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2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 142 words || 
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1. Clark, Kendra. and Pyrooz, David. "Restricting More Than Housing: The Effects of Restrictive Housing on Recidivism Among Juveniles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149420_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The placement of inmates into restrictive housing--or, more well known as solitary confinement--is a common practice in American jails, prisons, and juvenile facilities. A recent estimate indicates that anywhere from 80,000 to 100,000 inmates in U.S. prisons were in restrictive housing. The evidence of the consequences of restrictive housing is inconclusive, according to Frost and Monteiro (2016), the authors of a recent National Institute of Justice white paper. Even less clear are the consequences of restrictive housing among juveniles. Drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this study examines the effects of restrictive housing on recidivism among juvenile offenders using longitudinal data and a matched samples analytic strategy. Results of the current study will be contrasted against the current state of the literature and will speak to recent policy initiatives surrounding the placement of offenders generally, and juveniles particularly, in restrictive housing.

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 217 words || 
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2. Soboleva, Anita. "The Rhetoric of Restrictions: Analysis of Arguments Used to Justify Legitimate Restrictions on Basic Freedoms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p407349_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presentation will contain the analysis of texts of judicial decisions in Russian cases, where the restrictions, imposed by the administrative bodies or legislative acts on freedom of assembly, freedom of expression or freedom of association were challenged by the applicants as incompatible with the Russian Constitution or international human rights standards. As far as the “exercise of these freedoms carries with it duties and responsibilities” and “may be subject to such formalities, conditions, restrictions or penalties as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society” (art. 10.2 of the ECHR), in each case the courts need to decide, whether the restrictions, imposed on the applicants, had legitimate aim and were justified, or they rather must be considered as illegal obstacles for the realization of the basic rights. The arguments used by domestic courts and the European Court of human rights will be analyzed in rhetorical terms. The nature of arguments (dialectic v. euristic & sophistic), types of arguments, employed by the judges to justify their decisions, and commonplaces (understood as values) to which the judges referred explicitly or implicitly, will be analyzed in order to understand, to which extent judicial decision making is influenced by moral and/or political considerations (if any) rather then by a standard of “necessity in a democratic society”.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 17294 words || 
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3. Nackenoff, Carol. "Constructing an Agenda of Restriction: Activists, Institutions and the Issue of Immigration Restriction in the Progressive Era and 1920s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40165_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Court played an important role in nationalizing the battle over immigration restriction, in defining whiteness, and considering who could be a citizen. While the "state of courts and parties" was yielding to the rise of the administrative state, the Court was paying attention to "social facts" and popular discourse about race and citizenship. The agendas of organized labor, suffrage activists, Progressive reformers, and nativists intersected in a virtue or merit-based discourse that supported efforts to add literacy qualifications for new U.S. entrants and later more severe restrictive meausres. Strategies and decisions made by each of these groups had an impact on federalism and on the institutional arenas in which battles would be fought.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8590 words || 
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4. Paek, Hye-Jin., McLeod, Douglas. and Lambe, Jennifer. "Antecedents to Support for Media Restrictions: Individual Differences, Democratic Principles and Third-Person Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14123_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The study investigates the roles of multiple factors (e.g., individual demographics and values, message desirability, and media use), as well as perceived media effects on self and others, in predicting support for censorship of three types of media content. Analyzing survey data collected form student and adult groups, this study finds that the both groups tend to support more extreme forms of media restrictions for propaganda than for information and entertainment content. Further, our regression analyses indicate that message desirability and First Amendment support significantly predict censorship support, while self-other perception gap does not. Although general patterns for censorship support appear to be similar in both groups, close examination reveals that students and adults are different in terms of factors they consider for censorship support. Complex processes related to the development of opinions regarding policy options and future directions on the third-person effect research are discussed.

2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9459 words || 
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5. Owens, John. and Wrighton, J.. "Procedural Control and Majority Party Entrenchement in the U.S. House: An Explanation of Rules Restrictiveness Over Time" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p196771_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Throughout American history, partisan majorities have set the agenda and structured legislative decisions on the floor in the United States House of Representatives, and the partisan minority has often been greatly disadvantaged by the rules governing debate. When minorities become majorities, one might expect them to relax the rules, and for a time, that may be the case. From Congress to Congress, however, the size, ideological composition, and cohesion of the majority party change. Majority leaders respond to those changes in part by varying the nature of the rules of debate in order to promote and protect their legislative agenda. Thus, as majorities become entrenched and cohesive over time, one may observe that the rules become more restrictive. In this paper, we explore the variation in the restrictiveness of rules in the House from the 79th to the 105th Congresses and find that – after a new majority gains control of the chamber – the restrictiveness of the rules increases and grows substantially. Further, the majority’s distance from the House’s ideological median and its effective size considerably enhance rules restrictiveness.

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