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Showing 1 through 5 of 11,549 records.
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2016 - CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships Words: 135 words || 
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1. West, Kate. "What does it mean to be a trustworthy researcher in a community-academic research partnership?: Repairing distrust of research institutions through advocacy and action." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships, Crowne Plaza French Quarter, New Orleans, LA, May 11, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1099198_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable discussion
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A legacy of academic institutions causing harm to underrepresented communities has led to distrust of these institutions. Ethical community-academic partnerships can be a remedy and means to work toward health equity. Still, institutional structures often conflict with community needs, hindering participation. I draw from Potter’s feminist virtue ethics framework for trustworthiness in non-research settings (2002) to engage members of partnerships in considering what it means to be a trustworthy researcher and institution. I argue that the role of white researchers is at least two-fold: to support the development of minority individuals becoming health leaders, and to dismantle systems of oppression within our institutions and their effects on our partnerships. I offer research-based examples of Potter’s ten key features of trustworthiness for consideration of specific steps we can take toward the goal of inclusive, trustworthy institutions.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 118 words || 
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2. Knudson, Sarah. "The Self, the Spirit, and the Unknown: Community Engaged Research and Participatory Action Research as Strategies for Aligning Qualitative Research Teaching with Indigenous Methods and Epistemology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719105_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many Canadian universities now make concerted efforts to promote curriculum development and classroom and campus cultures that recognize diversity in student viewpoints and life experiences. Increasingly, these efforts have involved promoting recognition and inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in the university setting. If adopted in the classroom, the promotion of Indigenous perspectives suggests exciting possibilities for teaching qualitative research critically. The literature, however, offers little guidance on achieving this through undergraduate qualitative methods teaching. Using examples of teaching initiatives, I suggest that by integrating Indigenous methods, perspectives and epistemology, particularly through student opportunities for community engaged learning and exposure to participatory action research, teaching qualitative research can promote critical recognition of multiple ways of knowing.

2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 145 words || 
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3. Noffke, Susan. "Action Research as an example of the interconnections between research, advocacy and ethics: What’s a researcher to do?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504930_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Action Research is no stranger to debates over the role of advocacy in research. While the form of this type of research varies over time and area of inquiry, for over 80 years there has been a strong thread of advocacy for social justice in this research method. In fact, the history of social research in general has, from its very beginning, included this same debate.
In this paper, I argue that the issue of advocacy must be seen in terms of an overall sense of what research ethics must be in relation to social responsibility. Using concepts from feminist scholarship, I introduce the idea that issues of power are essential to the debate over integrity in research. From this, I argue that advocacy is not only essential, it is integral to all forms of research, and should form the foundation of debates over research ethics.

2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 130 words || 
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4. Besoain, Carolina., Cornejo, Marcela., Carmona, Mariela. and Faundez, Ximena. "Researching Researchers: Trajectories, conceptions and practices of qualitative social research in Chile" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, May 17, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p489492_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of researchers that implement qualitative social research in Chile. There were pursuit researchers’ trajectories, their practices and their conceptions about qualitative social research. The study had an explorative design and used qualitative methodology. Twelve reflective interviews were performed to researchers of diverse areas, themes, and generations. The data produced was analyzed through methods that articulated elements of content, narrative, and discursive analysis.
Results show that, through the different stages of researchers’ trajectories, these feel tensed by a need to take position with the scientific knowledge and with aims related to the development of qualitative research. They also show investigative practices and some of the researchers’ conceptions about social research, qualitative research and the place of subjectivity in the investigative process.

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