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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 31 words || 
Info
1. Remmel, Megan. "The Reliability of Self-Reported Personality Responses in Political Elites Using Second-Hand Reports to Investigate the Utility of State Legislators’ Self-Reported Personality Inventories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1347480_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I investigate the validity and reliability of employing personality inventories completed by state legislators. I compare personality inventories completed by state legislators with reports from their spouses, children, friends, and coworkers.

2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 160 words || 
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2. Maslov, Anton. "Property Crime Reporting in Canada: Examining the Effects of Victims' Perception of their Social Context on their Reporting Behaviour" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181678_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It has been consistently documented that much of the property crime in Canada and in the Western world in general is not being brought to the attention of the police. Three approaches were taken in past research to examine the factors contributing to crime reporting behaviour – the economical, psychological, and sociological. This project merges the three approaches under the assumption offered by a socio-ecological framework, which asserts that characteristics of victims, offenders, incidents, and social contexts of neighbourhoods will influence victims’ reporting behaviour. Victims are assumed to form the decision to notify the police of incidents through rational or normative processes.

Data from the Canadian General Social Survey cycle 18 (2004) were used to examine the reporting behaviour of property crimes in Canada. Results of multivariate logistic regressions indicate that the effects of incident characteristics predominately affect victims’ crime-reporting behaviour; however, to a limited extent, the effects of individual and social context characteristics affect the reporting behaviour as well.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 107 words || 
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3. Leippe, Michael. and Eisenstadt, Donna. "An eyewitness ease-of-retrieval effect: Memory report difficulty influences identification confidence and reports of memory conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482594_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: College students witnessed a videotaped theft, provided a cued-recall report of the theft in response to difficult or easy questions, attempted a photo-lineup identification, and, answered confidence-related questions. Regardless of whether the thief was present or absent in the lineup, choosers reported less identification confidence and more challenging viewing and identification experiences when the memory test was difficult compared to easy. This supports the cue-belief model that asserts that eyewitnesses’ beliefs about face recognition are informed by intrinsic meta-memory cues. As in other domains, subjective retrieval difficulty apparently served as a cue about a self-belief, in this case quality of memory about the criminal.

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 103 words || 
Info
4. Leippe, Michael. and Eisenstadt, Donna. "Memory report difficulty, identification confidence, and retrospective reports of memory conditions: An eyewitness ease-of-retrieval effect" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399167_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: College students witnessed a videotaped theft, provided a cued-recall report of the theft in response to difficult or easy questions, attempted an identification from a thief-present or thief-absent photo-lineup, and answered confidence-related questions. Regardless of lineup, choosers reported less identification confidence and more difficult viewing and identification experiences when the memory test was difficult compared to easy. This supports the cue-belief model that asserts that eyewitnesses’ beliefs about face recognition are informed by intrinsic meta-memory cues. As in other domains, subjective retrieval difficulty apparently served as a cue about a self-belief, in this case quality of memory about the criminal.

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