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2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 146 words || 
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1. Urban, Mathias., Jones, Liz., MacLure, Maggie., Holmes, Rachel., MacRae, Christina. and Osgood, Jayne. "Eu(rope): (Re)assembling, (Re)casting and (Re)aligning Lines of De-and Re-territorialisation of Early Childhood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558182_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A pivotal aim of this assemblage is to (re)(e)value(ate) current micro- and macro-policies and –politics (Dahlberg & Moss) that shape – and are shaped by – conceptualisations of and, in consequence, practices towards young children in a range of locations, institutions and figurations (Elias). The ‘geopolitical’ location for our investigation is Europe, understood as conceptual space(s) as well as (geographical) territory. Our genealogical (re)turn within this ‘knowledge space’ or ‘knowledge assemblage’ (Turnbull) can be understood as ‘a dialectical [process] in which forms of social space are co-produced’. We are interested in the knowledge-spaces emerging from/through policy processes from the micro within EC settings to the ‘corridors of power’ associated with EU policy making? Who are – and what informs and drives - the actors? What are the (European?) childhood(s) that emerge from these spaces, what are the practices that are being imagined and promoted through policy?"

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6234 words || 
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2. Mihailidis, Paul. "(Re)mix, (Re)purpose, (Re)learn: An Analysis of Participatory Tools and Media Literacy Outcomes in the University" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 23, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492059_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores how participatory online tools can enable media literacy learning outcomes premised on production, participation and collaboration. In Spring 2009, 218 students at Hofstra University and the University of Maryland remixed news from major news networks around the world using LinkTV’s Know the News remix tool. The participants were then asked to complete a series of questionnaires detailing their experiences with remixing, media literacy, and learning about bias, perspective and ethics news. The study investigated how the remixing process can help teach new understandings of news production and dissemination using digital technologies and participatory web tools. By allowing students to actively remix and (re)create their own media scripts, they were able to better grasp the storytelling process and its limitations. The results of this study show how new media technologies can empower students to become more active, engaged, and participatory citizens in digital spaces.

2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Osvath, Csaba. "Concrete Learning: Re-imaging, Re-constructing, and Re-telling Stories Through Concrete/Visual Poetry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027870_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 279 words || 
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4. Griffiths, Jennifer. ""You’re young, you’re Black, and you’re on trial. What else do they need to know?”: Reading Walter Dean Myer's Monster" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, Mar 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005531_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the wake of the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Mo., a Black Twitter campaign emerged that responded to selective circulation of images suggesting the criminality of black youth. Using the hashtag #iftheygunnedmedown, this social media protest included two seemingly disparate images: one that would be construed as “thug-like” behavior and one with normative, positive images, including graduation and family photos. Similar to the “iamtrayvonmartin” campaign on Tumblr in which people dressed up wearing hoodies, this new effort critiqued the blame-the-victim mentality that stereotyped and scapegoated young Black men in the court of public opnion. This paper compares recent social media efforts to reclaim the self-representation of black youth with Walter Dean Myer’s novel Monster, an experimental text in which an African American teenager scripts his experience in jail and on trial for a murder he did not commit. In both experimental texts, young Black men take control of their images and critique the dehumanization they face in relation to criminalization of black youth. Part of the analysis will include the recent exoneration of the Central Park Five and will compare Meyer’s novel with the depiction of the five teenagers in the Central Park case, who were all treated as “monsters” by media and prominent political/cultural figures. Connections will also be made to George Stinney, the youngest person to be executed in the U.S., who was also recently exonerated. With this history and current critique in mind, this paper will examine Monster as a radical creative intervention toward recognizing the complex, nuanced subjectivity of a young Black man who takes control over his own narrative under extreme circumstances.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6641 words || 
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5. Kane, Melinda. "We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re University-approved: Predicting Officially Recognized LGBT Student Groups in Six States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564428_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The goal of this paper is to explain the presence of university recognized LGBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender) student groups on the college and university campuses in six U.S. states. Significant research has documented the challenges faced by GLBT students on campus, but few studies examine why certain universities are more institutionally supportive than others, including which colleges have student groups—an important form of institutional support. Drawing upon data from a wide range of sources including the National Center of Education Statistics, the Gayellow Pages, and campus websites, I use logistic regression to examine the importance of three broad factors: public opinion on campus; community resources; and the larger institutional environment. Results suggest that the institutional characteristics are particularly important in explaining the presence of officially sanctioned LGBT groups.

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