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2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Wu, Qiong (Miranda). and Wallace, Michael. "The Consequences of the Creative Class during the Great Recession: Was the Creative Class Recession-Proof?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1246140_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As the size of the creative class in the U.S labor force has increased in recent decades, the effects of the creative class have been hotly debated. Richard Florida highlighted the importance of the creative class in metropolitan areas even during the Great Recession. Rather than seeing the Great Recession as an economic disaster, he called it the ‘Great Reset’, which did not crimp the creative economy but accelerated the creative class to thrive. However, existing research has also provided evidence of negative effects of the GR on some certain creative industry. Whether the creative class as a whole or partially recession-proof compared to other class groupings is still open to question. In this paper, I examine the impact of the GR on the share of the creative class as a whole and its components in 312 U.S. metropolitan statistical areas. Controlling for appropriate covariates, the findings suggest that the share of the creative class has been losing ground, especially in the super creative cores, where they could rise more if there was not a hit from the Great Recession. But the creative professional occupations did not get much hurt during the Great Recession. The result is consistent with Florida’s theory supporting that the creative class occupations are immune to the Great Recession, but he overestimates that all creative class occupations are recession-proof.

2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 103 words || 
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2. Galaskiewicz, Joseph., Thompson-Dyck, Kendra. and Anderson, Kathryn. "The Great Recession Washes Across the Desert: A Study of Nonprofits, Governments, and Businesses Before, During, and After the Great Recession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1034164_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Great Recession (2008-09) impacted urban communities in the U.S. in many different ways. This paper focuses on the changes in organizational resources across neighborhoods and suburbs in the Phoenix-Mesa urbanized area. Our research questions are: which areas of the MSA experienced the greatest growth, decline, and recovery of organizational resources between 2003 and 2007, 2007 and 2009, and 2009 and 2013 respectively? Did for-profits, nonprofits, and government organizations experience the same fates? The units of analysis are 943census tracts in which are embedded thousands of establishments. We examine establishment/tract data for 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2013.

2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 184 words || 
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3. Jardel, Jacob. "Economies in Recess: Comparison Between America's Great Depression and Great Recession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548225_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With America’s current economic recession, many of its citizens hearken back in history to the Great Depression of 1930s, the worst economic downturn in U.S. history where real GDP declined 30 percent and unemployment rate reached 25 percent. The Depression was prolonged and the economy did not recover until the Second World War in 1942. The modern recession in 2007-2009 is the worst recession in the post-World War period. Real GDP declined by 6 percent and unemployment rate reached its highest level in 30 years. Because of its severity and similarity with Great Depression, some call it The Great Recession. Both the Depression and the Recession are similar in many respects. They both were very severe and prolonged. Unlike the other recessions, they both experienced financial crisis as well as bank failures. The purpose of this paper is to present historical overview of the Great Depression, lessons learned from it, and how it compares with the recent recession of 2007-2009. We will also examine different policies that were used to speed the economic recovery.

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