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2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8966 words || 
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1. Hungerford, Kristen. "Discussions of Religio-Moral Objections to Abortion: A Feminist Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492152_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abortion has long been contested in the United States. This issue has been greatly debated in political, medical, ethical, and religious forums. In particular, American television has portrayed such positions pertaining to the issue of abortion. By examining an untapped area of research, this study is the first to evaluate portrayals of women contemplating abortion in prime time medical dramas. Specifically, depictions of gender roles and messages of religo-moral objections to abortion were evaluated. Overall, these mediated messages convey the notion of abortion as wrong, immoral, and sacrilegious. Furthermore, women characters are portrayed as being subjected to the “expertise” of the “heroic” male physician characters; thereby, these portrayals further perpetuate patriarchal constructions in American popular culture.

2009 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1123 words || 
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2. Witherspoon, Noelle. "Spiritual W.E.A.P.O.N.S: The Role of Black American Religio-spirituality in the Administration of Black Female Principals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, Nov 19, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378620_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using narrative analysis, the intersectionality of gender, race, and religio-spirituality highlighted the relationship of past and current religio-spiritual leadership practices that contest the status quo of most U.S. schools. Four texts written as spiritual narratives illuminate the continuing tradition of religio-spirituality as a “weapon.” As metaphor, “weapon” represents religio-spirituality as a means to challenge naïve, conservative, androcentric, business models ubiquitous in our increasingly complex society (Shields, 2004). As an acronym of the findings, W.E.A.P.O.N.S represents Word, Wisdom and Witness; Ethics of Religio-spirituality; Armor and Activism; Perseverance and Prayer; Ontology and Epistemology; Naming; and Spiritual Fruit. Our study contributes to reconceptualizing educational administration by emphasizing the voices of Black women principals.

2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 222 words || 
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3. Sheldon, Myrna. "How Did Gender and Sexuality Become Weapons on the American Religio-Political Scene?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1017523_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Sex, gender and sexuality have been among the most contentious topics in American culture from the 1970s until the present. These themes made their way into American political conversations by way of the women’s and gay rights movements, new biological sciences of sex and the transformation of social gender roles. Although these lenses remain crucial, this paper examines the role of religion in the reshaping of American discourses on gender in this period. Specifically, I explore the process by which religious identities and communities were politicized around issues of gender in this period, highlighting the creation of a new religious community called “evangelical Christians” around the issue of abortion. Paradoxically (and often tragically), this politicization was a self-erasing process, such that new religious political identifies were transformed into essentialist definitions of religious beliefs. We focus on this paradox in order to explore the creation of a twin set of miseries. For practitioners, this politicization prevented queer identities from belonging in their own religious communities, institutions and families. And for the broader American political dialogue, attempts to champion gendered and queer voices and bodies were framed as attacks on American religious communities. My aim is to uncover the historical, sociological and anthropological dimension of this politicization in order to open up a non-essentialist dialogue on the relationship between religious, queer and gender identities.

2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 232 words || 
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4. Mazanec, Thomas. "Money, Merit, and Meter: On Religio-Literary Exchange in Late Medieval China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1073758_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Buddhist monks were among the most well-connected individuals in the literary world of late medieval China (840–960 CE). When we look at records of exchange poetry, we discover that they are brokers, centralized hubs which connect otherwise disparate poets. But why should this be the case? After all, didn’t monks claim to have cut themselves off from society, forsaking all worldly ties? The reason for their centrality, I argue, is that the writing of poems on monks and temples was seen as a merit-making activity. Poetry, along with physical money and religious merit, was one of the major forms of currency in the late Táng, spoken of in economic terms such as “debt” and “capital”. And poetry, like merit and money, could be produced through hard work and was exchangeable for goods, services, or any of the other forms of currency. In this paper, I look at a wide variety of sources – poems, prefaces, essays, insciptions, contracts – to establish the fundamental fungibility between money, merit, and meter, and examine the economy of rituals, scribal practices, and exchange poetry. My central claim is that the writing of poetry came to be seen as an economic as much as an aesthetic activity in the late Táng: it had value, concrete value which could be directly traded for very real benefits. Poets and monks, even more than merchants, were the creators of wealth.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 27 pages || Words: 8217 words || 
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5. Bailey, David. "Rethinking Religio-Political Rhetoric: Civil Religion or Religious Rhetorical Form?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191193_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This essay revisits Civil Religion as applied in the American context by sociologist Robert N. Bellah. While the idea has been both lauded and criticized, it has become the dominant theoretical conceptualization of religious rhetoric in political discourse. While the concept remains theoretically and methodologically valid, several case studies of historical and contemporary presidential rhetoric suggest that a new theoretical conceptualization—religious rhetorical form—may prove more fruitful, particularly in instances of contemporary presidential rhetoric.

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