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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 8817 words || 
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1. Brunet-Jailly, Emmanuel. "Economic Integration and the Governance of Cross-Border Regions: Forms and Functions of Cross-Border Urban Regions - North American Functional Regions, European Territorial Regions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66032_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is about the forms and functions of city-regions, and the common mismatch of the variable geometries of economic spaces, and, political and institutional spaces. The purpose of this research is to assess the various institutional mechanisms that exist in 6 cross-border urban regions on the Canadian-American border: Detroit-Windsor, Niagara, and Vancouver-Seattle; on the American-Mexican border: San Diego-Tijuana; and on the Franco-Belgian and Dutch-German borders in Lille-Courtrai and Enshede-Gronau.
The twenty first century new global economy seems to give metropolitan regions a new central role. City regions result from the multitude of points of convergence and confluence of large economic and social networks. In Jane Jacobs's words, cities and their economic regions make the wealth of nations, and yet, often, their governmental structures and functions do not mirror those important urban social, political, and economic and spatial facts. Most cities' institutional and functional boundaries do not overlap with the needs of their economic regions. Moreover, there are very few examples of clear institutional and functional frameworks presiding over large cross-border urban regions. This paper addresses the following question: does free trade, and particularly continental economic integration in North American and Europe, lead to a progressive transformation of the regional economies of the six cross-border regions presented in this study? Does economic integration, in turn, affects the forms and functions of the local and regional governance of these regions. Thus for instance, is the European Union free trade regime enhancing territorially based multifunctional institutions, while on the contrary, the NAFTA fosters local informal, uni-functional, and non-territorially based institutions?

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5473 words || 
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2. Fattore, Christina. "A New Kind of Regionalism: The European Regional Development Fund and Its Impact on the Economically Lagging Regions of the European Union" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73290_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While most scholars agree that the European Regional Development Fund has not aided in economic convergence at the subnational regional level within the European Union, there is some disagreement about why it was so ineffective. The strongest argument asserts that there are allocation problems, in that the grant monies are not being distributed to those regions that are truly in need of such help. Instead, such scholars claim that larger states that are the net contributors to the annual EU budget are able to demand a larger portion of the ERDF than they are supposed to receive according to EU guidelines for distribution. I explore this question empirically, using data for ERDF disbursements for twelve EU members in the years 1975-1995. I find that there are no real distribution problems: a larger portion of the ERDF is being distributed to the states with the most lagging regions. However, I suggest exploring other reasons why the ERDF has proven to be ineffective.

2006 - International Studies Association Words: 236 words || 
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3. Kingah, Stephen. "Are Micro-Regionalism, Regionalism and Inter-Regionalism Palliatives to Redress Africa?s Exclusion in the Globalization Process?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100780_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Globalization ushers opportunities and poses challenges that international subjects cannot avoid. It is discomforting to note that some African countries remain distant from the overtures of global trends and instead succumb to the vagaries of untamed liberalism. My point of departure is that globalisation is very good for Africa and that the essence of globalisation is defeated if Africa is excluded or excludes itself from this pool of extant possibilities. In addition, I contend that reasons for Africa?s docility in arresting opportunities are internal as well as external. To triumph over the challenges of globalization will entail a tailoring of initiatives that respond to the nature of the obstacles, be these deficits in political, corporate or social governance. Thereafter, I surmise that most African states will need to consider regionalist strategies as remedies to the sclerosis of exclusion in the globalization process. These strategies include micro-regionalism (trans-national cooperation of sub-state entities, for example links between Bobbo in Burkina Faso and Sikaso in Mali), regionalism (inter state exchange for example the African Union) and inter-regionalism (socio-economic communion of regional entities, for instance the EU-AU Dialogue). These three dimensions coalesce both inside-out and outside-in alternatives as responses to the Africa?s relative ostracization from the globalization bandwagon. I argue that strengthening decent decentralised local structures without discounting external mechanisms of cohesion will provide Africa the requisite double-edged sword of honouring local realities while embracing globalisation in an apposite manner.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 36 words || 
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4. Martyn, Regina. "Regional Integration in West Africa: Challenges and Prospects on the Road from Regional Rhetoric to Regional Reality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p84611_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many observers view regional integration in West Africa as the only way to reverse the region?s economic marginalization in the global economy. This paper examines the viability of West Africa?s state-driven institutional approach to integration.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 50 pages || Words: 15443 words || 
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5. Perez-Linan, Anibal. "Why Regions of the World are Important:Regional Specificities and Region-Wide Diffusion of Democracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152685_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: In this paper we build an explicit defense of the importance of regions in comparative politics. We present two reasons to take regions of the world seriously. First, regions have particular dynamics that are specific to them (i.e. regional causal heterogeneity). Second, political developments in one country can have a strong impact on other countries in the same region (i.e. regional diffusion). We demonstrate those arguments by analyzing processes of democratization. Using a hierarchical model and a world-wide sample of countries for 1950-2003, we show that the effect of economic development on democratization has varied across regions. We also use rare-event logistic regression models to show that the probability of democratic transitions and breakdowns in the Latin American countries has varied with the evolution of the regional environment.

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