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2016 - CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships Words: 135 words || 
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1. West, Kate. "What does it mean to be a trustworthy researcher in a community-academic research partnership?: Repairing distrust of research institutions through advocacy and action." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships, Crowne Plaza French Quarter, New Orleans, LA, May 11, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1099198_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable discussion
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A legacy of academic institutions causing harm to underrepresented communities has led to distrust of these institutions. Ethical community-academic partnerships can be a remedy and means to work toward health equity. Still, institutional structures often conflict with community needs, hindering participation. I draw from Potter’s feminist virtue ethics framework for trustworthiness in non-research settings (2002) to engage members of partnerships in considering what it means to be a trustworthy researcher and institution. I argue that the role of white researchers is at least two-fold: to support the development of minority individuals becoming health leaders, and to dismantle systems of oppression within our institutions and their effects on our partnerships. I offer research-based examples of Potter’s ten key features of trustworthiness for consideration of specific steps we can take toward the goal of inclusive, trustworthy institutions.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 152 words || 
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2. Hannes, Karin. "Including Findings from Arts Based Research in Systematic Reviews of Qualitative Research Evidence: Setting the Agenda for a Collaborative Research Exercise." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724381_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A systematic review of qualitative research evidence is a process of combining evidence from original qualitative studies to create new understanding. Review authors may have ignored insights generated from arts based research (ABR), a qualitative research method in which the expressive qualities of form are used to convey meaning. These authors exclusively draw from written research evidence. I argue that the exclusion of ABR findings is inappropriate when the aim of an author is to develop a comprehensive review. However, I also acknowledge the resistance of review authors to engage with non-textual research findings; we don’t really know how to deal with them. In this presentation I will outline the major challenges of integrating findings from ABR in systematic reviews, in an attempt to form alliances and generate the ‘critical mass’ that can assist us, authors of systematic reviews, to overcome our resistance to including non-textual data in our reviews.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 101 words || 
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3. Van Hove, Geert. "“Research or revenge?”, A Personal Account of a Research Process in the Border Zone Between the Story of my Grandmother and ‘Emancipatory Research’." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721227_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper I will try to illustrate the many pitfalls I encountered while working with Chris to tell her story (Van Hove et al.2012).
Chris’ her life story meets the life story of my dear grandmother: getting a “mental health problems” label – living in a psychiatric institution – forced to live without her children - …
Through the use of ‘critical incidents’ I will discuss the chaos I learned to know building the story of Chris while having my grandmother’s life in my backpack. I will confront the formal characteristics of ‘emancipatory research’ with my personal trajectory: research or revenge?

2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 44 words || 
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4. Siekmann, Sabine., Parker-Webster, Joan., Samson, Sally., Moses, Catherine., John-Shields, Agatha. and Wallace, Sheila. "Co-Constructing Intersubjective Researcher Identities: Exploring the Process of Participatory Action Research in a Research Collaborative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961698_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presentation provides an overview of the role of Alaska Native PhD students as researchers within school based language/culture maintenance and revitalization efforts. The discussion focuses on the interplay between the parallel research processes of Participatory Action Research as practiced in a Research Collaborative.

2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 145 words || 
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5. Noffke, Susan. "Action Research as an example of the interconnections between research, advocacy and ethics: What’s a researcher to do?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504930_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Action Research is no stranger to debates over the role of advocacy in research. While the form of this type of research varies over time and area of inquiry, for over 80 years there has been a strong thread of advocacy for social justice in this research method. In fact, the history of social research in general has, from its very beginning, included this same debate.
In this paper, I argue that the issue of advocacy must be seen in terms of an overall sense of what research ethics must be in relation to social responsibility. Using concepts from feminist scholarship, I introduce the idea that issues of power are essential to the debate over integrity in research. From this, I argue that advocacy is not only essential, it is integral to all forms of research, and should form the foundation of debates over research ethics.

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