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2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 85 words || 
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1. Calhoun II, Daron L.. "The Politics of Philanthropy: John D. Rockefeller, Sr., the General Education Board and the Naming of Morehouse College, 1012-1913" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574118_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: The Politics of Philanthropy” will examine the politics of paternalism with reference to black schools in general and Morehouse College (Atlanta Baptist College until 1913) in particular in the early twentieth century. The core of this paper will show how “the art of compromise” involving whites (General Education Board and the American Baptist Home Mission Society” and blacks (Missionary Baptists and prominent African-Americans) resulted in the changing of the name of the school for Henry Lyman Morehouse, a European-American, a longtime supporter of the school.

2012 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 506 words || 
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2. Reddy, Sujani. "Nursing Globalization: The Rockefeller Foundation, Global Biomedicine, and the Limits of Decolonization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Puerto Rico Convention Center and the Caribe Hilton., San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p569631_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: This paper is driven by the question of decolonization. Specifically, what would it have meant to decolonize Indian nursing labor in 1947, when the Indian nation-state emerged from British colonial rule? At the time, Indian nurses worked in what was a stigmatized and stigmatizing, underpaid and undervalued occupation. Professional nursing, such as it existed in the new nation, was still the exclusive preserve of white nurses, whose leadership over the field was a product of the racialized hierarchies that had constituted colonial rule. However the time had clearly arrived for a changing of the guard. This happened slowly but surely as a selected group of Indians began accessing professional nursing’s international circuits. If at one time these had led their colonial predecessors to the Indian subcontinent, how they led Indians to metropolitan institutions, especially those in North America. There they earned the credentials that would, upon return, enable their ascension into India’s first generation of Indian nursing leaders. Their training also positioned them as key figures in the establishment of university-based (i.e. professional) nursing in India. None of this would have been possible without the “hidden hand” of the Rockefeller Foundation (RF). The most surface reason is that the foundation was absolutely instrumental in providing fellowships for Indian nurses to study abroad, and grants for the establishment of the earliest university-based nursing programs in India. But this is only the tip of the iceberg, for the RF had been the single largest source of capital for the development of medical science and education (including nursing) in the U.S. and around the world. Its global health work began at the end of World War I and took place in many of Britain’s colonies, making it one of the prime actors in a period marked by shifting imperial formations. By the time the foundation made its investments in Indian nursing, its priorities for medical and nursing education as well as public health had become hegemonic in the United States and dominant around the world. They thus became the mandate of international agencies, other corporate philanthropies, and the U.S. State Department – all at the onset of the Cold War and an era of American ascendancy. In this paper I focus on the RF’s work to argue that the establishment of professional nursing in India and among Indians marked a limit, not the accomplishment, of decolonization. I trace how its implementation in India prepared a pool of internationally mobile labor with ties to metropolitan markets (ideologically, institutionally, and sometimes individually), and conclude with an examination of how Indians entered the U.S. nursing workforce just as that workforce was emerging from a system of racialized segregation that had itself been heavily funded by the RF and its affiliates. This last point allows me to conclude with questions about how we might relate struggles for desegregation and decolonization within the processes constituting the continuity of capitalist imperialism over the course of the twentieth century.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 35 pages || Words: 12405 words || 
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3. Guilhot, Nicolas. "The Realist Counter-Enlightenment: The Rockefeller Foundation and the Search for a Theory of International Relations in the Social Science Era, 1945-1954" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180488_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: IR theory was developed after the Second World War in the context of the academic institutionalization of the social sciences. In reaction to its previous grounding in law and history, the study of international relations was to be a realistic and scientific analysis of power politics. The paper argues that, contrarily to the conventional historiography of the discipline, the articulation of a "theory" of international relations was a strategic move by political theorists to insulate the study of international politics from the behavioral sciences. Using unpublished material, it shows that the early circle of realist scholars who defined IR theory was actively assembled by the Rockefeller Foundation in an attempt at countering the liberal assumptions that guided the social sciences.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10970 words || 
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4. Skovajsa, Marek. "Too Thinly Spread? The Effects of the Rockefeller Foundation Funding on Czechoslovak Social Sciences, 1924-1948" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725956_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The role of the Rockefeller Foundation in sponsoring the growth of social sciences in the interwar period has been widely documented in the historiography of sociology in the United States and major Western European countries. This paper which is based on the archival documents from the Rockefeller Archive Center and Czech National Archive studies the influence of the RF on sociology and other social sciences in interwar Czechoslovakia. It is argued that RF funding was important given the relative lack of institutionalization of social sciences in Czechoslovakia, but it failed to achieve its principal objectives. The RF provided two forms of support: individual fellowships and grants for specific research projects awarded to institutions. The effects of fellowships are analyzed using the collective biography method applied by Christian Fleck to German-speaking fellows. The analysis of professional careers of Czechoslovak fellows demonstrates that the RF’s objective to promote empirical social research by supporting able individuals who would occupy influential academic positions in their country was thwarted by conservative academic climate and hostile political circumstances. The fellows produced some significant research work, but the country’s fledgling structures for the social sciences were too slow to develop. The RF grants for specific projects were awarded to the Czechoslovak Social Institute, and although they were small, the RF’s support played an important role as a symbolic asset which the partisans of empirical social research could use in their - unsuccessful, again - effort to enhance the organizational basis of social sciences.

2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 14597 words || 
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5. Hallahan, Kirk. "W.L. Mackenzie King: Rockefeller's Other Public Relations Counselor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112339_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study profiles William Lyon Mackenzie King's role as a counselor to John D. Rockefeller Jr. in the aftermath of the bitter 1913-1914 Colorado coal strike. Mackenzie King-not his more recognized counterpart, publicist Ivy Lee-provided many of the modern public relations ideas that Rockefeller eventually adopted to alleviate tensions and improve labor relations. These included the development of the Colorado Industrial Representation Plan, a prototype company union structure that was designed to facilitate employee communications. Mackenzie King, who later served 22 years as prime minister of Canada, also advised Rockefeller on a wide range of public relations activities, including testimony before government hearings, meetings with union leaders, community philanthropy in Colorado, and Rockefeller's historic visit to Colorado in September-October 1915.

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