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2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 146 words || 
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1. Oliveira, Djenane., Alves, Mateus. and Freitas, Erika. "Qualitative research and health care education: Using qualitative approaches to teach health care professionals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p991870_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The epistemological and ontological premises of qualitative inquiry, the different paradigms associated and its most common utilized methods have been instrumental in helping us to prepare more skilled health practitioners. We teach pharmacists to care for people and to help others to make appropriate health care decisions. As we gain more practice conducting qualitative research, we realize its potential to change us as human beings. We learn how to be better listeners and observers, how to become more reflective and open to different ways of knowing, and how to see the world dynamic and changing. We understand that these are essential skills for health care providers. Therefore, our teaching practices have been modified by the values, concerns, concepts and techniques offered by different qualitative methodologies. This presentation will discuss the usefulness of these perspectives in the preparation of professionals and how they can be inventively delivered.

2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 146 words || 
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2. Onwuegbuzie, Tony. and Frels, Rebecca. "Qualitative Interviewing and the Integration of a Quantitative Instrument: An Example of a Qualitative Dominant Crossover Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Qualitative interviews represent one of the most common ways of collecting data because they provide opportunities for the researcher to collect rich and meaning making data. In this paper presentation, we discuss how collecting quantitative data via psychometrically sound quantitative instruments during the qualitative interview process enhances interpretations by helping researchers better contextualize qualitative findings, specifically via qualitative-dominant crossover analyses. We demonstrate that the ontological, epistemological, and methodological assumptions and stances representing the major research paradigms do not prevent researchers from collecting and analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data—at least to some degree for a rigorous process within a qualitative-dominant approach. Finally, we provide an example demonstrating this strategy using a quantitative scale and normative data to help interpret qualitative interviews. Thus, we encourage qualitative researchers, whenever appropriate, to administer one or more quantitative instruments that tap the construct of interest in order to increase verstehen.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6296 words || 
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3. Romero, Diana., Kwan, Amy. and Suchman, Lauren. "Qualitative Data Collection 2.0: Innovations in Field Management and Recruitment in a Large Qualitative Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p651658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past several decades, we have witnessed a dramatic shift in the phenomena associated with family formation, in particular with regard to marriage, cohabitation, and childbearing. Marriage rates have been on a steady decline, divorce has increased, cohabiting unions have increased, and childbearing has decreased. In response, popular and political commentary has problematized this behavior among cohabiting or single women, with additional concern expressed with regard to the poor or otherwise socially disadvantaged, and racial and ethnic minorities. A result of this often exclusive focus on poor women of color who are single mothers has been a limited understanding of how family formation decisions may be different or similar across diverse sub-groups of the population. The Social Position and Family Formation (SPAFF) project thus explored factors influencing family formation with a focus on intimate relationships (eg, dating, cohabitation, and marriage) and childbearing, in the context of different aspects of individuals’ social position. This paper describes the development and implementation of a large-scale (n=200), in-depth interview study utilizing innovative data collection methods used to “connect” over a dozen field staff across a large metropolitan area. A variety of web-based tools were utilized to enhance recruitment and sampling strategies, facilitate management of field interviewers, and streamline data collection and its submission to the project managers. The focus of this paper is methodological, with specific emphasis on the technological and innovative elements developed to advance qualitative data collection of a large-scale study.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 432 words || 
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4. Coombes, Andrea. and Vijil, Maria. "Building qualitative research capacity in partner countries to carry out qualitative research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1215932_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The first paper discusses the process the LRCP undertook to train partners in qualitative data collection and analysis. The purpose of the panel is to discuss the process of conducting the stakeholder analysis in each country, highlighting the innovative approach of expanding the in-country capacity to carry out rigorous qualitative research.
The core team trained national partners’ specialists in qualitative research processes and techniques across a period of six months. This period included constant follow-up and teleconferences with all partners, group calls, webinars, and two face-to-face trainings over five days. The first training (February 2016) focused on data collection techniques and modifying the interview and FGD protocols to better address the research questions within each country context. The second training (May 2016) focused on data analysis, report writing, and technical criteria for producing a high-quality qualitative research paper. A webinar and follow-up virtual trainings (May 2016) focused on data coding and categorization of the information collected. These topics aimed to ensure data quality and reduce bias. In addition, the training covered administering and IRB requirements.
During the initial training, each national team member took part in role-playing activities to practice using the protocols to conduct a face-to-face interview or FGD with other researchers, and the entire group provided feedback. The team practiced administering the protocols in the language appropriate for each stakeholder group. Finally, the first interviews provided teams the opportunity to gain experience administering the interview protocols, as well as to assess the appropriateness of the discussion questions. Teams noted challenges in administering the interviews, which we discussed during debriefings. The teams adapted protocol language and procedures accordingly.
The national partners collected data between February and June 2016. It was appropriate for them to conduct the research, as they were closest to the national and regional contexts and thus best able to understand the objectives on the basis of the interactions with the subjects they were engaging. Two researchers attended each interview, one to drive the conversation and the other to take full and comprehensive notes. Researchers also recorded the interviews as a backup.
National partners provided an initial analysis of information gained from the interviews and focus groups to summarize key takeaways and experiences that comprised a summary of emerging themes found during interviews. The teams used these field notes, in addition to the interview notes and transcripts when necessary, to analyze the data. Teams selected the NVivo or MAXQDA program to code the information collected. The core team provided ongoing technical assistance to national partners as they wrote up the results of the analysis and developed their research reports.

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