Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 68 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 - Next  Jump:
2016 - SRCD Special Topic Meeting: Technology and Media in Children's Development Words: 393 words || 
Info
1. Choi, Koeun., Kirkorian, Heather. and Pempek, Tiffany. "On-screen or off-screen? The role of retrieval contexts and working memory in toddlers’ object retrieval using touch screens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Special Topic Meeting: Technology and Media in Children's Development, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1154571_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Abstract: Toddlers exhibit difficulty transferring information from video to real-world events (Anderson & Kirkorian, 2016; Troseth, 2010) due to the mismatch between encoding and retrieval contexts (Barr, 2013). Infants transfer more easily within one context (video to video) than across contexts (video to real-world) when learning is assessed in a single trial (Zack et al., 2009). However, it remains unknown whether contextual similarity would help or hinder learning when toddlers need to update mental representations across multiple trials (i.e., when they must inhibit memory of previous trials to succeed on the current trial).
We examined the role of retrieval contexts across multiple trials in an object-retrieval task. Toddlers (27-35 mos, N=42) were asked to either (a) watch hiding events on a tablet and find the hidden objects on a felt board (between-context; n=22) or (b) watch the same hiding events on the tablet but find the objects on another tablet (within-context; n=20). We also assessed receptive vocabulary and visual-spatial working memory (WM; Spin-the-Pots). Based on prior research, we hypothesized that the within-context group would perform better than the between-context group on the initial trial. If contextual similarity supports learning despite the interference from prior search events, the facilitative effect of within-context condition would persist across trials, and WM would predict learning only in the more cognitively demanding between-context condition. Alternatively, if contextual similarity increases the competition between representations, the facilitative effect would decrease over time, and WM would predict learning regardless of condition.
Consistent with prior research, the within-context group outperformed the between-subject condition during earlier trials (β01 = 1.73, SE= 0.70, p<.05). However, the effect was reversed in later trials (β02 = -1.14, SE= 0.35, p<.001; Figure 2). This drop in the within-context condition was primarily due to increased perseverative errors. That is, toddlers in the within-context condition often searched the location from the previous rather than the current trial. Additionally, even after controlling for age and vocabulary, WM was a significant predictor of search performance regardless of condition (β02 = 0.99, SE= 0.43, p <.05).
These results suggest that transferring information from screens is cognitively demanding for toddlers, as indicated by better performance as working-memory skills increase. Also, reducing contextual differences may facilitate transfer initially but disrupt transfer later on by making it more difficult for children to distinguish between different mental representations. Future research should consider the contexts of transfer to support learning from media.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 209 words || 
Info
2. Weber, Heloise. "Politics of Power and Knowledge in Global Development: Retrieving the Absent through an Engagement with the Present" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251416_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The roles of ‘knowledge and power’ and ‘knowledge as power’ in development have been increasingly gaining the attention of critical scholars as well as policy practitioners. While the former seek to articulate the way in which (global) development is constituted through power struggles which also entail struggles over knowledge in development, the latter tend to misapprehend both. That is, the discourses of development they construct render invisible that development has been historically a continuously contested practice. This is evident for example, in the continued deployment of the comparative method in the theory and practice of mainstream development analysis. Methodologically, such approaches reify spatial boundaries and operate with a temporal logic that necessarily subordinates alternative conceptions of development to that of ‘past time’ in terms of a temporalisation as ‘past, prior or primordial’. A consequence of this is the foreclosure of the possibility of articulating social struggles in challenge of the politics underpinnings this spatio-temporal fix. This paper argues that a critical engagement of this dynamic with reference to the dialectic between ‘knowledge and power’ and ‘knowledge as power’ in struggles over development can render visible the analytical and practical tensions that ensue under a continued legacy of colonial /postcolonial thinking within a reconfigured ‘international’ political economy of global development.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 10494 words || 
Info
3. Su, Chunke. "A Multitheoretical Network Perspective on Organizational Member's Information Retrieval From Human and Digital Knowledge Repositories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232629_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The goal of this study was to theorize and empirically test network models of organizational member?s information retrieval from their colleagues and digital knowledge repositories (e.g. intranets and databases). Based on the Multi-theoretical Multilevel (MTML) framework (Contractor, Wasserman & Faust, 2006; Monge & Contractor, 2003), this study applied and extended 3 social science theories (transactive memory, public goods, and social contagion) to examine team members? information retrieval networks. Empirical data were collected from 9 organizational work teams in Western Europe. A cutting-edge social network analysis technique, Exponential Random Graph Modeling/p* analysis, was conducted to test the hypotheses. The results found that team members had the greatest tendency to retrieve information from those colleagues whom they perceived to be knowledgeable and accessible. In addition, team members? information retrieval from digital knowledge repositories was greatly influenced by social contagion effects. As one of the original research using a multi-theoretical perspective to examine multidimensional information retrieval networks, this study has important implications for theoretical development, methodological applications, and managerial practices.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6098 words || 
Info
4. Lauricella, Alexis., Pempek, Tiffany., Barr, Rachel. and Calvert, Sandra. "Contingent Computer Interactions for Young Children’s Object Retrieval Success" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404323_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Seventy-two children, ages 30 and 36 months, participated in a hide-and-seek object-retrieval game in one of three conditions: 1) playing an interactive computer game; 2) observing a video; or 3) watching an adult find the hidden characters through a one-way mirror. After exposure, children searched for the three characters in a playroom designed to look just like the room in the game. Children who played the interactive computer game and watched the live demonstration performed significantly better on the search task than children who observed the video. The results suggest that children’s learning from a screen can be improved by contingent, interactive experiences with media. These findings can help producers create online games that facilitate children’s skills at linking what they do on a screen to real-life experiences.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 107 words || 
Info
5. Leippe, Michael. and Eisenstadt, Donna. "An eyewitness ease-of-retrieval effect: Memory report difficulty influences identification confidence and reports of memory conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482594_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: College students witnessed a videotaped theft, provided a cued-recall report of the theft in response to difficult or easy questions, attempted a photo-lineup identification, and, answered confidence-related questions. Regardless of whether the thief was present or absent in the lineup, choosers reported less identification confidence and more challenging viewing and identification experiences when the memory test was difficult compared to easy. This supports the cue-belief model that asserts that eyewitnesses’ beliefs about face recognition are informed by intrinsic meta-memory cues. As in other domains, subjective retrieval difficulty apparently served as a cue about a self-belief, in this case quality of memory about the criminal.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy