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2013 - The Law and Society Association Words: 210 words || 
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1. Goodman, Philip. "Racing Prisons, Imprisoning Race: The Everyday Construction of Race in California's Prison Fire Camps for Men" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, MA, May 30, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p644915_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite a growing social science literature examining the mechanisms by which race is constructed, those interested in crime, punishment, and prisons have tended more often to treat race as a categorical variable in search of locating and/or explaining disparities at every level of the criminal justice system. Here I take a different tact, using the setting of California’s prison fire camps to explore the micro-level ways in which race is imbued with meaning, and how racial understandings, in turn, color people and settings. Drawing from nearly seventy interviews with prisoners and staff, I argue that prisons are not only ‘race-making’ machines in that they justify and perpetuate inequality (cf. Wacquant 2001, 2002), but they are also sites of literal race construction; similarly, one cannot fully understand prisons without fully understanding race as not just demographic but as lived experience. In the camps in particular, it becomes clear that space matters, and that people’s understandings of race in their current penal setting (the camps) is consciously constructed against a foil of common experiences in traditional walled prisons. The result, I argue, is a more nuanced understanding of the camps as liminal penal sites, and of the fluidity of race, racial norms, and racial norm enforcement in at least some prison contexts.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 464 words || 
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2. Tham, Diana S Y. and Bremner, J Gavin. "The other-race effect emerges first for female faces in infancy: A comparison between single-race and multi-race populations." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961295_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent studies have repeatedly revealed a developmental trajectory of face perception that consists of perceptual narrowing during the first year of life. Accordingly, perception is initially broad but because visual input consists of a prevalence of particular face race (e.g., Kelly, Quinn, Slater, Lee, Ge, and Pascalis, 2007; 2009) or face gender (Quinn et al., 2002), the infant’s perceptual system narrows to develop expertise on familiar type(s) of face.

To understand the effects of exposure and how faces may be represented in infants’ memory, it is important to include studies on individuals with multi-racial experiences. Two studies conducted on infants with multi-racial experiences showed that 3-month-old infants had no preferences (Bar-Haim et al., 2006) and showed no discrimination (Gaither et al., 2012) for own-race over another experienced race. Therefore, the current research aims to understand when the ORE develops for infants in a multi-racial population by testing older infants (4-month-olds and 9-month-olds) in comparison with those growing up in a predominantly mono-racial population.

The key group selected is the Chinese ethnic group in the Malaysian population. Specifically, we targeted these individuals that were born and raised in the capital of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur which is considered integrated in terms of its population make up (45.2% Malays, 42.3% Chinese, and 11% Indians; Department of Statistics Malaysia, 2011). We assessed Malaysian-Chinese (n = 34) and British-White (n = 46) infants’ ability to discriminate faces from three racial groups (Chinese, White, and Malay) of both face gender (female and male). We used a habituation-novelty method in which infants are initially habituated to a particular face that was either presented in a frontal view or ¾ profile view, and are then presented with test trials of two faces (familiar and novel) of the alternate view from habituation. According to the exposure hypothesis, we expect the British-White infants to demonstrate an ORE, selectively discriminating own-race faces, whereas the Malaysian-Chinese infants to show an ORE discriminating both Chinese and Malay faces.

As predicted, 4 month old British-White and Malaysian-Chinese infants demonstrated recognition only for female own-race faces, t (7) ≥ 2.342, p < .05. Findings on 9-month-old infants differed according to population. British-White infants showed a recognition advantage for both female and male own-race faces, t (7) ≥ 2.38, p < .05. In contrast, those from the multi-racial population demonstrated a recognition advantage for female own-race (Chinese) and female other-race (Malay) faces, t (7) ≥ 2.804, p < .05. The pattern of performance in this study suggests that (1) the perceptual system is narrowed to the current most prevalent face type by 4-months; (2) that the perceptual system can be modified according to increased familiarity; and (3) it is vital to take into account the role of face gender when investigating on face perception within the first year of life.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 8476 words || 
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3. King-O'Riain, Rebecca. "Race, Mixed Race and ‘Race Work’ in Japanese American Beauty Pageants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p101978_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Long-standing debates within critical race theory about the efficacy of the concept of ‘race’ have posited the mixed race experience as an illustration of the flexible and multiple nature of this socially constructed concept (Gans 2005). However, mixed race studies (Root 1996; DuBose and Winter 2002) themselves have shown that mixed race does not mean ‘no-race’. There persists, even in mixed race research, the notion of race as a concept where racial meaning is congealed and tied through its supposed association with the body to biology. Using ethnographic fieldwork in Japanese American beauty pageants, this paper illustrates that the mixed race body invites us to examine more carefully race work – a concept that I introduce to explain how people exert effort to try to keep their own biological notions of race (typically references to looks or physical appearance) in line with their thinking about culture (i.e. full blooded people of color have culture, whites don’t). I look at multiple levels of social interaction in order to shed light on how race is socially and politically constructed in a world where race has gone underground and is more difficult to detect and trace – a world where there can be “racial intent without race”(Ignatiev 2004).

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 4303 words || 
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4. Rucker, Iliana. "Race in the Race: Mixed Race Identity and Obama’s Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366651_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During Obama’s campaign, a video was created by the Los Angeles Times consisting of interviews with individuals who identify as multiracial. Three sections within the video are identified: assumptions about race, assumptions about racism, and the ideal of transcending race. Each section contains progressive and non-progressive stances on issues concerning multiracial identity and Obama’s candidacy. Obama’s presence in the campaign and his election may recast how race is talked about for the future.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 152 words || 
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5. Givens, Eugena., Gillespie, Lane. and Richards, Tara. "Examining the Influence of Race on the Presentation of Femicide in the News: Does Perpetrator Race, Victim Race or Racial Dyad Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p576071_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The news media play a substantial role in shaping society’s perception of social issues, including domestic violence. At the same time, prior literature suggests that media representations of crime and violence may differ depending on the race of the victim and/or the perpetrator. To date, minimal research has been conducted examining the potential influence of race on how the news media frame stories of femicide. The present research uses both quantitative and qualitative content analysis to compare newspaper articles of 67 femicide cases involving Black perpetrators and 67 femicide cases involving White perpetrators. Cases were analyzed to determine if different media frames were used to portray cases with Black perpetrators and Black victims, cases with White perpetrators and White victims, and/or cases involving inter-racial couples. Findings outline significant differences in media frames dependent upon the race of victims and perpetrators. Implications for societal perceptions of femicide among Blacks and Whites are discussed.

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