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2003 - American Sociological Association Words: 3 words || 
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1. Manning, Peter. "Rationality and Police Work: Is Rational Choice the Best Way to Get at Situational Rationality?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106218_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: (to be uploaded)

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 10 pages || Words: 4246 words || 
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2. Shih, Miin-wen. "Economic Rationality, Existential Rationality, and Environmental Concern" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183579_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The primordial phenomenological/existentialist experience is ethical because it implies human being’s attitude of non-domination towards other human beings and nature. The experience itself is reason/rationality itself, because once the primordial existential experience is restored the instrumental reason/rationality is ‘naturally regulated’ by value reason/rationality; in other words, value reason implies instrumental reason and both reasons are actually reason itself. Though the mechanism of reason and rationality is more complicated and incorporates the existential, psychological, and social process, only reason and rationality can solve the environmental problem.

2009 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 168 words || 
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3. Feenberg, Andrew. "Rationalizing Play: Games as Systems of Social Rationality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373976_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: This paper constructs a new framework for the study of games as sites of social rationalization, applying Feenberg's critical theory of technology. We begin by making the case for a consideration of games as systems of social rationality, akin to other modern systems such as capitalist markets and bureaucratic organizations. These systems are characterized by procedures such as precision and optimization that distinguish them from the surrounding lifeworld. When game rules are installed in software and deployed on the Internet a fundamental change in the nature of play occurs. This is especially true of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs), through which a new rationalized social form involving millions of subscribers emerges. Like other rationalized institutions, this new social form is contested in various ways by its users. This paper relates these forms of user agency to the rationalizing strategies of video game corporations. The discussion contributes to the study of user agency in STS by focusing on a new domain in which users encounter technology as software code.

2011 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 111 words || 
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4. joyce, peter. "Graphing rational functions and solving rational inequalities without a calculator" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, Lexington Convention Center, Lexington, KY, Aug 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521943_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many textbooks that solve the problem of graphing rational functions or solving rational inequalities lack a nice way to unify their steps to create a simple method to solve problems.
With standard rules of end behavior of rational functions based on the degree of the numerator and the degree of the denominator and the sign of leading coefficents of the numerator and the denominator together with the mulitiplicity of the zeros and vertical asmyptotes we can solve the problems in record time. Also, given a graph of a rational function we can approximate the actual rational function very easily.
Solving rational inequalities and graphing rational functions based on solid mathematical theory is fun.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Sato, Yoshimichi. "Exploring Moving Mechanism between Forward-looking and Backward-looking Rational Actions: Toward a Meta Rational Choice Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120525_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I propose a theory on the move between forward-looking and backward-looking rational actions, which I call the meta rational choice theory. People smoothly move between the two types of rational actions. When they cough and have a slight fever, they visit their family doctor as usual, which is an example of backward-looking rational action. In contrast, when a cancer is found in their lung, they try to collect as much medical information as possible to find doctors with excellent records of lung-cancer operations. This is an example of forward-looking rationality.
Rational choice theory, to my knowledge, has not developed a good theory to explain the move between the two types of rationality even though, as pointed out above, people smoothly move between them in their everyday life. I argue that the meta rational choice theory properly explains the move.
Cognitive burden and payoff are the major building blocks on which the theory is built. If the cognitive burden on a person is light and the payoff is low, he/she takes backward-looking rational action. In contrast, if the cognitive burden on the person is heavy and the payoff is high, he/she takes forward-looking rational action.
I examine three cases to check the empirical validity of the theory: Inequality of educational attainment, education and health, and cancer treatment. Studying these case with the help of the meta rational choice theory demonstrates that seemingly irrational actions can be explained as rational actions.

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