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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 233 words || 
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1. Roybal, Carmela. and Valdez, R.. "Reducing Inequality Reduces American Indian and Alaska Native Suicide" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724941_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

Efforts to understand the sociology of suicide since Durkheim’s classic work have increasingly focused on ethnic or racial subgroups. This study contributes to this literature by examining the social environments that American Indians and Alaska Natives live in today that reflect a century of policies that segregated and marginalized tribal communities. By examining the role of American states’ predominant governance philosophies and redistributive policies as well as American Indian specific structural disadvantage reflecting federal trust polices, we test Durkheim’s social integration and regulation thesis. We examine the role of state government policies reflecting socially inclusive policies (i.e., state redistributive policies) and governance philosophies (i.e., liberal to conservative) that increase social regulation on the well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives by modeling state-level suicide counts between 2005 and 2010. Using a negative binomial regression analysis, we control for other relevant factors, such as a state’s human capital (e.g., education, employment). Data comes from multiple sources, including the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the 2000 U.S. Census. Findings suggest that fewer suicides are observed in states that have more liberal policy orientations and therefore tend to be more inclusive of their residents. Thus, state government ideologies and policies play an influential role in creating social environments that affect the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 44 words || 
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2. Lederman, Leandra. "Reducing Information Gaps to Reduce the Tax Gap: When Is Information Reporting Warranted?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This essay develops a framework for evaluating the efficiency of information reporting proposals, then evaluates how several current proposals fare under it. Accordingly, it makes recommendations on which proposals warrant serious consideration as revenue raisers that would help narrow the federal tax gap.

2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 162 words || 
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3. Chandler, Jennifer. "The Privacy-Security Trade-Off: Are We Increasing or Reducing National Security When We Reduce Individual Privacy Protection?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p175662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the assumption that a reduction in personal privacy is the necessary cost of improved national security. On the surface, it would seem uncontroversial that improved surveillance might assist a government in its law enforcement and national security efforts. Nevertheless, the relationship is not straightforward. First, a reduction in individual privacy may improve national security or law enforcement while creating new forms of insecurity. Second, a reduction in privacy might be an aspect of “security theatre” and might not actually produce any real improvements in national security or law enforcement. Third, a reduction in individual privacy may have distributional implications. While general security increases, certain individuals or groups may bear the bulk of the costs of the privacy reduction – for example, by being disproportionately included in the false positives turned up by government surveillance schemes. The paper will seek to make explicit the complexities hidden within the trade-off between privacy and security.

2009 - International Marine Conservation Congress Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1482 words || 
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4. Johnson, Ayana. "Fish traps with escape gaps: reducing bycatch without reducing value" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Marine Conservation Congress, George Madison University, Fairfax, Virginia, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p296911_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Trap fishing takes place daily on the world’s coral reefs with high levels of bycatch. Due to the negative effects of this fishery, the island of Curaçao may require that all fish traps have escape gaps for juvenile and narrow-bodied fishes. To provide information on the ecological and economic implications of this proposed regulation, I conducted an experiment comparing the catch of three types of fish traps: traditional (control) traps, traps with the proposed 20cm by 2.5cm escape gaps, and traps with 40cm by 2.5cm escape gaps. Seven weeks of data were collected at three sites, representing 3,336 observations of fish. Escape gaps effectively reduce the catch of both narrow-bodied and low-value fishes, without significantly reducing the catch of high-value fishes. Fishes caught in traps with escape gaps are 21 to 26 percent longer than those in control traps. Although escape gaps do reduce the quantity of fishes caught, there is no significant difference across trap types in either the number of high-value fishes caught or in the overall catch value. Fishermen could use escape gap traps without decreasing their incomes. However, even with escape gaps, trap fishing could have negative impacts on coral reef health, as the catch of all trap types is dominated by parrotfish, ecologically important herbivores.

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