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2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Lee, Hun-Yul. "Production revelation, reality, and reality shows in Korea: Why and how production is revealed to enhance reality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113928_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article focuses on a peculiar phenomenon in Korean television—revelations of production activities in reality shows. For example, the revelation regarding production of the popular television show Two Days and One Night (1bak 2il) is closely connected with reality television. In general, reality shows bring about reality with the appearance of ordinary people, but Korean reality shows cannot do that for various reasons. Korean producers often replace the reality of ordinary people with production reality through bloopers, intended revelations, and appearances as regular guests. These kinds of revelations utilizing production activities and production staff are efficient replacements for ordinary people. They portray historical reality in the workplace and provide authenticity. This choice for revelation is a conservative one, as it closes the door for ordinary people to achieve the fifteen minutes of fame. However, stylistic decisions amidst rising competition, flexibilization of broadcasting labor, and technological developments in Korean broadcasting seem inevitable.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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2. Brown, Sheila. "Murders and Their Mediations: The Reality of Death in the 'Death of Reality'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408810_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws on original research following murder inquiries in the UK, tracing cases through fieldwork with the police, and following the cases as they became mediatized . Both the police inquiry and the media sensation can be read as different moments within the postmodern frame of the ‘death of reality’ in information society; and yet inscribed within the process of mediatizing death as an entertainment product is the reality of death. Within the media project deaths are remodelled : aspects are scaled up, scaled down, personalities and lives reconstructed. ‘True’ victims are valued and less worthy victims relegated. The police inquiry is a drama that concludes when a suspect is charged, leaving the aftermath unspoken about. The police themselves collude in the media project, and the complex reality of the victim recedes as the public media progressively re-sell the murder as infotainment and spectacle, moral signifier and compass. Cumulatively the cultural evasion of homicide death through its emotive and yet depthless representation empties death of content and turns murder into a reality show. The paper explores these questions critically using case studies and asks whether dignity can be restored to the murder victim in a mediatized culture.

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
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3. Spicer, Valerie. and Ginther, Jordan. "Perceived Reality: A Spatial Approach Linking Human Perception with the Reality of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372196_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In 1997 the Grandview-Woodland Community Policing Centre, with the advice and support of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University conducted a community survey, asking 720 people 30 questions related to crime, public disorder and quality of life issues in the Commercial Drive area in Vancouver, British Columbia. Ten years later, the same survey was replicated in the same locations with 727 respondents. Although this neighborhood went through significant changes over these ten years, the opinions of respondents remained substantially the same. However, the survey also incorporated a mapping component in which people were asked to circle the area they felt had the highest level of crime in the neighborhood. The difference between the 1997 and 2007 perceptual maps is stark. Crime data is used to explore these maps and to further understand the intricate relationship between perception of crime and public disorder.

2013 - BEA Words: 211 words || 
Info
4. Lee, Hye Jin. "Un-Reality Television: Parodying Reality Television in Animated Cartoons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hotel (LVH), Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p631997_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Abstract: Whether it is the fabricated situations, exotic and/or isolated settings, or written scripts that encourage participants to “act” in a certain way, “reality” in reality television has always been a misnomer. Reality television’s authenticity or realism has been questioned since the beginning of the renaissance of reality television that was sparked by the popularity of Survivor in the summer of 2000. The contrivance of reality television became highly noted when various reality television shows that parody the conventions of reality television began to emerge, such as The Schmo Show, My Big Fat Obnoxious Fiance, and Straight Eye for the Queer Guy. Using hoaxes, false premises, or exaggerated characterizations based on stereotypes (which can be referred to as hyperstereotypes) these parodies highlight the contrivance of reality television and question its claim for authenticity. In the midst of these reality television parodies are two television animated series that shed light on the artificiality of reality television using the anti-realist mode of animation: Comedy Central’s Drawn Together (US, 2004-2008) and Teletoon’s Total Drama Island (Canada, 2007-2008). In this paper I examine how through genre mixing these two animated series parody the conventions of reality television and highlight reality television’s conceitedness through animated exaggeration and humor, problematizing the notion of “reality” in reality television.

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 42 pages || Words: 10689 words || 
Info
5. Baum, Matthew. "Reality Asserts Itself: Public Opinion on Iraq and the Elasticity of Reality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p279991_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Prevailing theories hold that U.S. public support for a war depends primarily on its degree of success, U.S. casualties, or conflict goals. Yet, research into the framing of foreign shows that public perceptions concerning each of these factors are often endogenous and malleable by elites. We argue that the qualities that make information persuasive vary over time. Early in a conflict, elites (especially the president) have an informational advantage. This renders public perceptions of “reality” very elastic. As events unfold and as the public gathers more information, this elasticity recedes, allowing alternative frames to challenge the administration’s preferred frame. We predict that over time the marginal impact of elite rhetoric and reality will decrease, although a sustained change in events may partially restore their influence. We test our argument through a content analysis of news coverage of the Iraq war from 2003 through 2007, an original survey of public attitudes regarding Iraq, and partially disaggregated data from over 200 surveys of public opinion on the war.

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