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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 5129 words || 
Info
1. Sherlock, Basil. "The Projected Growth of a Coastal Megalopolis between San Diego and San Francisco: 1850 - 2040" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108770_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Projected Growth of a Coastal Megalopolis from
San Diego to San Francisco

Basil J.Sherlock, Ph.D. Department of Sociology *
And
William B. Bergesen, M.A. A.L.S.S. Computer Laboratories **
California State University, Hayward

Abstract
From 1769 to 1823, a chain of Spanish Mission settlements colonized coastal California from San Diego to the San Francisco Bay Region. Twenty-one Franciscan missions were the primary agency of Spanish colonization. And when Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1833, California became a frontier province of very large cattle ranches established on former Mission lands. But when California entered the Union in 1850, after the war between the United States and Mexico ended, the Hispanic ranching economy and the Hacienda society which evolved with it, was eclipsed as a result of the discovery of gold in the central foothills of the Sierra’s. The Gold Rush boom beginning in 1849 became only the first in a series of immigration surges that came to California.

This report focuses on past and projected trends in population densities of California’s fifty-eight counties and five geo-historic regions. Decennial censuses from statehood in 1850 to 2000 were used to derive past population densities to chart the long-term course of California’s urbanization. These past trends in California’s population densities were then extrapolated from Rand Corporation population projections of future Decennial census results of 2000, 2010, 2020, 2030 and 2040.
Projections of population densities to 2040 suggest the full emergence of a pacific coastal megalopolis of ‘Colonial Coast’ counties from San Diego to the San Francisco Bay Region. By the middle of this century, a second wing along Central Valley may be expected. California provides an arresting example of when and where geographic spaces are distributed to the residential land usage and transportation corridors involved in the processes known as ‘urbanization’.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 114 words || 
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2. Baroncini, Rodolfo. ""In Merzaria”: The Gardano Firm’s Socio-Anthropological Context within the San Salvador and San Zulian Districts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p753545_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The paper reconstructs the complex economic and social reality of the two Venetian districts of San Salvador and San Zulian within which snaked the "Merzarie" (Mercerie), the main commercial street of Venice. It is here that the brothers Angelo and Matteo Gardano, the most important music publishers of the second half of the sixteenth century (1580-1610), had established their own bookstore (“libraria”) and printing house at the banner of the “Bear and Lion.” Following a path that moves gradually from the immateriality of the music to the materiality of socio-economic relations, this study analyzes, in an attempt to uncover its logic, the complex and seemingly contradictory system of relationships created by the Gardano brothers.

2007 - International Communication Association Words: 1 words || 
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3. Muria, Magali. "University of California, San Diego “How Do We See Our Neighbors to the North? The Representation of San Diego in the Tijuana Press”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173466_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper

2004 - American Sociological Association Words: 45 words || 
Info
4. Ferreira, Jason. "Medicine of Memory: Third World Radicalism in San Francisco and the Politics of Multiracial Unity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111207_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session explores how young people in the Bay Area are experiencing its racial and cultural diversity and what new identities, networks and political movements they are developing. Panelists will speak from a range of perspectives--academic research, grassroots activism and advocacy, and divergent life experiences.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6448 words || 
Info
5. Niyogi, Sanghamitra. "Culturally Correct: Identity Construction by Bengali Immigrants in the San Francisco Bay Area" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177146_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract: In this paper, I present an empirical analysis of the cultural activities of a particular group of upper-middle class immigrants of color. I apply the notion of boundary work to immigrants in the multi-faceted context of the San Francisco bay area where they might give salience to differing and contradictory criteria for status depending on the multiple cultural repertoires available to draw from. Based on participant observation and in-depth interviews, I find that Bengali immigrants, in the face of racialization and internal differentiation, construct immigrant cultural capital by fusing “tolerant” multi-cultural (Bryson, 1999) and “exclusive” ethnic cultural capital (Carter, 2003). I argue that segmented assimilation, currently, the most influential theory on immigrant identity, fails to elucidate how racial formation in the U.S. impacts upon highly skilled, non-white immigrants who identify ethnically but are not based in an ethnic enclave. My findings display that scholars of immigrant identity need to acknowledge the role of multidimensional cultural capital in adaptation and identification processes.

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