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2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 172 words || 
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1. Llewellyn, Jennifer. "Producing Reconciliation? The Work Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p557897_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was created as part of the largest class action claim settlement in Canadian history aimed at addressing the history and legacy of abuse within the Indian Residential School System. The Commission is tasked with creating as complete a historical record as possible of what happened in the schools and to produce a report detailing the history, purpose, operation and supervision of the IRS system, the effect and consequences of IRS (including systemic harms, intergenerational consequences and the impact on human dignity) and the ongoing legacy of the residential schools. All of this is done in the context of its named orientation toward reconciliation. This paper employs a relational theory lens to consider the meaning of reconciliation and the opportunities and challenges of the commission as a pathway toward it. Particular attention is paid to the Commission’s origin and position as part of a legal settlement and the effects and implications of this legal context for its potential with respect to reconciliation.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9055 words || 
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2. Roper, Steven. and Barria, Lilian. "The Use of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions in Africa: Does Establishing a Historical Record Lead to Reconciliation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179239_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although the use of truth and reconciliation commissions (TRCs) has grown considerably over the last three decades, there is still much that we do not know concerning the choice, the structuring and the effect of TRCs. While the literature has focused primarily on the effects of TRCs, we examine the domestic and the international factors influencing the choice of a commission in sub Saharan Africa from 1974 to 2003 using pooled cross-sectional time series. We find that states which adopted a TRC prior to South Africa were generally repressive, centralized regimes which used the truth commission as political cover. However, since South Africa’s TRC, transitional democracies, influenced by regional actors and the international community, have been more likely to adopt a truth commission. We conclude that the difference in state motivations before and after South Africa may assist in explaining the relative success and failure of commissions in Africa over the last thirty years.

2013 - The Law and Society Association Words: 339 words || 
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3. Ben Hounet, Yazid. "“Reconciliation is the Basis!” The Articulations between Courts and Unofficial Practices of Reconciliation (Algeria/Sudan)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, MA, May 30, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p644539_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My communication will focus on the practice of law and justice in the context of Algerian and Sudanese societies. I specifically aim at developing the study of interrelations between informal practices of reconciliation and judicial mechanisms. I use here the term "informal (or unofficial) practices of reconciliation" meaning cases of sulh implemented outside the framework of formal courts (state). Sulh is an Arabic term that can be defined by conciliation or reconciliation. It refers to the modalities of amicable settlement of conflicts. It is valued in the Koran, Islamic jurisprudences and customary practices ('urf) in Muslim contexts. I use here the notion of reconciliation since the case studied are those that deal wih the restoration or the attempt to restore a relationship destroyed by crime, offense - murder or injury.
I will in particular illustrate the idea that sulh practices are a continuation of judicial work and complement it. I propose to consider the multiplicity of actors, but also the spatial and temporal dimensions that guide the whole process, which articulates unofficial practices of reconciliation and those (official) of the courts of justice. Indeed, there are several places - crime scenes, scenes of reconciliation, courts - that orient the interpretation one has of the offense and the whole socio-legal process (reconciliation / justice courts).
I will put in parallel these practices (courts and unofficial practices of reconciliation), in order to highlight the similarities and differences, links and possible complementarities and oppositions. I will especially attempt at understanding why and how do these mechanisms exist and what information do they give about the meaning of reconciliation and justice, assigned by the actors in situated contexts. What are the argumentative sources (custom, Koran, etc.) invoked and in what context?
The main point this communication will aim at showing is that informal practices of reconciliation are not necessarily in opposition to the state justice, as they are not necessarily the signs of failure of the latter. Rather they work in a complementary manner, on another level, including in particular the idea of collective responsibility.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 305 words || 
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4. Lambourne, Wendy. "Reconciliation and Justice in East Timor: An Evaluation of the Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70160_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The East Timorese are emerging from a turbulent history comprising 450 years of Portuguese rule followed by civil war, invasion and 25 years of Indonesian occupation characterised by human rights abuses, massacres and violence such as that which followed the independence referendum in 1999. The population is divided politically between those who supported autonomy within Indonesia and those who supported independence. In the aftermath of the militia violence of 1999, there is a division between those who led the militia, those who followed, their families, and those who were targets of the militia violence. Reconciliation is needed between these different sectors of the East Timorese population, as well as between East and West Timorese, East Timorese and Indonesians more generally, and between East Timorese and those members of the international community such as Australia which supported the Indonesian annexation of East Timor and failed to prevent the subsequent violence and human right abuses. This paper will focus specifically on assessing the contribution of the Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation towards achieving reconciliation and justice for the East Timorese. The Commission, which is due to release its final report in October 2004, had three main purposes: to investigate human rights violations during the period between 25 April 1974 until 25 October 1999 (truth seeking); to assist in the reception and reintegration of those who committed lesser crimes (community reconciliation); and to report its findings and make policy recommendations to the East Timorese government for further action on reconciliation and the promotion of human rights. Based on interviews conducted with East Timorese in July 2004, this paper will comment on the effectiveness of the Commission and how its operations and impact have been affected by the lack of amnesty and concurrent operation of criminal accountability mechanisms in both Indonesia and East Timor.

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