Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,621 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 525 - Next  Jump:
2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8336 words || 
Info
1. Hanan, Josh. "Continuity and Change in the Discourses of Contemporary Rhetorical Theory: Exploring the Historical Shifts from Rhetoric as Epistemic, Project for the Rhetoric of Inquiry, and Critical Rhetoric" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p319040_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the historical and theoretical shifts that have taken place in rhetorical theory over the past 40 years. By highlighting how three primary developments in rhetoric’s contemporary history have ultimately allow for the emergence of a new “neo-productive” model of rhetorical effectivity, the essay refutes Cherwitz and Darwin’s claim that contemporary rhetorical theory is still mired in debates over rhetoric’s epistemic function.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 188 words || 
Info
2. Lehn, Melody. "Teaching Rhetorical Pedagogy: Pedagogy as Rhetorical Practice in the Contemporary Rhetoric Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368410_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As Virginia Anderson has rightly identified, pedagogy can function as rhetorical practice. In this vein, I argue that the constitution of pedagogy as rhetorical practice is found in the two-fold purpose of a course in rhetorical pedagogy – the passing on of the historical tradition of teaching rhetoric and open deliberation considering and provoking the more practical issues facing the contemporary teacher of rhetoric. From this perspective, the teacher of a course in rhetorical pedagogy functions as a rhetorical practitioner and, in the process, assumes a number of roles and responsibilities within the classroom – starting with the construction of the course itself through the execution of those course aims in a classroom setting, and even further. As such, questions related to the precise content of this rhetorical practice inevitably emerge. What, if any, are the topical points of obligation and the points of freedom for the teacher of rhetorical pedagogy? This question is more complicated than may initially seem to be the case, for the history of teaching rhetoric is lengthy, complex, and oftentimes divisive; thus, it warrants further attention and exploration.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 255 words || 
Info
3. Kakita, Hideki. "Praxis, Doxa and Rhetor as the Human Subject: A Rhetorical Critique of Liberal Humanism in the Scholarship of Rhetorical Studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256672_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The purpose of this essay is to critique an ideological conceptualization of rhetor as the agent of rhetorical practice. Against the backdrop of the academic controversy between the critical rhetoric and the close textual analysis, the essay will shed a critical light on Raymie McKerrow's version of the critical rhetoric from a standpoint of Michel Foucault. Enacting a critical reading of Michael Leff's understanding of rhetor (and its instrumentality) and McKerrow's (mis-)reading of Foucauldian subject, the essay discusses limits and possibilities of praxis, and problematizes the liberal humanism embedded as a doxa in both critical-rhetorical and textual-critical scholarships. The problem with the doxa of humanism is that it places rhetor as the center of rhetorical action, erroneously equating rhetorical agency, speaking subject, and human actor, while it is rhetoric itself that functions to constitute the subject. Interrogating into this problem requires a thoroughgoing assessment of the concept of agency in rhetorical practices, the limits and possibilities availed by liberalism, and the roles of critics within societies. The crucial question pertaining to contemporary rhetorical theory is how we can critique the neo-liberal ideology of the public. Departing from Hannah Arendt’s (and Habermas’) traditional notion of the public, Foucault’s analyses of power (along with Negri and Hardt) suggest a need for a new critical praxis in the neo-liberal public. The essay will eventually conclude that rhetorical practice without rhetor is in fact what Foucauldian critique should illuminate: the technological power of mediated discourse that constitutes the space of socio-cultural action.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 104 words || 
Info
4. Marinelli, Kevin. "From the Rhetorical Act to Rhetorical Acting: Parallels and Possibilities for Rhetorical and Acting Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419775_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since antiquity theorists and artists alike have driven a theoretical wedge between rhetoric and theater, the former ascribed to the realm of public deliberation and the latter to artistic expression. As scholars continue to push the limits of their disciplines, however, the boundaries between them continue to blur. Likewise, the purpose of this paper is to see how scholarship in each area may serve to inform one another. Centering on the work of Ernesto Grassi, I advocate a more performative view of rhetorical theory, as illustrated by several acting theorists, the goal of which is to provide new possibilities for theorizing the rhetorical situation.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 247 words || 
Info
5. Jowett, Adam. "Science, politics, religion and rhetoric: An examination of the rhetoric of conversion therapy advocates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253122_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In a 2014 Consensus Statement mental health professional bodies in the UK were united in speaking out against unethical ‘conversion therapies’ that seek to change clients’ sexual orientation. However there remain organisations and individuals in the UK that promote and defend the use of conversion therapies. This study seeks to examine the rhetoric used to justify conversion therapy by its advocates. Data is drawn from publicly accessible e-books published by a conservative Christian organisation in the UK that advocates the use of conversion therapy. The data were analysed using discourse analysis aligned with the discursive and rhetorical psychological perspective. Analysis demonstrates how conversion therapy advocates present themselves as defenders of commonplace principles. Authors of the e-books presented themselves as defenders of science and present the evidence as supporting their positions, contrary to what the scientific community say. Meanwhile professional bodies were presented as being driven by political ‘doctrine’. They thus use the rhetoric of science to present their position as objective while downplaying the importance of religion in their arguments. They also draw upon populist rhetoric by presenting themselves as fighting against an increasingly powerful and undemocratic political and social elite. Claims that conversion therapy is unethical are countered by drawing upon libertarian rhetoric to position themselves as defenders of therapeutic ‘choice’ and the client’s ‘right to decide’. While outwardly presenting themselves as ‘tolerant’ and respectful of diversity, the e-books often promulgate gay stereotypes and construct ‘the gay lifestyle’ as inherently harmful to its vulnerable target audience.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 525 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy