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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 15117 words || 
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1. Moon, Don. "Risk Considerations in Legalized Dispute Settlement (DS) Mechanisms: Risk Reduction, Risk Creation, Risk Management and the WTO DS System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65499_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why do states agree to establish legalized dispute resolution mechanisms? One of my arguments about the incentives of legalization is that states intend to reduce the risk/uncertainty involved in dispute settlement, and to increase the utility of dispute outcomes. This paper explores three aspects of risk/uncertainty problems that are related to the legalized dispute settlement (DS) mechanism of the WTO: risk reduction, risk creation, and risk management. Although existing studies have discussed risk/uncertainty problems in the context of international institutions, there has been no systemic analysis regarding the different aspects of risk/uncertainty problems and their relationships with international legalization.
The first argument in this paper is that states can reduce risk/uncertainty and increase utility by arranging their relations through international law. Focusing on dispute settlement mechanisms of the WTO, I contend that clarified substantive rules, well-established procedural rules, independent legal bodies, and legal precedents ?the four components of the legalized DS mechanism ?can reduce the risk/uncertainties involved in dispute resolution. As compared with the non-legal bargaining mechanisms of dispute resolution, the legalized DS system tends to produce dispute outcomes with narrow variations and smaller fluctuations. Assuming the risk-averse utility function of rational actors, we can understand how the legalized DS system improves utility among disputing states by reducing uncertainties.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7759 words || 
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2. Turner, Monique., Patel, Sejal., Boudewyns, Vanessa., Rimal, Rajiv. and Rains, Steve. "Extending the Risk Perception Attitude Framework: Does Priming Risk and Efficacy Predict Information Seeking For Those Not Initially At Risk?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490716_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Risk Perception Attitude framework, based on individuals’ risk perceptions and efficacy beliefs, formulates 4 groups which predict individuals’ information seeking behaviors. Participants read messages about indoor tanning in which levels of risk and efficacy were varied and were asked questions about perceived risk, efficacy beliefs, information seeking intentions and behavioral intentions. Participants were then given access to search for information online. The time spent surfing and number of websites visited were recorded using computer software. Finally, participants answered a follow-up questionnaire a week later. Results indicated the predicted pattern for behavioral intentions, intent to seek information, knowledge acquisition, and anxiety for tanners. Specifically, the avoidant group felt the most anxiety and acquired the least amount of information. The experiment did not have the same affect on non-tanners, indicating clear differences between tanners and non-tanners. Implications and future research ideas are presented.

2011 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1386 words || 
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3. Stimmler, Mary Kate. "Comfort in Numbers: Risk Management, Risk Measurement, and Risk Taking in Finance, 1994-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, Madrid, Spain, Jun 23, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498049_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the unintended consequences of modern risk management on risk taking within finance. The paper demonstrates, using a unique data set the charts the use of risk-based measurement and risk management rhetoric within annual reports of US banks from 1994-2007, the firms became more risk-seeking after adopting sophisticated risk measures and risk management logics. This paper argues that the risk management logic, widely adopted within American finance, centered on the belief that risk that could be measured did not need to be avoided, but could be profitably "managed." At the same time, the proliferation of new risk measures expanded the kinds of risks that could be quantified, therefore pushing the boundary of what kinds of risk could be managed. This paper demonstrates the recursive relationship between logics (the belief the measured risks could be profitable) and technologies (the financial modeling that enabled greater measurement) and shows that there are effects are conditional upon each other.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
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4. Boppre, Breanna., Salisbury, Emily., Miethe, Terance. and Van Voorhis, Patricia. "Re-conceptualizing Women’s Risk for Recidivism: A Conjunctive Analysis of the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment (WRNA) to Identify Risk Profiles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1146615_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Conjunctive Analysis of Case Configurations (CACC) is a relatively new data analysis technique, used compare the relative presence or absence of attributes in relation to an expected outcome. Although the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment (WRNA) has been validated for its predictive validity in assessing women’s risk for recidivism using traditional data analyses, no studies to date have looked at risk factors from a contextual perspective. A strength of using conjunctive analysis to examine risk for recidivism among justice-involved women is the ability to identify how certain factors interact to create high-risk or low-risk profiles. The current study uses CACC to examine risk profiles among 404 incarcerated women within 30-days of release from three states, Ohio (N= 172), Missouri (N = 195) and Kentucky (N = 37), who were administered the WRNA pre-release assessment. Six and twelve-month follow-up recidivism data were also collected. First, we assess how the relative odds of recidivism are affected by risk factors using logistic regression. Second, risk factors were analyzed by configurations in relation to recidivism outcomes, creating risk profiles. It is anticipated that certain configurations of criminogenic needs will be related to increased risk of recidivism. Theoretical, methodological, and practical implications will be discussed.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
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5. Ricciardelli, Rose. and Power, Nicole. "Risk it Out, Risk it Out: Occupational Risk in Rural and Remote Policing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1150206_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Policing is widely recognized as a ‘high-risk occupation.’ Researchers have found that officers’ experience varied forms of occupational stress as well as work-related health and safety risks. Risk however, we argue, changes shape in rural and remote areas as, for example, officers may not be able to call for backup in places without cellular reception and they must navigate inclement weather on rural roads and police vast geographical areas. Risk then, although the result of institutional and organizational structures, must be re-contextualized in the rural context. In the current study, we contextualize understandings of risk, which we operationalize as a lack of safety shaped by either a physical, administrative, legal or emotional feeling of vulnerability—or a combination of such—that results from occupational experiences. We draw on data from 14 focus groups with over 45 officers across ranks to reveal what they view as risky in their occupational role (e.g., practices, human and material resource strain), and break down these activities to show how they understand and contextualize risk. Finally, we focus on how the risk of their occupation shapes their occupational role and well-being. Theories of ‘risk society’ and everyday risk frame our findings and policy implications are presented.

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