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2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 758 words || 
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1. Thomas, Matthew. "‘Tracking changes’ in research capacity in the global South: International research collaborations and the ‘advancement’ of educational research in Tanzania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635629_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much of the published educational research in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has been produced by researchers from the global North or through collaborations with researchers from SSA where control of the research design and knowledge production is maintained by organizations from the global North. Without the contributions of scholars from SSA, there exists the possibility that knowledge will continue to be conceptualized and interpreted through Western lenses, further perpetuating the cultural and contextual bias of research across various fields. The implications of this condition include increasing power imbalances between countries of the core and those of the periphery. Furthermore, the value of research conducted by scholars from SSA also extends to the production of policy-relevant educational research with the capability to inform educational practice.

In order to address this perceived need for research in Africa by Africans, a new discourse has emerged within the field of international development that envisions egalitarian research collaborations between higher education institutions and researchers in the global North and those in the global South. Both neoliberal scholars and their critics envisage university faculty from the global South as the engines of a transformation in knowledge production if only collaborative institutional structures can be created across countries and continents. The international discourse situates faculty members as the locus of knowledge production despite the challenges they face in conducting research and publishing in international academic journals. This study does not assume that international research collaborations are able to redress power imbalances or fully empower faculty in SSA to accrue the research currency necessary to be competitive in the international academic arena; rather, the study seeks to interrogate the assumed relationship between international research partnerships and ‘capacity building’. It uses an international research collaboration between the University of Minnesota and a university college of education in Tanzania as a case study to investigate these issues.

This study draws on a critical interpretivist research paradigm that assumes both that meaning is subjective and co-constructed by actors, and that the meanings that become authoritative in any context are due to relations of power marked by histories of race, gender, and ethnicity, and by economic resources that are unevenly distributed across interlocutors. The study also uses a critical lens to examine relations of power between institutions engaged in research collaborations and the very notion of building capacity for African researchers and institutions. This work is informed by Arjun Appadurai’s scholarship regarding ‘research imagination’ and the distinctions he makes between ‘weak internationalization’ of research—inviting scholars of the global South to meet in the extant research norms and conventions—and ‘strong internationalization’, which challenges all researchers to consider how multiple ways of knowing and representing information could be valued.

This study is based on five years of collaboration with the university college of education as well as two intensive collaborative research projects co-conducted with faculty members in Tanzania. In order to explore faculty members’ experiences and understandings of ‘capacity building’, multiple research methods were utilized, including in-depth semi-structured interviews with faculty who have participated in a collaborative research project, a survey of all faculty members at the research site, participant observation through my involvement in collaborative research projects, and a review of primary documents relevant to the higher education context in Tanzania.

The findings suggest that collaborative research endeavors do indeed provide additional capacity for faculty to conduct and publish their own research. However, several inhibiting factors perpetuate an inequitable relationship between scholars in the core and those in the periphery, or in the case of collaborative research projects, scholars from the donor institution and those from the recipient institution. Primary among the findings is imbalance in collaboratively defining the research theme, questions, and methods. Other findings concern salient topics such as cross-cultural communication, information technology use, and the varied motivations of researchers themselves.

Higher education research shows that universities around the world are experiencing funding crises and new pressures to increase faculty teaching loads, expand access to more diverse student populations, and simultaneously improve faculty research capacity and productivity. Yet, the effects of these pressures on the development of research appear to be much greater for faculty working in most universities in SSA. This study contributes to this broader set of concerns by highlighting the various institutional forces placed on African faculty and how they perceive their roles in the broader politics and discourse of international knowledge production. It is also significant for scholars who seek to understand relations of power in ostensibly collaborative endeavors that shape the transnational production—and dissemination—of knowledge.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 152 words || 
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2. Hannes, Karin. "Including Findings from Arts Based Research in Systematic Reviews of Qualitative Research Evidence: Setting the Agenda for a Collaborative Research Exercise." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724381_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A systematic review of qualitative research evidence is a process of combining evidence from original qualitative studies to create new understanding. Review authors may have ignored insights generated from arts based research (ABR), a qualitative research method in which the expressive qualities of form are used to convey meaning. These authors exclusively draw from written research evidence. I argue that the exclusion of ABR findings is inappropriate when the aim of an author is to develop a comprehensive review. However, I also acknowledge the resistance of review authors to engage with non-textual research findings; we don’t really know how to deal with them. In this presentation I will outline the major challenges of integrating findings from ABR in systematic reviews, in an attempt to form alliances and generate the ‘critical mass’ that can assist us, authors of systematic reviews, to overcome our resistance to including non-textual data in our reviews.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 101 words || 
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3. Van Hove, Geert. "“Research or revenge?”, A Personal Account of a Research Process in the Border Zone Between the Story of my Grandmother and ‘Emancipatory Research’." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721227_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper I will try to illustrate the many pitfalls I encountered while working with Chris to tell her story (Van Hove et al.2012).
Chris’ her life story meets the life story of my dear grandmother: getting a “mental health problems” label – living in a psychiatric institution – forced to live without her children - …
Through the use of ‘critical incidents’ I will discuss the chaos I learned to know building the story of Chris while having my grandmother’s life in my backpack. I will confront the formal characteristics of ‘emancipatory research’ with my personal trajectory: research or revenge?

2016 - CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships Words: 135 words || 
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4. West, Kate. "What does it mean to be a trustworthy researcher in a community-academic research partnership?: Repairing distrust of research institutions through advocacy and action." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships, Crowne Plaza French Quarter, New Orleans, LA, May 11, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1099198_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable discussion
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A legacy of academic institutions causing harm to underrepresented communities has led to distrust of these institutions. Ethical community-academic partnerships can be a remedy and means to work toward health equity. Still, institutional structures often conflict with community needs, hindering participation. I draw from Potter’s feminist virtue ethics framework for trustworthiness in non-research settings (2002) to engage members of partnerships in considering what it means to be a trustworthy researcher and institution. I argue that the role of white researchers is at least two-fold: to support the development of minority individuals becoming health leaders, and to dismantle systems of oppression within our institutions and their effects on our partnerships. I offer research-based examples of Potter’s ten key features of trustworthiness for consideration of specific steps we can take toward the goal of inclusive, trustworthy institutions.

2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 44 words || 
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5. Siekmann, Sabine., Parker-Webster, Joan., Samson, Sally., Moses, Catherine., John-Shields, Agatha. and Wallace, Sheila. "Co-Constructing Intersubjective Researcher Identities: Exploring the Process of Participatory Action Research in a Research Collaborative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961698_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presentation provides an overview of the role of Alaska Native PhD students as researchers within school based language/culture maintenance and revitalization efforts. The discussion focuses on the interplay between the parallel research processes of Participatory Action Research as practiced in a Research Collaborative.

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