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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,356 records.
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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7324 words || 
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1. Farrell, Justin. and Beyerlein, Kraig. "Religion Fought the Law and the Law Won: Religion as a Barrier to Social-Movement Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410130_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I focus on the potential of religion to undermine social movement participation. One important pathway through which religion is likely to hinder social movement participation is the cultivation of obedient attitudes toward authority, especially the government and its laws. Given this and the fact that social movement studies have identified these attitudes to curtail taking to the streets to protest, it is reasonable to expect that religion can function as a constraint for social movement activism. However, not all dimensions of religion should promote obedient attitudes toward authority. I expect three mechanisms in particular to have a strong effect on these attitudes and thus be a barrier to social movement participation: (1) Religion discourages criminal behavior. (2) Religion teaches obedience to authority. (3) Religion instills self-control and self-regulation. We draw on the broader literature on religion, deviance, and crime to develop a theoretical framework to explain how these three mechanisms shape obedient attitudes on authority.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 130 words || 
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2. Suh, Daniel. "Religion and Happiness: Support for a Durkheimian Theory of Religion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p716917_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Abstract: Using panel data taken from the General Social Survey for 2006 to 2010, this paper examines non-affiliation with religion and its association with happiness. Previous studies document the increase of religious non-affiliates in the contemporary United States. However, a Durkheimian approach to religion contends that religion is a social phenomenon grounded in sociality and collective consciousness. Examining religious non-affiliates provides an ideal test of the general theory. The data shows that respondents with no religious affiliation score lower than other respondents in their reported levels of happiness. In addition, consistent with extant research, attendance has a significant positive association with happiness. Both affiliation and religious participation, in the form of attendance of religious services, indicate the inherent social nature of both religion and happiness.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 9443 words || 
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3. Thomas, Scott. "Was September 11 About Religion or was it About Something Else: explaining and understanding culture and religion in international relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72477_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper uses the distinction Martin Hollis and Steve Smith make between explaining international relations from the outside, and understanding international relations from the inside as the basis for reconsidering the place of culture and religion in international relations theory. It shows how much of the literature in the first year or so after September 11 fits into these two appraoches. It argues, however, that interpretative approaches can bring out the relevance of some aspects of social constructivism for understanding culture and religion in international relations as well as its limits. Some of these limits can be more clearly seen when culture and religion are examined using Alasdair MacIntyre's narrative theory of idenity and social action, and so the paper ends up by applying MacIntre's narrative approach to understanding the September 11 tragedy.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 1 pages || Words: 440 words || 
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4. Bender, Courtney. "Table 07. Religion at the Edge: Expanding the Boundaries of the Sociology of Religion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p238682_index.html>
Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Abstract: This roundtable aims to broaden a developing conversation about how sociologists conceptualize and study religion across the discipline. While a great deal of research about religion is being conducted by sociologists of religion, many other sociologists are expanding the substantive focus of the religious in sociology and the theoretical, methodological, and conceptual apparatus sociologists use to engage questions about religion. Sociologists studying religion in different sections of the discipline do not necessarily often (or ever) find themselves in conversations with others in the field who are working on topics and issues related to religion. As such, emergent work about religion remains surprisingly at the "edge" of sub-disciplinary conversations about religion. This informal roundtable will invite any and all interested sociologists researching religion to a conversation about the state of the field.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 5312 words || 
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5. Taylor, James. and Hall, Precious. "On Trust, It’s a Matter of Religion: The Effect of Religion on Political Trust" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p545006_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Political trust is an important aspect of democratic government. Research demonstrates that political trust has significant effects on public policy outcomes such as social spending. What is less clear, however, are the determinants of political trust—particularly through social institutions. This paper attempts to address this gap in the literature. To do so we take into account the effect of different types of religious institutions because they are places where important civic skills are built and exercised. We hypothesize that religious institutions should have differing effects among African-Americans given the history of the church as a source of political empowerment. Testing our theory using NES data and ordered logit models, we find preliminary evidence for our theory, and suggest ways to improve the research going forward.

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