outcomes from students’ perspectives. Semi-structured interviews and focus group interviews conducted, and the data were analyzed according to Robert M. Gagné’s theory of learning outcomes. The findings show that the attempt not only facilitates acquisition of principles and philosophy of qualitative research, procedures and techniques (i.e., research plan, interview, coding), how to use Nvivo, but also changes bias against qualitative research ,deepens understanding of the importance of teamwork and improves capacity of multitasking. About the influences, the following bring positive results: team-based learning, authentic research tasks, personalized feedbacks and tremendous dedication. Besides, other factors handicap the outcomes, including limited study time, a lack of teamwork skills, and unbalance between peer instruction and teacher instruction .

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