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2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 130 words || 
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1. Besoain, Carolina., Cornejo, Marcela., Carmona, Mariela. and Faundez, Ximena. "Researching Researchers: Trajectories, conceptions and practices of qualitative social research in Chile" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, May 17, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p489492_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of researchers that implement qualitative social research in Chile. There were pursuit researchers’ trajectories, their practices and their conceptions about qualitative social research. The study had an explorative design and used qualitative methodology. Twelve reflective interviews were performed to researchers of diverse areas, themes, and generations. The data produced was analyzed through methods that articulated elements of content, narrative, and discursive analysis.
Results show that, through the different stages of researchers’ trajectories, these feel tensed by a need to take position with the scientific knowledge and with aims related to the development of qualitative research. They also show investigative practices and some of the researchers’ conceptions about social research, qualitative research and the place of subjectivity in the investigative process.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 122 words || 
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2. Knox, Lyndee. "The Reflective Practitioner Process: Using participatory action research methods to engage health care providers in research, and to increase the relevance of research to practice." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p127094_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Studies suggest it can take up to 17 years for research to be translated into regular use by health care providers in community practice. One reason for this lag is the lack of involvement of providers in defining research questions, and later in designing strategies for implementing findings in practice. LANet, a practice-based research network (PBRN) in Los Angeles, uses a participatory action research process called the Reflective Practitioner (RP) to engage its provider members in the development and conduct of research, and to facilitate effective interactions between providers and full-time researchers participating in the studies. This paper will give an overview of the RP process and provide a case study of RP LA Net’s use of the process, and its outcomes.

2016 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 143 words || 
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3. Malen, Betty. "Enriching the Preparation of Education Researchers and Practitioner-Scholars: Linking School District Research Priorities and University-based Research Courses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center, Detroit, Michigan, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1160712_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of a novel effort to strengthen the preparation of both practitioner-scholars and education researchers. The author describes a university-district partnership that offers graduate students the opportunity to develop research understandings and skills through participation in a “real” research project and provides districts the formative evaluation information they need to guide decision-making on major reform initiatives. The paper suggests that partnerships which link school district research priorities with university-based research courses can enrich the university’s approach to the teaching of research methods and can yield rigorous studies that both serve local districts and speak to broader academic and professional audiences. Given recent discussions concerning the viability of research-practice partnerships in education (Coburn & Penuel, 2016), this paper serves as an important connection between educational leadership preparation and the broader debate about how research can be used to inform practice.

2010 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1548 words || 
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4. Wilbur, Sharon. and Gammill, Shellie. "Developing a Conceptual Framework for Student Voice: Bridging Research to Research and Research to Practice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Oct 28, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435348_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: The purpose of this study is to provide a democratic conceptual framework for student voice. Although multiple studies have examined many aspects of student voice, there is not an overarching framework to bridge these concepts. A metasynthesis of student voice literature resulted in a democratic conceptual framework that deepens understanding of current literature, aides in the development of future research, and guides leaders in implementing student voice initiatives.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 758 words || 
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5. Thomas, Matthew. "‘Tracking changes’ in research capacity in the global South: International research collaborations and the ‘advancement’ of educational research in Tanzania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635629_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much of the published educational research in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has been produced by researchers from the global North or through collaborations with researchers from SSA where control of the research design and knowledge production is maintained by organizations from the global North. Without the contributions of scholars from SSA, there exists the possibility that knowledge will continue to be conceptualized and interpreted through Western lenses, further perpetuating the cultural and contextual bias of research across various fields. The implications of this condition include increasing power imbalances between countries of the core and those of the periphery. Furthermore, the value of research conducted by scholars from SSA also extends to the production of policy-relevant educational research with the capability to inform educational practice.

In order to address this perceived need for research in Africa by Africans, a new discourse has emerged within the field of international development that envisions egalitarian research collaborations between higher education institutions and researchers in the global North and those in the global South. Both neoliberal scholars and their critics envisage university faculty from the global South as the engines of a transformation in knowledge production if only collaborative institutional structures can be created across countries and continents. The international discourse situates faculty members as the locus of knowledge production despite the challenges they face in conducting research and publishing in international academic journals. This study does not assume that international research collaborations are able to redress power imbalances or fully empower faculty in SSA to accrue the research currency necessary to be competitive in the international academic arena; rather, the study seeks to interrogate the assumed relationship between international research partnerships and ‘capacity building’. It uses an international research collaboration between the University of Minnesota and a university college of education in Tanzania as a case study to investigate these issues.

This study draws on a critical interpretivist research paradigm that assumes both that meaning is subjective and co-constructed by actors, and that the meanings that become authoritative in any context are due to relations of power marked by histories of race, gender, and ethnicity, and by economic resources that are unevenly distributed across interlocutors. The study also uses a critical lens to examine relations of power between institutions engaged in research collaborations and the very notion of building capacity for African researchers and institutions. This work is informed by Arjun Appadurai’s scholarship regarding ‘research imagination’ and the distinctions he makes between ‘weak internationalization’ of research—inviting scholars of the global South to meet in the extant research norms and conventions—and ‘strong internationalization’, which challenges all researchers to consider how multiple ways of knowing and representing information could be valued.

This study is based on five years of collaboration with the university college of education as well as two intensive collaborative research projects co-conducted with faculty members in Tanzania. In order to explore faculty members’ experiences and understandings of ‘capacity building’, multiple research methods were utilized, including in-depth semi-structured interviews with faculty who have participated in a collaborative research project, a survey of all faculty members at the research site, participant observation through my involvement in collaborative research projects, and a review of primary documents relevant to the higher education context in Tanzania.

The findings suggest that collaborative research endeavors do indeed provide additional capacity for faculty to conduct and publish their own research. However, several inhibiting factors perpetuate an inequitable relationship between scholars in the core and those in the periphery, or in the case of collaborative research projects, scholars from the donor institution and those from the recipient institution. Primary among the findings is imbalance in collaboratively defining the research theme, questions, and methods. Other findings concern salient topics such as cross-cultural communication, information technology use, and the varied motivations of researchers themselves.

Higher education research shows that universities around the world are experiencing funding crises and new pressures to increase faculty teaching loads, expand access to more diverse student populations, and simultaneously improve faculty research capacity and productivity. Yet, the effects of these pressures on the development of research appear to be much greater for faculty working in most universities in SSA. This study contributes to this broader set of concerns by highlighting the various institutional forces placed on African faculty and how they perceive their roles in the broader politics and discourse of international knowledge production. It is also significant for scholars who seek to understand relations of power in ostensibly collaborative endeavors that shape the transnational production—and dissemination—of knowledge.

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