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2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 402 words || 
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1. Hill, David. "An Initial Exploration of the Effect of Automatic Registration on State Level Registration and Turnout" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329605_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars of American turnout concluded long ago that our system of voluntary registration was one of the main factors behind the comparatively low turnout in American national elections (Mitchell and Wlezien 1995; Powell 1986; Wolfinger and Rosenstone 1980). These scholars contended that if US voting and registration laws were fully liberalized, turnout in American national elections would approach that of other industrialized democracies. Powell (1986) estimated that if automatic registration were implemented at the national level in the United States turnout in presidential elections would increase by approximately 10 percentage points. Since the 1980s, the restrictiveness of voting and registration laws has loosened somewhat with the implementation of the National Voter Registration Act in 1995, the implementation of Election/Same Day Registration in several states, and the expansion of early and mail-in voting. In 2015, Oregon became the first state to adopt automatic registration and California followed suit that very same year. In both states, automatic registration is an “opt out” process: when a citizen applies for, renews or replaces a driver’s license, permit or identification card, his/her name is placed on the state’s registration rolls unless that citizen chooses to decline or opt out. Since 2015, another eight states and the District of Columbia have adopted similar processes (AK: 2016, CO: 2016; CT: 2016; DC: 2016; GA: 2016; IL: 2017; RI: 2017, VT: 2016; WV: 2016).

The proposed paper will be an intitial examination of whether or not the implementation of automatic registration led to an increase in 1) the percentage of the state population registered to vote and 2) the percentage of the state voting eligible population casting a ballot in the November 8, 2016 national election. Only four states implemented the procedures prior to the 2016 election (Oregon, California, Vermont, and West Virginia), and thus these are the only states in which the reform could have an effect. Because this reform should affect turnout indirectly through registration rates, any effects in the 2016 election should be muted. There simply hasn’t been enough time for the reform to increase the size of the registered population. Because Oregon and California had the reform in place at least a year prior to the election, any effects should be greater than those in Vermont and West Virginia. When completed, the proposed paper will provide an initial assessment of the ability of this crucial reform to increase turnout in American elections.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 215 words || 
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2. Merivaki, Thessalia. "Uncovering implementation problems in voter registration: the case of youth pre-registration in Florida" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1325552_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Until recently, there has been little emphasis on the success of voter registration with respect to processing voter registration applications, as well as the implications of voter registration success for efficient election administration. While the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) offers guidelines regarding the timely transmission of voter registration applications from various agencies to the state election officials, it does not provide guidance to the states with respect to how voter registration applications submitted during an election cycle should be processed. States additionally facilitate access to voter registration with several reforms, including youth pre-registration, which allows eligible youth to register to vote prior to their 18th birthday. This paper explores the impact of implementation of Florida’s youth pre-registration laws on voter registration rejections prior to the 2008 Presidential election. Using Miami-Dade and Hillsborough counties as a pilot case study, I analyze pending and invalid voter registration applications processed between November 2007 and September 2008. I find evidence of inconsistent implementation at the county level which appears to result from a gap in the effective date of Florida’s more expansive pre-registration law, thus leaving 16 year old applicants more vulnerable to having their voter registration applications rejected. These preliminary findings suggest that even minor issues with implementing voter registration laws can lead to disenfranchising eligible voters.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6989 words || 
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3. Waismel-Manor, Israel. "Getting into the Voting Rights Act: The Availability of Translated Registration Materials and its Impact on Minority Voter Registration and Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211716_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Given the centrality of the Voting Rights Act for the incorporation of ethnic /racial minorities into American electoral politics, we know remarkably little about the implementation of the act at the state and local level. This paper 1) examines voter access for language minorities under Section 203 of the VRA, which guarantees registration and election materials will be made available in select languages other than English in covered jurisdictions; and 2) analyzes original data, collected from 96 covered counties in 15 states, on the actual availability, determined by on-site field visits, of translated registration materials; and 3) determines the impact the availability of translated registration materials on minority voter registration and electoral turnout, using data on registration and voting data for Spanish-surnamed voters by county, supplemented by Census data.

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