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2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6224 words || 
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1. Kononova, Anastasia. "Attitudes of Russian students toward the United States: how “Russian Russians” differ from “Americanized Russians.”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191883_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A total of 87 Russian students were surveyed for this project. The first group included Russian students who had never been to America (“Russian Russians”); the second group consisted of Russian students who had visited the United States (“Americanized Russians”). “Americanized Russians” had a more positive general attitude toward the U.S. than "Russian Russians." The latter students had more limited knowledge of the United States than the former students.

2016 - ASEEES Convention Words: 95 words || 
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2. Bilenky, Serhiy. "From the Ancient and Holy Russian City to the Russian World, or Kyiv through the Prism of Russian National Myth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138567_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Today Kyiv is the capital and the largest city of Ukraine. For more than two years Ukraine’s capital has been attracting the attention of international media, first as the site of the popular Revolution against the Russian-backed corrupt government, then as the heart of a nation threatened by the neighboring power. Can history at least partially explain Kyiv’s current fortunes? In what follows I will attempt to trace the Russian claims to Kyiv from the nineteenth-century imperial myth of Kyiv as an ancient and holy Russian city to the contemporary concept of the “Russian World.”

2017 - ASEEES Convention Words: 239 words || 
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3. Neuendorf, Jill. "Examining the Identity of Ukrainians in Russian-Speaking Areas of Eastern Ukraine and Russians in Russian-Speaking Areas of Estonia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Nov 09, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1265496_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Narva, Estonia shares demographic and geographic similarities with Eastern Ukraine. Both areas are comprised of large Russian-speaking populations of various ethnicities, some of whom are Russian citizens. In order to learn more about the identity of Ukrainians who live in Russian-speaking areas of Eastern Ukraine and Russians in the Russian-speaking city of Narva and surrounding Ida-Viru County I researched these individuals’ language preference and identity. In particular, I wanted to find out with whom they identify most closely – Ukrainians, Russians, Estonians, Europeans or others, whether there is a connection between cultural identity and the language individuals speak at home, as well as whether or not there is a difference in cultural identification based on the respondents’ age (i.e. between individuals who grew up before or after the collapse of the Soviet Union). I conducted my research by using a questionnaire, which 20 individuals in each group completed. My results show that the identity of many Ukrainian citizens in the eastern part of Ukraine is shaped by both Ukrainian and Russian influences, and these individuals claim a dual identity (i.e. Ukrainian and Russian); however, a sense of Ukrainian identity in that area of the country is also slowly emerging. The identity of Russian speakers in Narva is shaped above all by their city, then by Estonia and only after that by Russia. Nevertheless, a new type of identity – namely, that of Estonian-Russians – is now appearing in Narva.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 98 words || 
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4. Kalb, Judith. "Russians as Greeks, Russians as Romans: Goals and Methods of Russian Classical Reception" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1017622_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: To what end have Russians over the course of several centuries claimed metaphorical ancestry from ancient Greece and Rome? And what specific resonances and uses do Greece and Rome respectively hold for a Russian audience, and during what time periods? This paper will discuss the enduring appeal and authority of both Greece and Rome for Russians through an overview of several key moments in Russian classical reception: eighteenth and early nineteenth-century translations of classical texts; nineteenth-century archaeology and scholarship relating to the classical world; and changing uses of classical tropes in early and then late twentieth-century Russian literature.

2012 - Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention Words: 66 words || 
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5. Vinkovetsky, Ilya. "Export-Import the Russian Imperial Way: The Russian-American Company, the Russian Imperial Navy, and the Flow of Products between Russia and China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561419_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The Russian-American Company made its profits by exporting North American furs to China and importing Chinese tea and other products to Russia. This export-import business depended on a complicated set of routes and relationships, which involved the Russian navy, Chinese merchants, Russian coachmen, Yakut porters, and other intermediaries. My paper will explore the routes and relationships that made possible the conduct of the RAC’s business.

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