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2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 222 words || 
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1. Haggerty, Catherine. and O'Muircheartaigh, Colm. "Interviews of Leaseholders in Chicago's Housing Authority: A Comparison of Data Collected by Public Housing Residents and Non-Public Housing Residents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Several years ago the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) announced a “Plan for Transformation” which included the relocation of all public housing residents over a ten-year period. The MacArthur Foundation is funding research to help the CHA improve the relocation process; NORC is collecting data from public housing residents to inform relocation improvements.

During the planning phase of the project various groups interested in the improvement process talked about both the benefits and drawbacks of using public housing residents to collect these data. Those in-favor of using public housing residents to collect the data argued that public housing residents are more comfortable talking to other public housing residents and more likely to honestly disclose their experiences. Those not-in-favor of using public housing residents as interviewers argued that public housing residents are angry with the CHA and may influence respondents’ answers.

NORC recruited and hired half of the interviewing staff for this project from within the CHA developments. NORC randomly assigned half of the addresses in each building to CHA resident interviewers and the other half to non-CHA resident interviewers. The paper will describe the interviewer recruiting and hiring process, the interviewer training, and the operational strategies employed during data collection. The paper will also examine and compare the data collected by CHA resident interviewers and non-CHA resident interviewers.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8361 words || 
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2. Reyes, Adriana. and Taylor, Marylee. "The Impact of Local Black Residents’ Socioeconomic Status on White Residents’ Racial Views" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper extends the study of contextual influences on racial attitudes by asking how the SES of the local black community shapes the racial attitudes of local whites. Using responses to the 1998-2002 General Social Surveys merged with year 2000 census data, we compare the influences of black educational and economic composition on white residents’ attitudes, and we assess the independence of these effects from the impact of white contextual SES. Across three dimensions of racial attitudes, white residents’ views are more positive in localities where the black population contains more college graduates. However, such localities tend also to have highly educated white populations, as well as higher incomes among blacks and whites, and the multiple influences are inseparable. In contrast, many racial attitude measures show an independent effect of black economic composition, white residents reporting more negative views where the local African American community is poorer.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8884 words || 
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3. Hochschild, Thomas. "Why Cul-de-sac Bulb Residents Experience Higher Levels of Social Cohesion than Residents of Other Street Forms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507099_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars interested in the “community question” have focused their attention primarily on communal ties in macro-level geographical regions (e.g., urban, suburban, and rural contexts). Often overlooked, however, are micro-level factors and contexts that are essential components of the local community. Through close-ended surveys and open-ended interview questions, this research ascertains factors associated with residential social cohesion—the primary building block of the local community. The data reveal that residents of cul-de-sac bulbs experience the highest levels of attitudinal and behavioral social cohesion, followed by residents of dead-end cul-de-sacs, then residents of linear through streets. To explain this “cul-de-sac effect,” I expand on the work of Suttles (1972) and Ericksen (1980), and theorize that residents use aspects of the physical environment to symbolically create domains of guardianship—areas that demarcate who we are willing and able to 1) defend, 2) assist, and 3) care for. Residents of cul-de-sac bulbs are more likely to develop domains of guardianship because they share the geographical distinction of living on a circular formation together. This study offers new insight into the ways people interact within, and with, physical space.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 202 words || 
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4. Socia, Kelly. "Residence Restriction Legislation, Sex Crime Rates, and the Spatial Distribution of Sex Offender Residences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p665938_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Residence restriction policies prohibit registered sex offenders (RSOs) from living within a given distance of certain places where children might gather. As of 2010, research on these policies had been limited, and largely focused on the unintended consequences these policies cause for RSOs, typically as a result of reduced housing options. This study addressed four issues: 1) the characteristics of counties passing these policies, 2) the efficacy of county residence restrictions to reduce sex crime rates in New York State, 3) whether these policies are associated with the spatial distribution of RSO residences in upstate New York neighborhoods, and 4) whether this spatial distribution is in turn associated with differences in county-level recidivistic sex crime rates. Results indicate that political competition is influential in passing a county residence restriction and that nearby residences restriction may dissuade others from passing their own policies. While these restrictions do not reduce recidivistic sex crimes, they may generally deter some individuals who are not yet RSOs from sexually victimizing adults. Finally, results indicate that while a residence restriction is in some cases associated with the within and between-neighborhood spatial distribution of RSOs, there is little to no indirect effect on recidivistic sex crime rates.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6053 words || 
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5. Tyson, Will. "Residence Hall Segregation and Roommate Assignment as Determinants of Interracial Friendship among First-Year College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110265_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The college campus gives students the freedom to explore friendships in a diverse age-homogeneous society of scholars, but this freedom occurs within the constraints of the university as an institution. The institution can influence interracial friendship formation using residence hall segregation and roommate assignments to maximize interracial exposure in residence halls. Proximity of interracial potential ties around campus, in residence halls, and in the dorm room influence the inter-group propinquity in the freshman student population. The residential university provides the opportunity for repeated contact in local communities and campus social areas, a necessary antecedent to friendship. This study examines the extent to which residence hall segregation affects friendship segregation on a first-year student campus. Using data from a panel study of campus life at an elite university, this study finds that interracial exposure is a key factor in interracial friendship for minority students, but white students form friendship without regard for residential segregation. Both white and minority students find interracial roommate assignments a strong source for out-group friendship. Measures of weak ties find that minority students explore other residence halls to seek out same-race potential ties.

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