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2014 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
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1. Chavez, Mario. "Employment patterns employed by DACA recipients: What are the impacts of social capital on DACA recipient’s employment patterns?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Riverwalk, San Antonio, Texas, Apr 16, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that people who came to the US as children and meet certain criteria may request consideration for deferred action for two years and would be authorized for employment. This consideration is known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This study investigates the employment patterns and conditions that DACA recipients experience after receiving legal status. This study analyzes 15 in-depth qualitative interviews with DACA recipients that were recruited by utilizing snowball sampling technique to unpack these patterns and conditions. A social capital theory instrument, strength-of-weak-ties, was utilized to determine if the use of social capital yielded positive or negative results. The results of this study compliment social capital theory, solidify Strength-of-Weak-Ties theory, and particularly provide support for either weak or strong ties. By understanding this phenomenon (DACA) we may begin to understand the impact that this type of legislation may have on the lives of the remaining undocumented immigrants. Then we may stipulate its impact on the economy and create policy accordingly.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 3447 words || 
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2. Song, Rui. and Girard, Chris. "Welfare Reform and Recent Welfare Recipients: a Comparative Study of the Factors Associated with Welfare Recipients’ Employability between 1998 and 2002" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103787_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The 1996 welfare reform intends to move welfare recipients to work by imposing work requirements on recipients. To evaluate the effectiveness of the welfare reform, many researchers focus their study on welfare recipients’ employability. Kim (2000) examines the factors affecting the employment status of welfare recipients by using the March 1998 Annual Demographic Supplement File of CPS (Current Population Survey).
The authors in this paper extend Kim’s research by using the March 2002 CPS file to explore the factors associated with recent welfare recipients’ employment probability. A total of 1,353 welfare recipients were identified. The logistic regression revealed that recent welfare recipients with a high school degree have greater odds of finding a job compared to those without a high school degree. This finding differs from Kim’s study where there is no significant difference in the possibility of employment between recipients with and without a high school degree. The authors explain that this different finding is associated with the labor market circumstances of a specific period. That is, the poor labor market in 2002 provides an unfavorable environment so that compared to recipients with a high school degree, recipients without a high school degree show a significant disadvantage in finding a job.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 12002 words || 
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3. Knack, Stephen. "Donor Fragmentation and Bureaucratic Quality in Aid Recipients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We analyze the impact of donor fragmentation on the quality of government bureaucracy in aid-recipient nations. A formal model of a donor’s decision to hire government administrators to manage donor-funded projects predicts that the number of administrators hired declines as the donor’s share of other projects in the country increases, and as the donor’s concern for the success of other donors’ projects increases. These hypotheses are supported by cross-country empirical tests, using an index of bureaucratic quality available for aid-recipient nations over the 1982-2001 period.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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4. Hall, Steven. "The Politics of Tied Aid: Explaining Variation Between US Development Assistance Recipients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153275_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 12912 words || 
Info
5. Bearce, David. and Tirone, Daniel. "Foreign Aid, Recipient Growth, and the Strategic Goals of Donor Governments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209559_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract: This paper explores the puzzle of foreign aid effectiveness in promoting recipient economic growth. It argues that Western bilateral aid can be effective in this regard, but only when the strategic benefits associated with providing aid are small for donor governments. When the strategic benefits are large, donor governments cannot credibly push recipient governments to engage in politically-costly, but growth-enhancing, economic reform. This argument is supported by evidence showing that Western bilateral aid has become more effective in the post-1986 period when the strategic benefits of providing aid were small for Western governments as compared to the pre-1987 Cold War period. The argument is also supported by evidence showing that Western bilateral aid has become less temporally sticky after 1986, consistent with a new willingness on the part of Western donors to curtail their aid when recipient governments failed to engage in economic reform.

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