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2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7488 words || 
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1. El-Toukhy, Sherine. and Brown, Jane. "Cultivating Romantic Fantasies? Exposure to Western Television and Perceptions of Romantic Relationships in Egypt" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404853_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the role television plays in cultivating romantic fantasies among young Egyptian women. Women who watched more television endorsed attitudes and perceptions consistent with typical portrayals of romantic relationships on Western television programs (traditional masculine and feminine ideals, strong beliefs that fate and destiny affect marriage, negative marriage expectations, less strict moral judgments of television characters engaging in pre-marital sex, and positive attitudes toward pre-marital sex).
Religion and family still matter, however. Women with strong religious beliefs and those with closer family supervision were less likely to be endorsing the Western view of romance. They expressed less belief in fate and destiny and more positive marriage expectations. They expressed stricter moral judgments of television characters engaging in pre-marital sex and more negative attitudes toward pre-marital sex, which are congruent with traditional cultural norms.
Special attention is given to the cultural context of Arab societies in explaining the results.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Lucas, Amy. "An Exploration of Adolescent Romantic Relationships and their Association with Young Adult Romantic Relationship Quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252622_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Are adolescent romantic relationships associated with romantic relationship quality in young adulthood? To answer this question, I first generate and describe latent classes of adolescents’ romantic relationship type, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). I then examine the association between the classes of adolescents’ romantic relationship type and romantic relationship quality in young adulthood. Results suggest that there are five classes of adolescent romantic relationship type: intense, affectionate, casual, multi-intense, and multi-varied. In addition, results indicate that the membership in the affectionate class has the most positive association with regard to romantic relationship quality in young adulthood, and that compared to membership in the affectionate class, membership in the two multiple classes have the most negative association with romantic relationship quality.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 7756 words || 
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3. Rehkoff, Raiza. "The Role of TV Viewing in Emotional Satisfaction: Romantic expectations and romantic TV" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Building on Segrin and Nabi (2002), this study examined possible associations between romantic TV content and romantic expectations (romantic beliefs and fantasy rumination) in individuals who are versus are not involved in committed romantic relationships. Participants were 415 undergraduates who completed self-administered questionnaires. Results revealed that exposure to romantic TV and seeking romantic fulfillment from TV were positive predictors for fantasy rumination, but not for romantic beliefs, whereas perceived realism of TV’s romantic portrayals was a positive predictor for romantic beliefs, but not for fantasy rumination. Additionally, romantic expectations were positively predicted by the strength of respondents’ romantic parasocial relationship with favorite TV characters or personalities. Associations among the main romantic TV variables in not committed and committed individuals separately showed similar patterns. However, perceived realism of TV’s romantic portrayals was a positive predictor of romantic beliefs only in committed individuals. Implications for these findings are discussed.

2007 - International Communication Association Words: 156 words || 
Info
4. Chernin, Ariel. and Fishbein, Martin. "The Association Between Adolescents’ Exposure to Romantic-Themed Media and the Endorsement of Unrealistic Beliefs About Romantic Relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172438_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Prior research suggests that unrealistic expectations for romantic relationships predict relationship dissatisfaction and marital discord. We know very little, however, about the potential sources of these expectations, among them the mass media. Using data from a survey of adolescents between the ages of 15 and 17, the present study examines the link between exposure to romantic-themed media content and beliefs in (1) the existence of soul-mates (2) the need for partners to intuitively sense each other’s needs and feelings. Participants reported the frequency with which they watched 75 television shows and read 30 magazines. For each media title, frequency of exposure was weighted by a “relationship content” score, a rating of the degree to which the show or magazine focuses on love, romance, and dating (as determined by an independent sample of college students). Results indicate that for both boys and girls greater exposure to romantic-themed media is positively associated with unrealistic beliefs about romantic relationships.

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