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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 31 words || 
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1. Remmel, Megan. "The Reliability of Self-Reported Personality Responses in Political Elites Using Second-Hand Reports to Investigate the Utility of State Legislators’ Self-Reported Personality Inventories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1347480_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I investigate the validity and reliability of employing personality inventories completed by state legislators. I compare personality inventories completed by state legislators with reports from their spouses, children, friends, and coworkers.

2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 8834 words || 
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2. Wenzel, Andrea., Ford, Sam. and Nechushtai, Efrat. "Report for America, report about communities: local news capacity and community trust" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1553641_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study looks at Report for America’s efforts to strengthen the capacity of local news and increase trust from the perspective of a neighborhood on Chicago’s West Side, and a rural county in Eastern Kentucky. Using a communication infrastructure theory framework, it follows 28 residents through project-start and end focus groups. This is complemented by 15 interviews with journalists and RFA staff, and content analysis of local stories from the Chicago Sun-Times and Lexington Herald-Leader.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Pages: 5 pages || Words: 1383 words || 
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3. Heide, Kathleen. and Boots, Denise. "A Comparative Analysis of Media Reports of U.S. Parricide Cases with Officially Reported National Crime Data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 13, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p185593_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper offers a content analysis of electronic news reports of parricide cases occurring in the United States. An extensive search of online databases identified 150 unique cases of children killing parents reported in the news media. Data pertaining to incidents, case-related variables (e.g., weapons used, other charges) and the processing of offenders from the initial charge through conviction and sentencing are examined in this article. To the extent possible, media accounts are used to classify cases according to motive and Heide’s three types of parricide offenders (severely abused, severely mentally ill, and dangerously antisocial). The accuracy of online coverage of U.S. parricide incidents is assessed using two types of resources: officially reported national statistics on known parricidal incidents and the psychological/psychiatric literature on matricide and patricide. Comparisons of news accounts of media-reported U.S. parricide cases with Supplementary Homicide Report data indicated, as predicted by media and crime experts, that electronic media coverage of parricide cases focused on the more sensational, horrifying, and unusual parricides, namely those incidents involving multiple victims, multiple offenders, juvenile offenders, and female killers. Analyses of these media accounts by offender age found 13 significant differences between juvenile and adult parricide offenders. Ten of these 13 differences related to motive and Heide’s parricide offender types and were consistent with the mental health related literature in this area. The limitations and directions for future research are discussed at length.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 276 words || 
Info
4. Carley-Baxter, Lisa., Passaro, Doug., Levy, Paul., Twiddy, Susan. and Hershow, Ron. "Impact of Reports of Hepatitis B Vaccination on Hepatitis A Vaccination Reports" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p16925_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B are both viral diseases affecting the liver, however they are transmitted via different means and often result in different spectra of health effects once infected. Vaccinations are available for each of these diseases. It is hypothesized that many lay people are not familiar with differences between Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B and may confuse them due to the similarity of their names. For this paper, we report the results of an experiment that was conducted in the fall of 2004 embedded within a retrospective study of childhood vaccination to determine whether reports of Hepatitis A vaccination were influenced by the inclusion of questions about Hepatitis B vaccination.

This random-digit-dial survey was conducted with parents of children between 2.5 and 15 years of age. Parents were asked for reports of childhood vaccinations, permission to contact medical care providers to obtain data on these vaccinations, and the demographic characteristics of the household. Interviews were completed with 650 households, representing approximately 1,200 children, in Arizona and Oregon. These states were chosen because of their high incidence rates of hepatitis A. For those cases where parental permission was obtained, medical care providers were contacted to obtain vaccination records for the children.

We further investigate whether these vaccination reports differ by demographic characteristics, the number and age of children, presence of shot records, and the number of vaccination providers. We extend this analysis by also investigating the accuracy of the reports of Hepatitis A vaccinations from parents who were also asked the Hepatitis B questions. Finally, we compare parent and provider reports of Hepatitis A vaccinations.

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