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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Trixa, Jessica. and Kneer, Julia. "Developing and Testing the Facebook Usage Questionnaire (FUQ) and the Perceived Facebook Usage Questionnaire (P-FUQ)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108700_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A lot of research has dealt with motivations to use social networking sites (SNS). However, there is little methodological research on how to properly measure active use and how that use is perceived by other users. For our explorative studies, we developed and tested two instruments: (1) The Facebook Usage Questionnaire (FUQ) and the Perceived Facebook Usage Questionnaire (P-FUQ). To test the validity of the instruments, we investigated whether the FUQ is able to detect age and gender differences in Facebook usage and whether the P-FUQ is associated with the perception of credibility, sociability, and narcissism. Our findings suggest that the FUQ captures 3 different dimensions of Facebook usage: social interaction, personal, and professional posting. Age was positively correlated with social interaction and personal posting, whereas gender was only positively related to social interaction. Potential application areas for the instruments and implications for future research are discussed.

2004 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 291 words || 
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2. Beatty, Paul. "The Role of the Interviewer in Cognitive Interviewing Evaluations of Questionnaires" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs, Phoenix, Arizona, May 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p115946_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The basic parameters of cognitive interviewing for improving survey questionnaires (e.g., prompting participants to think out loud, probing about interpretations of questions, and so on) have been well established for a number of years. However, these basic parameters are general enough to allow considerable latitude in practices—thus, activities that share the label of “cognitive interviewing” could in reality be quite different.

Current cognitive interviewing practices reflect two distinctive paradigms, with different conceptualizations of the role of the interviewer. The first is closely tied to psychological methods of protocol analysis and considers the interviewer to be primarily a data collector. Such interviewers are expected to intervene in the data collection process as little as possible, thereby allowing systematic analysis across interviews. The second is a more active form of in-depth interviewing in which the interviewer is charged with exploring meanings of responses in a less structured manner. Such interviewers would make active decisions about issues to explore based on particulars emerging from each interview.

As background, this paper will show how these somewhat divergent practices came to be incorporated under the same label. Its main emphasis will be on exploring the practical implications of these paradigms in terms of what interviewers should actually do in cognitive interviewers, what sort of background would be ideal for them to meet their objectives, and how interviewer behavior shapes the evidence that is used to make questionnaire design decisions. It will also explore some of the tradeoffs involved in scripted vs. unscripted probing, propose guidelines for choosing probes, and criteria for determining whether or not probes are working effectively. The theoretical arguments raised in this paper will be complemented by examples from cognitive interview studies conducted at NCHS.

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