Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 165 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 33 - Next  Jump:
2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 311 words || 
Info
1. Harrison, Chase. and Packman, Lauren. "Coverage Bias in Telephone Samples of Registered Voters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116287_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we assess the relative advantages and biases of two different commonly used sampling methodologies for conducting telephone pre-election polls among registered voters. Both random-digit-dial (RDD) and voter-listed sampling methods suffer from different types of coverage bias. We delineate the problems with these two methods from a survey sampling perspective, and compare and contrast respondents drawn from these methods. We also test theoretical models of survey response as explanations of differences between these samples.

Different protocols are typically employed to obtain samples of registered voters. Some researchers use official lists of registered voters as a sample frame, while others use RDD samples combined with respondent reports of voter registration status. Since voter telephone lists exclude respondents with listed telephone numbers, these samples will have undercoverage. Although RDD telephone samples contain nearly complete coverage of registered voters, respondent screening of voter registration status inevitably leads to over-reporting. (Belli et. al., 1999) Consequently, voter lists exclude registered voters without listed telephone numbers from the survey population, while RDD surveys include these individuals, but also contain people who should be excluded because they are not registered to vote.

In this paper, we will compare and contrast survey respondents and responses from these two sampling methods on a variety of measures, including political opinions, actual and reported behaviors, and demographic measures We will also model the differences in these two survey populations as functions of non-response bias, and social desirability bias.

Data are drawn from a series of pre-election surveys conducted by the University of Connecticut Center for Survey Research and Analysis (CSRA) in October and November, 2002. All surveys were administered using a dual overlapping frame design that included both an RDD and a voter list frame. We will treat these frames as different experimental groups for purposes of our analysis.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 8 pages || Words: 3278 words || 
Info
2. Caputo, David. and Trichter, Jonathan. "The Newly Registered Voter and Political Participation in the 2004 Presidential Election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41524_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One will be uploaded shortly.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document
Supporting Document

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5134 words || 
Info
3. Kmec, Julie. "Affirmative Action, Job Race-Sex Composition, and Wages: Evidence from a Study of Registered Nurses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108702_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I investigate the relationship between job race-sex composition and the hourly wages of registered nurses (RNs). In addition, I consider how this relationship differs in hospitals that do and do not take affirmative action to increase underrepresented groups—men and racial minorities—in RN positions. Analyses using data from roughly 300 RNs in 80 hospitals in two Pacific Northwest states find as the percent of minority and white female RNs increases, RN wages decrease net of individual, human capital, and job and hospital-level attributes. In hospitals that take affirmative action to increase male and minority RN representation, on the other hand, job race-sex composition is not significantly related to RN hourly wages. I discuss how organizational policies, in particular hospital affirmative action efforts, are one organizational mechanism whereby wages are linked to a job’s social composition.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 306 words || 
Info
4. Ioanide, Paula. "Spectating Suffering, (Not) Registering Violation: Cultural Fantasies and Pleasure in Viewing the Abu Ghraib Photographs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Oct 12, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114590_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The photographic exhibition of Abu Ghraib as a state of exception—a site constituted by the US liberal democratic state where the permissibility to strip prisoners of various forms of psychic, social and/or corporeal life was integral to the Global War on Terror—raises complicated questions about modes of spectating the suffering of non-American subjects. In examining modalities of viewing the Abu Ghraib photographs released to the American public, this paper considers the role of American cultural fantasies of Muslims and the Middle East in viewing the violated Abu Ghraib prisoners in the photographs. If cultural fantasies play a complex role in structuring intelligibilities, in informing and normalizing the ways subjects see each other, the assumptions subjects implicitly make, the fears and desires subjects have of each other, this paper focuses on those cultural fantasies that contributed to forms of spectatorship that 1) could not register the Abu Ghraib tortures as violations and/or 2) viewed the instrumentality of Abu Ghraib prisoners as permissible and/or justified. The American public fascination with the Abu Ghraib photographs—particularly with their representations of sexual violation—suggests that the photographs are part of a historical genealogical legacy where the public viewing of sexually violated bodies functions as a mechanism that binds collective anxieties raised by racial, gendered and national conflicts. (The public practice of lynching in the US is the first example that comes to mind.) This paper considers correlations between national and transnational scenes of spectatorship, between historical and contemporary mechanisms of viewing violated bodies. The public viewing of the Abu Ghraib photographs also raises difficult questions about forms of pleasure (individual and collective) derived from watching violated bodies. The essay interrogates the role viewing pleasures play in sustaining and (re)producing American geopolitical states of exception like Abu Ghraib; and in how such pleasures affect possibilities for developing ethical forms of witnessing others’ suffering.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 7884 words || 
Info
5. Bae, Hyuhn-Suhck., Moon, Hyun-Joo. and Bae, Eun-Gyuhl. "The Effects of Emotion and Issue Involvement on Entertainment-Education Viewers Intention to Register as Cornea Donors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69011_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study was designed to examine the role of emotional responses to an Entertainment-Education show about cornea donation, issue involvement, and the three components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, in predicting intentions to pledge cornea donation. The decomposition of effects for the latent constructs confirms that sympathy and empathy responses are the catalyst for issue involvement in the context of organ donation, and issue involvement is an important intermediary in the persuasion process. Issue involvement is also a common causal antecedent of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. The findings of this study suggest that adding emotion and involvement in the Theory of Planned Behavior enhances the explanatory power of the theory in predicting intentions, which indicate the possibility of combining the Elaboration Likelihood Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior in the prediction of human behaviors. This study also emphasizes the importance of emotion and issue involvement in identifying the why and how issue of the Entertainment-Education investigations.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 33 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy