Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 340 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 68 - Next  Jump:
2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 7219 words || 
Info
1. Lieber, Robert. "Are Realists Realistic About Foreign Policy?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62654_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Realists have made important predictions and offered policy prescriptions on major foreign policy issues since the end of the Cold War. Kenneth Waltz predicted the demise of NATO ("NATO's days are not numbered, but its years are") and warned that with the end of the Soviet threat, former friends and foes of the United States would seek to balance against the international predominance of the United States. He also argued that the gradual spread of nuclear weapons might not be a bad thing and that by making states less insecure this would induce caution among even the cruelest leaders. Others have predicted US withdrawal from Europe followed by a return to great power competition among Europe's leading states, opposed enlargement of NATO and predicted serious trouble with Russia if this were to occur, advocated that the US begin a gradual process of disengagement from Europe, and stipulated that US air power would be of little use in Afghanistan. More recently, a group of mostly well-known structural realists argued that, much like other leaders, Saddam Hussein could be contained within Iraq and deterred from attacking his neighbors or using weapons of mass destruction against the United States and its friends and allies.

The realists' overall record is mixed. Realists, drawing on realist theory, were certainly more prescient than others about the likelihood of continuing conflict in post-Cold War international politics and the limits of "global governance." On the other hand, theory-driven predictions about NATO have not been borne out - at least not yet - and policy recommendations about Iraq may have owed more to personal preferences than to theory. The record of the recent past thus suggests the need for more subtlety in applying realist assumptions to the real world. Ironically, the implication of the NATO and Iraq cases may be that realist authors have not always have been realist enough in doing so.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: 213 words || 
Info
2. Sterling-Folker, Jennifer. "A Neoclassical Realist Guide to Economic Interdependence and Cooperation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151630_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: This paper maps out a neoclassical realist framework for understanding the relationship between domestic politics, economic interdependence, and cooperation. Much of the literature on economic interdependence assumes that there is a causal relationship between interdependence and cooperation. Systemic realist analyses have begged to differ; so too have neoclassical realist analyses, but for very different reasons. The framework presented here starts with the observation that intra-group resource allocation processes always involve internal competition (electoral competition in democracies; bureaucratic struggles in non-democracies). It argues that such competition is also always connected to the politics of group identity, as a process of self-other differentiation in the modern Wesphalian system that links groups identity to notion s of autonomy and territorial self-determination. It argues that this link between intra-group competition and identity politics, in both its implicit or explicit forms, drives interdependent cooperation, and hence there is little reason to be sanguine about the phenomenon. It utilizes cases from the US (implicit forms of ID politics) and China-Taiwan (explicit forms of ID politics) to illustrate this framework. Although it concurs with most systemic realist analysis that cooperation, peace, and interdependence do not necessarily correlate, it also raises questions about the compatibility of insights drawn from neorealist and neoclassical realist analysis.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 7240 words || 
Info
3. Narine, Shaun. "A Constructivist Analysis of the East Asian International Political Economy: An Answer to the Realist-Liberal Debate" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73917_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study of international political economy in East Asia usually breaks down to a contest between two theoretical interpretations of state action: liberalism vs. realism. Many scholars of East Asia take a traditional liberal approach to the region, arguing that economic interaction and mutual economic self-interest will have a pacifying and unifying effect on the region. Critics of this approach adopt a traditional realist perspective and argue that security concerns, territorial disputes and competition for power and influence limits the extent to which economic interaction can affect the political economy of East Asia. This paper will argue that both approaches touch on critical truths about East Asia, but both fail to place the development of the regional political economy into the appropriate social context. Understanding the political economy of the region requires articulating and understanding the social relationships and normative structures that define regional interaction. The most important factor affecting inter-state relationships in East Asia is the need to develop viable and stable states. This imperative affects how state elites define their relationships with other states, and determines if ostensibly realist or liberal considerations carry greater weight in shaping a state's economic policies. This paper will apply a constructivist analysis to the study of the East Asian political economy. It will draw on the work or Joel Migdal, Peter Dauvergne and others in assessing how the issue of state capacity affects state interests and actions.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 105 words || 
Info
4. Nexon, Daniel. and Jackson, Patrick. "Toward a Realist-Constructivist Research Agenda" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70916_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Patrick Thaddeus Jackson and Daniel H. Nexon propose an alternative heuristic for mapping general approaches to international politics, focusing on two analytical dimensions. First, to what degree do theories and approaches hold that anarchy is a fixed constraint on actors in the international system? Second, to what degree do theories and approaches hold that power can be transcended in international politics? Such a re-mapping of the discipline shows that the 'three-cornered' debate between realism, liberalism, and constructivism is, at minimum, a 'four-cornered' fight in which variants of constructivism share at least as much in common with realist theories as with liberal and other constructivist approaches.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 383 words || 
Info
5. Steele, Brent. "The Reflexive Realists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178496_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since the turn of the century, a noticeable shift has occurred in IR scholarship. While the practice of ?reinventing? realism is by no means new (see Robert Cox?s work on E.H. Carr) both the quantity and tone of recent reinventions of realism have taken a decidedly reflexive turn. This paper examines the work of several ?reflexive realists? ? notably Anthony Lang, Michael Williams, and Richard Ned Lebow ? to explain through three assertions the importance of this turn for IR theory and international politics. First, it has resurrected a voice for particular realists (Morgenthau especially) that had been lost. Second, it serves as a launching pad for a serious critique of neoconservatism. This critique provides an important ally for the same English-School scholarship that has found an historical tension with classical realism. Third, and related to the second, it has provided an effective (and in the United States, unique) critique of the Iraq War (both the decision to invade and its conduct). This critique of Iraq in many ways echoes that made by Morgenthau and Niebuhr of the Vietnam War some forty years ago. For these three reasons, the work of the reflexive realists should be applauded. Yet there are two further consequences ? one pedagogical, one theoretical - that must be noted regarding this work. Reflexive realist scholarship reorients not only how we understand realism as scholars but also how we introduce classical realism in our courses (both graduate and undergraduate). The downside to this particular consequence is that a presentation of ?critical? realism might actually confuse budding IR students ? making it difficult for instructors to paint, and students to digest, realists as perpetually pro-war ?hawks? in relation to liberal ?doves.? While this might make qualifying exams more difficult to evaluate, I note, however, that confusing advanced undergraduate and graduate students has its benefits as well. A second consequence of reflexive realism is theoretical and scholastic ? claiming ?Thucydides? and ?Morgenthau? as critical theorists (whether in reality they were or were not) may reinforce the practice of territorial scholasticism. In order to give their work more weight, scholars may compete to claim the work of realists as their own. Yet the obvious costs to this second consequence are far outweighed by the benefits noted in the first half of the paper.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 68 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy