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2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 194 words || 
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1. Fitzgerald, Robin. and Douglas, Heather. "Narrative Accounts of Domestic Violence: She Said, He Said, the Police Said" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148615_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The legal response to domestic violence (DV) has increasingly focused on civil domestic violence protection order legislation in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. Domestic violence protection orders (DVOs) are now the most common legal remedy sought by, or on behalf of, women experiencing DV in Australia. DVO applications are lodged by the victim, or on their behalf by the police, and include a detailed narrative of the most recent incident or threat of violence. Earlier research has pointed to important differences in the language used by actors in the criminal justice system to conform to informal norms of legal communication, in contrast to the language used by victims themselves. Using narrative analysis, this study investigates differences in how victims and police describe acts of domestic violence when lodging a DVO. The study is based on a sample of verbatim narratives from DVO applications lodged by or on behalf of a sample of male and female DVO petitioners in Brisbane, Australia. In addition to the differences in police and petitioner narratives, and resulting DVO outcomes, the findings highlight gender differences in how men and women represent the narrative of victimization.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 196 words || 
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2. Fitzgerald, Robin. and Douglas, Heather. ""He Said, She Said", the Police Said: Gendered Violence and Domestic Violence Protection Orders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p576718_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past two decades, domestic violence has been dealt with increasingly through civil protection order legislation rather than criminal law in the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia. In Australia, a ‘cross-application’ occurs when both partners seek protection orders against each other. There has been limited research on cross-applications despite concerns raised by domestic violence workers about recent increases in the volume of these orders, as well as their claims that female IPV victims are disproportionately negatively affected through the process. This paper analyses the use of the protection order scheme using over 300 pairs of cross-applications (over 600 court files) dealt with in Queensland magistrates courts. The paper will explore the involvement of police in such applications; the types of allegations made; the reasons alleged for the violence by men and women and how competing allegations are resolved by the civil protection order system. Understanding the context in which cross-applications are made by parties and are dealt with by the courts has implications for debates about the gendered nature of intimate partner violence as well as providing important information about the use of civil remedies to respond to and help end domestic violence.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 81 words || 
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3. Samuelson, Ryan. and Spohn, Cassia. "He Said, She Said: An Assessment of Victim/Offender Accounts of Sexual Assault" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270086_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Prior research has examined victim risk factors as well as offender history in explaining occurrences of sexual assault. There is a void in the literature concerning the contradiction or dissension between victim and offender accounts of sexual assault. This study examines Miami / Dade County Police Department reports of 135 sexual assault cases. Detailed case narratives are assessed to identify similarities in and differences between victim and offender accounts of sexual assaults involving strangers, acquaintances, and intimate partners.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 213 words || 
Info
4. Wangmann, Jane. "She Said… He Said…: Cross Applications in Domestic Violence Protection Order Proceedings in NSW" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236110_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since the 1970s there have been recurrent, often highly acrimonious, debates about whether men and women are equally violent in their intimate relationships. This debate has largely played out in the sociological literature. This paper explores the way in which these debates find themselves reflected in the civil protection order system operating in New South Wales (NSW), Australia through a case study exploration of cross applications (ie where both parties in an intimate relationship have applied for a protection order against each other). Drawing on field work (examining court files, conducting observations of court proceedings, and conducting in-depth interviews with women and key professionals in the legal system) this paper argues that a narrow incident approach of domestic violence continues to animate civil protection order processes. Yet it is precisely these civil protection order systems that were designed to address the key limitations of the criminal process, one of which was its incident driven focus. The narrative of domestic violence that is articulated in the complaints for civil protection orders examined in the study represent narrow limited accounts of domestic violence. The data illustrates the way in which we need to know more than simply who did what to whom, and investigate the context and meaning of the acts that have been perpetrated.

2012 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 487 words || 
Info
5. Oropeza, Lorena. "He Said, She Said, But Who’s Right?: Oral History Unlocks Anti-Colonialism in 1960s New Mexico" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Puerto Rico Convention Center and the Caribe Hilton., San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570229_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Nearly concurrent with the emergence of the field of oral history emerged the persistent criticism that, because memory is often fallible, oral history interviews are an inferior source of information. The passage of time, the criticism goes, inevitably has the potential to cloud and even alter memories. That criticism is only magnified when memories directly collide. Under such messy circumstances, what value can oral history practitioners ascribe to oral history interviews in terms of understanding “what really happened”?
This paper argues that the answer is “a lot.” While a profusion of recent works champion oral history as a means of investigating how people remember and misremember, this presentation seeks to re-establish the utility of oral history in compiling an accurate record of the past. It argues, furthermore, that the utility of oral history remains – and indeed may be compounded – under the messiest of circumstances, when memories directly collide, when interviews are ridden with ethical dilemmas, and even when the stories told are so disturbing that they seem only to be relevant in their capacity to ruin reputations and turn stomachs.
To make this case, I turn to my research on the land-grant movement in New Mexico, specifically my efforts to compile a history of an organization originally called la Alianza Federal de Mercedes, the Federal Alliance of Land Grants, founded in 1963. In 1967, the leader of the Alianza catapulted to the national stage when he led an armed raid on the Río Arriba County Courthouse in the tiny town of Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico. The dramatic confrontation brought unprecedented attention to long-standing complaints of nuevomexicanos that they had been robbed of their land in the decades following the American conquest of 1846. It also secured Reies López Tijerina’s place among the pantheon of Chicano movement heroes.
Yet oral histories that I have conducted with members of the family of Reies López Tijerina, the organization’s leader, complicate that heroic narrative. To his credit, Tijerina developed an anti-colonial critique of U.S. westward expansion that directly linked the contemporary poverty of nuevomexicanos to the legacy of conquest. At the same time, oral history interviews with his first wife and children included allegations of physical violence and sexual molestation. I also interviewed Tijerina, who denied everything. While some might argue that what happened privately amongst Tijerina family members has little to do with this land-grant crusade that so deliberately took place in the public arena, this presentation counters that this information is central to the Tijerina story and to the story of the Alianza. The Alianza was essentially a family operation. Tijerina operated as a patriarch at home and as a land-grant leader. Thus, while filled with conflicting versions of the past, with moral concerns, and with cringe-inducing information, these interviews, despite their inherent limitations, also reveal critical and heretofore undisclosed information about the formation and eventual collapse of what amounted to an anti-colonial movement within the continental United States.

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