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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 135 words || 
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1. Manning, Jimmie. "'With This Ring I Do Thee Virgin': Virginity Rings, Balls, and Contracts as New Methods to Facilitate Discourse about Female Virginity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366263_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores changes in methods used to facilitate conversations between parents and children about sex and sexuality, particularly the preservation of their virginity. The researcher examined several texts, including virginity rings (rings worn by teenage women that serve as a promise to their parents that they will remain virgins until married), virginity balls (elaborate public dances where fathers take their daughters as dates and enact a public ceremony where daughters pledge pre-marital virginity to their fathers), and virginity contracts (contracts parents ask young teenage women sign promising their virginity until marriage). This investigation provided insight into the role parents and guardians are expected to play in their children’s sex and sexuality, including initiating sexual conversations and how virginity rings, balls, and contacts are being used to facilitate discourse between parents and children about sex.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 254 words || 
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2. Harris, Traci. "Where Freedom Rings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438716_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project examines the struggles of women of color in the South in and around their family. Centering women and their families in a political context of a white supremacist state allows me to examine the racial and gendered nature of the US and reveals permutations of liberatory action that women engage in to protect their families. This project constructs a new theoretical understanding of racial and illiberal spaces in the US, and examines how illiberal spaces in the US produce viable forms of racial contestation. I argue that Black women are not only central to the development of oppositional communities, the political implications of the work African American women are doing in illiberal spaces has the potential to extend to other subjugated communities. Examining the ways in which women of color consistently struggle against their placement in an illiberal political location presents a new way of thinking about the strategic nature of their political struggles. Specifically, I argue that the struggles of Black women for their families are sites that hold the potential for rethinking democratic action. By merging theory, history, and ethnography this project reveals how the lives of these women must be examined through an alternate theoretical lens. Doing so reveals a long history of women developing dual power strategies that challenge illiberal actions by the state. Furthermore, these women demonstrate how the family can potentially be a liberatory space, empowering for women, challenge racial and gender constructions, and provide a strategic model for political action.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 146 words || 
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3. Wojciehowski, Hannah. "Three Little Hermeneutic Circles and How They Grew: Reading Boccaccio's Parable of the Rings through the Religions of the Book" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481590_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The origins of Boccaccio's novella I.3 from the Decameron remain a subject of debate, though literary historians have proposed Christian, Jewish, and Islamic sources for the tale, including works by Stephen of Bourbon, Abraham Abulafia, Raymond Llull, Timothy the Nestorian Patriarch of Baghdad and the Caliph al-Madhi, and anonymous Persian storytellers. Indeed, the question of the tale's possible sources mirrors the problem of discernment presented by the tale itself. Without claiming to resolve the mystery, this talk will instead focus on the three religious hermeneutic traditions that circumscribe the tale, considering whether these interpretive models work in conjunction with or at cross purposes with each other. Moving over the 1300-year arc of this allegorical tale, the talk concludes with a set of reflections on the recovery and reframing of Islamic hermeneutics within contemporary Western literary and textual studies, alongside those of the Christian and Jewish traditions.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 148 words || 
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4. Migiel, Marilyn. "Running Rings around the Reader (Decameron 1.3)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481324_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: _Decameron_ I, 3, well known for its "tale of the three rings," has been considered key for understanding author-reader relations in the _Decameron_. It has also been hailed by some readers as an instrument that we can use to promote tolerance of multiculturalism and/or openness of communication. Questioning these views, I argue that the view of author-reader relations here is less rosy, and that the author of the _Decameron_ may be running rings around us. In my view, the story is constructed to pose a trap for the reader (just as the Sultan poses a trap for the Jew in the story), since, although the reader receives multiple and contradictory pieces of evidence, she is still encouraged by the narrator (and later by critics) to ignore problems and contradictions. My presentation will include materials I use in teaching this novella to first-year students, advanced undergraduates, and graduate students.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 65 words || 
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5. Hazzard-Donald, Katrina. "“Hoodoo Religion and American Dance Traditions: Rethinking the Ring Shout”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p560465_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: When one considers the history of American dance traditions one rarely thinks about its possible relationship to the local African American “Sanctified” or fundamentalist church described in works such as James Baldwin’s Go Tell it On the Mountain. This article examines the historical relationship between early African American slave worship and its contribution to both the social and theatrical dance traditions of the United States.

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