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2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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1. Reynolds, Jeremy. and Aletraris, Lydia. "For Love or Money?: Extrinsic Rewards, Intrinsic Rewards, Work-Life Issues, and Hour Mismatches." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241030_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7149 words || 
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2. McKernan, Brian., Martey, Rosa., Stromer-Galley, Jennifer., Kenski, Kate., Clegg, Ben., Folkestad, James., Rhodes, Matthew., Shaw, Adrienne., Saulnier, Tobi. and Strzalkowski, Tomek. "We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Badges: The Impact of Reward Features and Feeling Rewarded In Educational Games" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing from recent research on the ability of video games to satisfy psychological needs, this paper identifies how the presence of rewards influences learning complex concepts and tasks using an educational video game. We designed and developed two 60-minute educational games with and without a range of reward features and examined learning outcomes among 242 participants in university laboratories. Although both games improved learning, analyses suggest that the quantity of in-game rewards did not have an impact on biased behavior avoidance or knowledge about biases. To further illuminate these findings, we examined perceptions of feeling rewarded and found that those who felt more rewarded had more favorable views of the gameplay experience, but they did not demonstrate different learning outcomes.

2005 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 7333 words || 
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3. Martorano, Nancy. "Misplaced Rewards or Unfair Punishments: Do State Government Officials Benefit or Suffer from the Public's Perception of Federal Officials?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Inter-Continental Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Jan 06, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p67361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Trust in the national government has declined greatly over the last fifty years, and over the past decade citizens have taken direct action to limit the actions of their politicians at both the national and state levels. Might negative feelings about national-level political actors be driving some of the punitive actions taken against state politicians? Research has long shown that governors benefit from a popular President of their party, and recent preliminary research suggests that state legislators may be rewarded when feelings about the U.S. Congress improve.

This paper extends earlier research investigating whether the public’s punitive actions against state legislatures are the result of actual state-level conditions or whether the public’s negative feelings about Congress are driving these actions. Here we investigate another possible connection between attitudes about national and state actors.

Using an augmented set of available public opinion, policy, and institutional measures, we test to see whether gubernatorial approval is affected by feelings about a state’s U.S. Senators. Controlling for many factors known to impact gubernatorial ratings, we find that the public’s feelings about their U.S. Senators (junior Senators specifically) are linked to state governor approval. In addition, this study also uncovered some interesting findings concerning state level forces. One of the more interesting findings concerned lame duck governor status. This status alone leads to a substantial decrease in gubernatorial approval. However, when combined with incumbency this effect reverses.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6499 words || 
Info
4. Rosenthal, Jeffrey. "Intrinsic Job Rewards in the United States: 1977-2002" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p240706_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Distinct demographic changes in the labor force such as increased female labor force participation and educational attainment and structural changes such as movement towards managerial, professional and service occupations, greater complexity requirements for work, along with institutional shifts in organizational practices have had an impact on the job rewards of American workers. Intrinsic job rewards are under-studied job rewards that have changed as a result of these macro-level changes at work. Intrinsic job rewards remain an important concern for American workers because they may offset economic rewards, and serve as important covariates with outcomes such as job satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test how structural and demographic changes in the workplace over the 1980s and 1990s have provided workers with more intrinsic job rewards at work. These trends are examined by using the Quality of Employment Survey of 1977, and the National Study of the Changing Workforce of 1997 and 2002, all nationally representative studies of the American labor force. The results indicate that workers improved their intrinsic job rewards from 1977 to 2002 due to the rising complexity of work, movement towards professional occupations, and possibly through more post-Fordist organizational working conditions.

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