Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 247 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 50 - Next  Jump:
2003 - American Sociological Association Words: 240 words || 
Info
1. Bryant II, Wilbur. "Racist Propensities of Whites in Black/White Relationships versus Racist Propensities of Whites in Endogamous Relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106033_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since 1960, there has been an astronomical increase in interracial relationships in the United States. It could be argued that this increase represents a sea change in the racial attitudes of White Americans. To the degree that this is true, how do the racial attitudes of Whites involved in interracial relationships differ from the racial attitudes of Whites who are not in such relationships?

I attempted to answer this question by first seeking out literature on the subject. I found literature that spoke to many aspects of interracial relationships, and, certainly, there has been research into the racial attitudes of Whites in general; however, none of the research that I located examined the racial attitudes of Whites in interracial relationships. I have therefore endeavored to fill the gaps in this literature.

I enlisted White students on the campus of Columbia University in the City of New York to participate in my research. From this sample, I gathered data on a variety of factors, but I was interested primarily in the respondents’ exposure to and familiarity with African-Americans, their attitudes about African-Americans, and their experience with interracial relationships.
While the results of my research do not indicate that Whites in interracial romantic relationships do not harbor some racist beliefs, they do indicate that there is indeed a difference in the racist attitudes harbored by these Whites as compared to Whites who have never been involved in interracial romantic relationships.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7338 words || 
Info
2. Graham, Octavia. "What Can Racist Memorabilia Teach Modern America? The Uses and Pitfalls of Racist Memorabilia in Museum Exhibition" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/OCTET-STREAM>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p425565_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This work begins by providing information on contemporary and traditional modes of viewing black memorabilia, focusing on the shifting meanings assigned to such collectables and their growing popularity in recent years. From there, I will probes the usefulness of displaying racist memorabilia within a museum setting, specifically addressing the museum’s ability to present an accurate image of history while constructing a rhetoric of tolerance and promoting discussions of race.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6436 words || 
Info
3. Geer, Shaun. "“My racist friend”: Social Networks of Overt Racists on Myspace.com" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p508076_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the friendship networks of overt, militant racists in America, on the social networking website “Myspace.com”, and places it in context of two sets of theories. One of these theoretical bodies suggest that militant racists are formed in isolation from a larger society, and the other theoretical body suggests that militant racists are formed in highly integrated, heterogeneous social networks. The findings show that militant racists tend to exist in a highly heterogeneous social network, with a higher prevalence of black people in their extended network than the average white person in the United states.

2016 - Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting Words: 230 words || 
Info
4. Gonlin, Vanessa. "Manifest Destiny: Religious Doctrine, Racist Doctrine, or White Racist Framing?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting, Paris and Bally’s Hotels, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 23, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1111267_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Religion is used by elite white men as an excuse to justify atrocities that take place when operating out of the white racial frame. Manifest Destiny was a religious doctrine used by white Americans to claim religious superiority over the people they conquered. Feagin (2014) explains the phenomenon of whites perceiving themselves as virtuous Christians and the people they conquered as unchristian savages. Manifest Destiny asserts religious superiority, yet historians tend to forget the document was created by white men. When we remember this fact, we are forced to contemplate the racist framing in the minds of these white men that was present before the religious doctrine was introduced. In addition to being a religious and racist doctrine, Manifest Destiny was created by white men operating out of the white racial frame and it was upheld and enforced by a white, racist government and gained traction in the minds of a white, racist American public. Regarding the inherently racist doctrine Manifest Destiny, the scholars who do problematize the racist aspect neglect to recognize the worldview that the creators of the doctrine operated out of. This allows white Americans to apologize for violence in the era of Manifest Destiny without taking any responsibility for implementation and reification of racist ideas. By not acknowledging the actors or the racist government operating out of this framework, we allow future atrocities to take place.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 180 words || 
Info
5. Kang-Brown, Jacob. "Punishing Racism: Youth Accounts of Racist and Anti-Racist Fights in California’s Juvenile Correctional Facilities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517972_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hate crime law in the U.S. relies on sentencing enhancements to punish racist crime, yet incarceration is easily one of the most racially structured settings in American life. Litigators and activists invoke structural racism to explain glaring racial disparities in the criminal justice system and the nature of juvenile punishment. Popular accounts of California juvenile correctional facilities describe endemic violence and tension along overlapping lines of gang affiliation and racial identity. This generates a paradox: incarceration is simultaneously punishment for racist crime, an instance of structural racism, and concentrated exposure to racist violence.

Thus, once incarcerated, how do youth talk about racism and their involvement in intergroup violence and conflict? Using data from interviews and observations with over 350 young men and women in California’s Juvenile Justice system, we ask how youth account for racism in their own lives. We explore youth accounts of racist and anti-racist violence, and the way that racism becomes a cover for more intimate motives. What can their accounts of racist violence - as victims, perpetrators, and observers - teach scholars of hate crime?

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 50 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy