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Showing 1 through 5 of 79 records.
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2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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1. Brown, Cynthia. and Bohm, Robert. "Death Row Man: An Analysis of Florida's Male Death Row Inmates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432336_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The United States Supreme Court in Louisiana v. Kennedy (2008), reserved capital punishment for murderers. In fact, the death penalty is supposedly assigned to those who are not just murderers but the “worst of the worst” of human killers. Referred to as “monsters,” “freaks,” and other less than human names, offenders committing crimes sufficiently horrific to be eligible for the death sentence have been branded with identifying labels based on the public’s fear, shock, imagination and anecdotal evidence. In an effort to provide a more empirical depiction of the death row man, this study undertakes a review of data related to each of the approximate 400 male capital offenders on Florida’s death row as of December 31, 2009. Demographic data, institutional data and court data are summarized to complete descriptions of Florida’s death row inmates and craft a portrait of Florida’s death row man.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 150 words || 
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2. Westervelt, Saundra. and Cook, Kimberly. "Life after Death Row: Coping Strategies of Death Row Exonerees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32119_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We discuss the coping strategies used by death row exonerees as they attempt to reestablish relationships and rebuild community post-release. Drawing from the stigma management literature, we examine both the reactive and proactive strategies used by exonerees and the conditions under which these strategies are deployed. We also expand on Becker's notion of the "falsely accused deviant," noting those strategies unique to such a group. Findings are based on extensive interviews with death row exonerees over a two year period. The exonerees were identified from the "innocence list" kept by the Death Penalty Information Center. The participants vary by age, race/ethnicity, region of the country, years of time spent in prison, and years since release/exoneration. Post-release, the exonerees faced difficult obstacles and most often were provided for by their families, supporters, and attorneys. As exonerees, none were eligible for post-prison social services. Only one received monetary compensation from the state.

2011 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 124 words || 
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3. Martin, Andrew. "Pro Prob. Problem: Expected Number of Wins vs Expectation of Winning Two-in-a-Row" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, Lexington Convention Center, Lexington, KY, Aug 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522056_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: You will play three tennis games against your father and the club champion, alternating the games between them. The probability of winning against your father is high, but that against the club champion is low. If a special prize will go to you if you win two games in a row, will you have a better chance of winning that prize playing father-champ-father or champ-father-champ? This is Problem 2 of Frederick Mosteller’s classic "Fifty Challenging Problems in Probability with Solutions". I will present the solution. In addition, I will pursue the question of how many times greater is the likelihood of winning if you make the correct choice? Can it be twice as likely? Three times as likely? Is the sky the limit?

2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 141 words || 
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4. Gibbon, Nicole. ""Hitting the Wall" in Rowing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483627_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to establish the Gibbon effect. The Gibbon effect is the “hitting the wall” phenomena while competitively rowing a set distance. Data was taken from the University of Central Oklahoma’s women’s rowing team. The independent variables included distanced rowed (2000 meters v. 6000 meters) and training level (novice v. varsity). The dependent variable is the performance spike. The performance spike has two measurable qualities: intensity (speed divided by pace) and length of time spent in the spike. Data was analyzed using repeated measures MANOVA, discriminant analysis, and time series analyses to determine a significant difference between levels for each dependent variable. The Gibbon effect will occur in distances rowed and in training levels. Once the Gibbon effect has been identified, steps taken to prevent or eliminate this effect producing more competitive athletes and reducing athletic injury.

2013 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 253 words || 
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5. Gregory, Stephan. "The Tabulation of England. How the Social World Was Brought in Rows and Columns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668252_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Abstract: While sociologists have largely dwelt upon the social effects of mass media, they have made little effort to consider the specific media of social enquiry, such as the diverse techniques of retrieving, recording, transcribing or processing empirical data as well as the various procedures of evaluation and interpretation of the thus constituted ‘facts’. Even Science & Technology Studies which are so eager to demonstrate the social construction of virtually any knowledge have not made a larger attempt to explore the specific material and medial preconditions of sociological research. To examine the role of media practices in the constitution of sociological knowledge this paper chooses a historical approach. Starting from the assumption that processes of technical mediation are more visible in the beginnings of a science than in their state of maturity, it delves into the prehistory of sociological knowledge. From a genealogical viewpoint it becomes clear that the birth of a scientific knowledge about society in the 17th century is a birth from the spirit (or better: from the medium) of the table. Focussing on John Graunt’s Observations on the Bills of Mortality (1662) which is not only a book about tables but itself an eminent example of tabular thinking, this paper tries to explore the epistemological effects which are implied in the use of forms, lists, and tables. The problem addressed can be outlined by the question: What happens to the knowledge of the social world (and what happens to this world itself) when it is brought into a tabular grid?

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