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2012 - BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL" Words: unavailable || 
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1. Snetkov, Aglaya. "The Rising Powers: rising but without agency" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL", Old Town district of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Scotland UK, Jun 20, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p599624_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2015 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 233 words || 
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2. Stier, Marc. "The Rise and Fall (and Rise?) of Communitarianism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 15, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p950373_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Three streams of thought came together to make communitarianism an important political tendency in the academy and beyond it. However, that tendency of thought is rarely heard from today.

Part I looks at the three streams of thought that gave rise to communitarianism—opposition within political theory to individualistic liberal theories; concern among political sociologist about the collapse of the civic spirit and civic capital of liberal democratic regimes; and fear among political activists that the post-war liberal ascendancy was being undermined by the new prominence of the “social” issues. The latter looked for a “third way” in politics that would overcome these disputes.

Part II of the paper looks critically at two liberal responses to the communitarian challenge. The first holds that the liberal individualist tradition had within it the resources to enhance the civic spirit of liberal regimes. The second repudiates communitarianism as an anti-liberal doctrine hostile to the liberation of minorities and women.

Part III of the paper explains the sudden collapse of interest in communitarianism. By 2000 liberals recognized that communitarianism issues were displaced by the key struggle of our time: defending liberal ideals and policies against right wing power

Part IV of the paper argues that communitarian concerns might once again rise if they are incorporated in a revived movement that explicitly attaches them to egalitarian economics and support for women, ethnic and racial minorities, and members of the LGBTQ community.

2016 - BEA Words: 112 words || 
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3. Tirumala, Lakshmi N.. "Blindsided: The rise, fall, and rise of narrative description for the visually impaired" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1093918_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Abstract: Video accessibility has typically been thought of in terms of video captioning, which provides text versions of a video’s dialogue and sound effects. Over the last thirty years, however, accessibility advocates have increasingly called for making video and film more accessible to audience members with vision disabilities through the use of video descriptions. The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Act (2010) required the FCC to put rules in place requiring broadcasters provide video descriptions for part of their programming. The current discussion will focus on the history of descriptive narration and accompanying regulations, factors involving in deciding what films and shows will undergo the process, and an examination of current trends.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 184 words || 
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4. Dennison, Susan., Lockwood, Krystal. and Clear, Todd. "The Rise and Rise of Incarceration of First Nations Peoples in Australia: Identifying the Causes, Reducing the Problem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148690_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite widespread acknowledgement of the need to reduce the mass incarceration of Australia’s First Nations peoples, efforts to date have been tokenistic, ineffective and at times, counter-productive. Even with a clear mandate to reduce the overrepresentation of First Nations peoples a quarter of a century ago, the rate of incarceration of Indigenous Australians has increased 84% over this time to the current rate of 2,253 per 100,000. This is unacceptable by any standards, but especially in contrast to that of non-Indigenous Australians (146 per 100,000) and in the context of mass incarceration in the United States (698 per 100,000). While reducing prisoner numbers is squarely on the US agenda, the over-representation of First Nations peoples in Australian prisons is a “wicked problem” lacking a clear reduction plan. In this paper we identify the multiple causes of the high rates of incarceration of First Nations peoples, including intergenerational disadvantage and disruptions to kinship, culture and communities. We advance a preliminary action plan for a combined policy and research response that addresses youth justice contacts, adult offending, sentencing and imprisonment, and the ongoing “churn” of incarceration.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 226 words || 
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5. Oketch, Moses. and Mutisya, Maurice. "The Rise and Rise of “Private Schools for the Poor”: Why and What Next?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634802_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract
The rise and rise of private schools for the poor in contexts of universal free primary education (FPE) policies has brought into sharp focus and heated debate, the extent to which such policies are pro-poor. Framed as EFA MDGs, there is no doubt that universal access policies were aimed at alleviating the educational challenges for those who were excluded due to fees, but it continues to baffle researchers when in contexts of free basic education, the very poor of the poor send their children to a form of school where they pay fees. Based on data collected longitudinally since 2002, comparing slum (poor) and non-slum (well-off) communities schooling patterns in Nairobi Kenya, this paper updates the Oketch et al (2010) paper which asked “why are there proportionately more poor pupils enrolled in non-states schools in urban Kenya in spite of FPE policy?”. This paper uses new data and goes into deeper analysis of the extent to which this is excess demand and not differentiated demand phenomenon. The driving hypothesis of this paper is that the poor would prefer state free universal education but given the limited government expenditure on their education, the FPE framework is problematic and remains a mirage for them. Private school for the poor debate can therefore be brought to rest- it is not a conundrum of FPE but a manifestation excess demand.

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