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2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 524 words || 
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1. Collins-Warfield, Amy. "Reconsidering "multicultural" requirements: Accounting for international students in required multicultural education courses at U.S. 4-year higher education institutions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Apr 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-03-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551030_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the legacies of the international education revolution is the increased mobility of international students seeking to complete their coursework outside of their home country. The number of international students studying in American institutions of higher education is ever increasing, with 690,923 students studying in the US during the 2009-2010 academic year (Institute of International Education, 2010). Literature suggests that the presence of international students at America’s colleges and universities is beneficial both to the individual student and the university as a whole. For example, Museus and Harris (2010) conclude that exposure to diverse cultures can create “academically challenging and educationally rich learning environments for all students” (p. 33). On-campus exposure to an array of cultures can help prepare students for working in a globalized world. To further prepare students, many 4-year institutions have implemented formal multicultural diversity education requirements. For example, students may be required to select a general education course that addresses issues of multiculturalism, power, and/or privilege (e.g., the Social Diversity in the United States requirement at The Ohio State University). Both domestic and foreign students are required to enroll in such classes. What is often not taken into consideration, however, is that many frameworks for multicultural education are focused more on assimilation into the dominant culture than on exploring, understanding, and respecting different cultures (Gorski, 2008). Additionally, many of the student development theories utilized to support these multicultural education experiences are based on a White, American, middle class model (Evans, Forney, Guido, Patton, Renn, 2010). Although the literature addresses and is critical of the current multicultural discourse (e.g., Gorski, 2008; Grant & Sleeter, 2006), it does not connect these multicultural education courses to the experiences of international students. From this gap in the literature, several questions arise, including: are international students being exposed to models or concepts of multiculturalism and diversity that do not resonate with them or connect to their experiences? Do international students have less to gain from what is otherwise a valuable experience for their domestic peers? While enrolled in such courses, do international students feel less able to contribute, or might they believe their contributions are unwelcome? Could international students be completely alienated by such a course? This paper aims to establish a literature review by drawing on existing research from multiple disciplines, including higher education, student development theory, and multicultural education. This paper will lay a framework for a future empirical study of undergraduate international students’ experiences in multicultural courses. This framework will further the theoretical discussion of multicultural education by introducing the important yet heretofore overlooked dynamic of international students. It will serve as a starting point for considering the potentially unique perspective of international students in multicultural education courses and the implications for practice. This paper will further our thinking regarding the ways in which we can best serve our international students, as well as the costs and benefits of undergraduate multicultural education. Ultimately, this paper also has broader implications for any higher education institution around the world where undergraduate multicultural education coursework is required.

2007 - American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Words: 248 words || 
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2. Hall, Philip. and White, Roger. "Completion of pre-pharmacy requirements at community colleges (CC): what is the association with PharmD GPA?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, Jul 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-03-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p196181_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Barron’s Profiles ranks the competitiveness of undergraduate (UG) institutions; however, community colleges (CC) are not included. Previously, we found that UG-GPA and PCAT were associated with PharmD GPA (COP-GPA) in each didactic year (P1-P3); however, only UG-GPA and UG ranking were associated for P4. Since some applicants complete pre-pharmacy requirements at CC, we evaluated UG ranking and CC attendance as a predictor of performance in a PharmD program.
METHODS: We evaluated relationships between UG ranking and GPAs of 2003-06 PharmD graduates. UG institutions at which these graduates completed pre-pharmacy courses were categorized and ranked as follows: most competitive (MC=5), highly competitive (HC=4), very competitive (VC=3), competitive (C=2), less competitive (LC=1) and community college (CC=0). Relationships between UG-GPA, PCAT, UG ranking and PharmD GPA were assessed by univariate and multivariate regression. RESULTS: Records were available for 191 students (MC=2, HC=79, VC=33, C=43, LC=10, CC=24) from 67 institutions. Mean P4 GPAs were: MC=3.6, HC=3.4, VC=3.2, C=3.3, LC=2.7, CC=3.1). By univariate analysis, UG-GPA(p<0.0001), PCAT (p<0.0001) and UG ranking (p=0.0003-0.0069) were associated with GPA in each year (P1-P4). R2 values for P1-P3 were consistent for UG-GPA (0.328-0.355), PCAT (0.248-0.285) and UG ranking (0.038-0,047), but lower for UG-GPA (0.016) and PCAT (0.126) and higher for UG ranking (0.069) for P4. Multivariate analysis found only UG-GPA and PCAT significant for P1-P3 GPA. In P4, UG ranking and CC attendance were also significant.
CONCLUSIONS: When UG-GPA and PCAT are used, UG ranking and CC attendance was associated with PharmD GPA only in the P4 year.

2007 - American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Words: 48 words || 
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3. Nunez, Mario. "No Foreign Language Teacher Left Behind: NCLB Certification Requirements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX, Nov 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-03-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p175052_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Presentation
Abstract: This session will review the requirements for foreign language teachers and their “qualification”, including deadlines, common certification pathways, alternative certification, the role of the principal, and other associated certification requirements. It will also focus on the importance of professional development activities to satisfy these ‘highly qualified’ requirements.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 10899 words || 
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4. Ellis, Elisabeth. "Provisional Liberalism, Part I: Why Deliberative Democratic Theory Requires a Provisionally Liberal Concept of Time" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-03-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65010_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper introduces a much larger project on the history, theory, and application of the idea of provisional liberalism. Here I argue that more than a decade of work in deliberative and discursive democratic theory has produced a solid record of improvement over previous models of democratic theory, but that these gains have been accompanied by very serious shortcomings. I propose to save the advantages and jettison the disadvantages of deliberative theory by revising it in accordance with the theory of provisional liberalism, and in particular, provisional liberalism?s concept of time.
This move is no mere abstraction, but entails a very specific set of methodological recommendations for democratic theorist, who, I argue, ought not to require deliberation to produce either quick consensus or individual political enlightenment. Rather, realizing the standards set by deliberative theory should promote dynamic shifts in the arguments that are possible to make successfully in public. Instead of looking to sophisticated versions of public opinion research for information on individual-level preferences and how they change, deliberative democratic theory should attend to the various literatures on the dynamics of political argument itself. These include work in the history of concepts, discourse theory, the languages of political thought, and empirical literatures on the causal power of ideas.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Pages: 1 pages || Words: 119 words || 
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5. Klingfuss, Jeffrey. "“State Sex Offender Public Notification Requirements: Easy to Extreme”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-03-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125768_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Every State has a myriad of varying public notification requirements that sex offenders must fulfill. Some requirements are passive requiring little input from the offender, others require active participation by the offender in notification. State law provisions further vary from specific notification of individuals, to geographic neighborhoods or just general public availability of the registration. Assigning each statutory provision a rating -- whether the requirement is passive or active and specific or general – a dual axis qualitative rating for that State can be achieved. Such a rating would be useful to test sex offender registration compliance rates; population clustering; preferential registering and other social legal issues.

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