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Showing 1 through 5 of 916 records.
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2019 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 170 words || 
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1. Barnhill-Dilling, S.., Costantini, Danielle. and Delborne, Jason. "Innovations, Interruptions, and Regenerations of Chestnut Restoration: Reciprocal Restoration as a Framework for Reflexivity in Chestnut Restoration Narratives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Hotel Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, Sep 03, 2019 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1530694_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The restoration of the American chestnut tree has been framed as an urgent conservation need that can be remedied (perhaps exclusively) through the innovation and subsequent deployment of a genetically engineered chestnut tree. Bucolic narratives rooted in European American -- and Native American -- heritage have underpinned these urgent calls for chestnut restoration or, for some, chestnut resurrection. This paper explores how Reciprocal Restoration (Kimmerer 2011) -- which explores restoration through the lenses of Indigenous communities -- can prompt reflexivity in the narratives surrounding chestnut restoration. Drawing on interviews and participant observation data of community and stakeholder engagement activity surrounding the GE chestnut, this paper demonstrates how restoration narratives are complicated by Indigenous histories and perspectives. Connecting STS and ecological restoration literatures, Reciprocal Restoration creates space for reflexivity around chestnut restoration narratives, allowing for the identification and interruption of existing stories about restoration. Importantly, Reciprocal Restoration also offers a framework for the regeneration of narratives around the restoration of the American chestnut tree that might inform greater reflexivity in innovation.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 64 words || 
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2. Sherman, Lawrence., Strang, Heather. and Slothower, Molly. "Race and Restorative Policing: A 13 to 18-year Followup of Criminal Histories by Race of Random Assignment to Court vs. Restorative Policing." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1031802_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Policing tactics that experiments find to be effective for some racial groups can have very different impacts on people of other races. This study explores the relationship between race and restorative policing through the long-term reoffending of offenders randomly assigned to restorative policing or to court in 4 random assignment experiments in Canberra, Australia. Implications for policing in the context of race are discussed.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 198 words || 
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3. Lara, Christian. and Dierkhising, Carly. "Juvenile Restorative Justice: Analyzing the Experiences of Juvenile Participants in a Restorative Justice Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1290911_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Restorative justice is an alternative criminal justice approach that focuses on the rehabilitation and reintegration of juveniles through resolutions with victims and the community at large. The main purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of both victim and offender during a restorative justice conference and to examine if there is a congruent feeling of satisfaction shared between the victim and offender. This study also aims to determine if a high level of congruence shared between participants is associated with lower levels of recidivism. The sample (N = 54) consists of first time juvenile offenders, from Pennsylvania with the average age of 13.61 (SD= 1.917); 51.9% male. The results show that although there is a congruence of satisfaction between victim and offender following these conferences, this congruence is not related to recidivism. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the older the participants are during these conferences, the less likely it is for them to share a high level of congruence. Further research should continue to probe the potential mediating and moderating variables that influence restorative justice programs in order to determine what parts of the conference effect recidivism rates and for whom the programs are more valuable.

2014 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 231 words || 
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4. Parsons, Samantha., Fox, Dylan., Cannon, Laurie., Ramirez, Cody., O'Donnell, Lisa. and Hauser, Charles. "Analysis of Soil Restoration Treatments on Fungal, Eubacterial and Archaea Microbiomes: Implications for Black Capped Vireo Habitat Restoration Efforts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas A&M Galveston Campus, Galveston, TX, Mar 07, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p729467_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Plants associate with root microbiota distinct from microbial communities present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing the rhizosphere (immediately surrounding the root) contribute to plant growth, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the fungal, eubacterial and archaea rRNA genes of soil microbiomes from two positive control sites and three habitat restoration sites within the Vireo Research Area and Wild Basin Wilderness Preserve to test the hypothesis that soil remediation treatments can establish microbial communities characteristic of black capped vireo habitat. The three habitat restoration sites consist of 5 mulch sock treatments: 1) control treatment (mulch socks only); 2) onsite mulch (juniper and hardwoods); 3) onsite composted mulch (juniper and hardwoods); 4) Mulch and biochar combined; 5) composted mulch and biochar combined. Using primers designed to amplify each kingdom we have identified the following taxa from the treatment sites: 1387 fungi, 2697 eubacteria, and 96 archeae using QIIME and the Greengenes and Silva databases. Data from the control sites are currently being sequenced. Preliminary principal coordinate analyses for all three kingdoms suggest that microbial populations vary in response to both season (sampling date) and remediation treatment. We will present treatment-specific characterizations of both alpha and beta diversity for all three kingdoms. The results of this research will hopefully provide insights into a wider scope of ecological restoration strategies using soil restoration treatments.

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