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2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Lee, Hun-Yul. "Production revelation, reality, and reality shows in Korea: Why and how production is revealed to enhance reality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113928_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article focuses on a peculiar phenomenon in Korean television—revelations of production activities in reality shows. For example, the revelation regarding production of the popular television show Two Days and One Night (1bak 2il) is closely connected with reality television. In general, reality shows bring about reality with the appearance of ordinary people, but Korean reality shows cannot do that for various reasons. Korean producers often replace the reality of ordinary people with production reality through bloopers, intended revelations, and appearances as regular guests. These kinds of revelations utilizing production activities and production staff are efficient replacements for ordinary people. They portray historical reality in the workplace and provide authenticity. This choice for revelation is a conservative one, as it closes the door for ordinary people to achieve the fifteen minutes of fame. However, stylistic decisions amidst rising competition, flexibilization of broadcasting labor, and technological developments in Korean broadcasting seem inevitable.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5121 words || 
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2. Jordan, Meggan. "Reality Confused: Beauty Hierarchies, Women with Disabilities, and Reality Television" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411506_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper invites discussion on Western popular culture’s views of young women with physical disabilities. The meaning of gender and disability in Britain’s Missing Top Model, a televised modeling competition among women with disabilities, will be introduced and critiqued. Distinctions will be drawn between beauty hierarchies as presented in this show and public body transformation like Extreme Makeover and corporate transformations like Dove’s “Real Beauty” campaign. Theoretically, I draw from Wendell (1996) and Thomas’ (2007) theory on the social construction of disability, Giddens’ (1991) theory of the self as an active project, West and Zimmerman’s (1987) theory of “doing gender,” and Messerschmidt’s (2009) theory of embodied gender.

This topic is a subset of my larger dissertation research on the embodied experiences of young women with physical disabilities and facial differences. Three broad goals of the research are: 1) to research women at the margins of capitalist beauty hierarchies, 2) to understand the meaning of gender and sexuality for young women with unusual appearances, and 3) to offer a creative platform for speaking about disability issues. Through this dissertation, I hope to develop a typology that explains how society creates physical disability and gender through beauty hierarchies and able-bodied normativity. It will also explore the consequences of these constructions for women, advancing Whittington-Walsh’s (2002) work on the “attitudinal violence” of the public stare.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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3. Brown, Sheila. "Murders and Their Mediations: The Reality of Death in the 'Death of Reality'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408810_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws on original research following murder inquiries in the UK, tracing cases through fieldwork with the police, and following the cases as they became mediatized . Both the police inquiry and the media sensation can be read as different moments within the postmodern frame of the ‘death of reality’ in information society; and yet inscribed within the process of mediatizing death as an entertainment product is the reality of death. Within the media project deaths are remodelled : aspects are scaled up, scaled down, personalities and lives reconstructed. ‘True’ victims are valued and less worthy victims relegated. The police inquiry is a drama that concludes when a suspect is charged, leaving the aftermath unspoken about. The police themselves collude in the media project, and the complex reality of the victim recedes as the public media progressively re-sell the murder as infotainment and spectacle, moral signifier and compass. Cumulatively the cultural evasion of homicide death through its emotive and yet depthless representation empties death of content and turns murder into a reality show. The paper explores these questions critically using case studies and asks whether dignity can be restored to the murder victim in a mediatized culture.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6681 words || 
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4. Cohen, Jonathan. and Weimann, Gabriel. "Who's Afraid of Reality Shows? Exploring the Perceived Influence of Reality Shows and the Concern Over Their Social Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170111_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores the dynamics of social concern over reality shows. Couched in the theory of the influence of presumed influence, it is argued that the degree of concern over the effects of media mediates between beliefs in media power and people's responses to such beliefs. Survey data show that whereas there are large differences in the beliefs about effects on self and others, reports of self concern and perceived concern by others is similar. It was also found that concern is related to age, to beliefs in the social effects of reality shows, and to being critical of reality shows. Results are discussed in terms of their significance to understanding the process through which beliefs about media motivate social action.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 8770 words || 
Info
5. Fogel, Jennifer. "Reality Parenting 101: Celebrity Dads, Reality Sitcoms, and New “Old-School” Family Values" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298077_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Amidst a deluge of celebrities parading their personal lives before the cameras to raise their own celebrity status or resurrect dwindling careers, a host of stars have elected to invite cameras into their homes in order to put forth reality sitcoms centered on the presentation of strong family morals and simple parenting lessons. Reality sitcoms have become the next generation of domestic sitcoms by adhering to generic sitcom conventions and consciously using family values as its foundation. Of these reality sitcoms, two iconic musicians, Joseph “Reverend” Simmons of Run-DMC and Gene Simmons from KISS, have used their respective cable shows as a pulpit to preach – often through humor – a return to paterfamilias and the importance of family love and loyalty, even for the most unconventional families. Despite different parenting styles and attitudes, both reality TV dads are the Ward Cleavers of a new generation.

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