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2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 44 words || 
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1. Alsahil, Asma. and alageel, Amani. "Study Abroad Saudi Students’ Presentation of the self: Identity on Facebook Group Page, “Saudis in USA”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p963147_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation explores the Internet-mediated identity of study-abroad Saudi students on a Facebook group page, “Saudis in USA”. Using discourse analysis and multimodal discourse analysis, the presentation will present an analysis of students’ online discourse including the regular posts, shared images, and their comments.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 1 pages || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Itzkowitz Shifrinson, Joshua. and Priebe, Miranda. "How Secure is Saudi Oil? An Analysis of a Worst-Case Attack on Saudi Oil Infrastructure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414293_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Economic and political analysts voice concern over the physical security of world oil supplies. Few analyses, however, explicitly evaluate military vulnerabilities in oil infrastructure and the capacity of hostile actors to disrupt the free-flow of oil.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 690 words || 
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3. Phillips, Jacque. and Conroy, Paula. "Transformation: Saudi Teacher Preparation in an IB International School in Saudi" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p993305_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Transformation: Saudi Teacher Preparation in an IB International School in Saudi
The Teacher Development Program (TDP) for Saudi interns demonstrates social transformation. The TDP was implemented in 2012. In May, 2014, the first 3 Saudi interns graduated and were hired to teach. This paper examines the effectiveness of the program.
Purpose:
It is critical, for the future of Saudi Arabia, to have highly qualified teachers. Teacher preparation in Saudi Arabia has not resulted in appropriate levels of student achievement. There is a shortage of qualified Saudi teachers to teach in IB (International Baccalaureate) international schools. Saudi national policy encourages hiring Saudi employees as the current workforce is dominated by non-Saudis. Thus, the TDP was created to implement best practice in teacher preparation which results in Saudization, student achievement, and intern empowerment (particularly for Saudi women). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the on-going TDP.
Components:
The TDP is a 2 year intern program where young Saudis are recruited to live at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). This compound has 6000 residents from over 50 different countries. The children of graduate students and employees attend The KAUST School (TKS) which strives to provide a world-class education for the children of the community. The Saudi interns are at TKS where they are mentored daily in the pre-K-12 IB international school. The school is fully inclusive and gender-mixed. For the interns, it is their first experience in an IB international school.
Components of the program include mentor teachers, weekly graduate level courses, English instruction, IB training throughout the year, and International Teaching Certificate courses in the summer. Candidates for the TDP must have degrees in education prior to arriving. They participate in leadership activities including multiple presentations and trainings for local teachers. They are expected to lead the way in Saudi Arabia for effective teaching.
Main Perspective
A review of the literature, mostly from Saudi Arabia, indicates the need for improved teacher preparation. The Saudi Ministry of Education is putting more focus on increasing the professional development of teachers (Sabah, Fayez, Alshamrani, Mansour, 2014). However, research indicates that the current top-down approach directed by the Saudi Ministry of Education, with one-shot training being delivered by unprepared trainers is ineffective. Teachers have limited opportunities for reflective practice that would advance their professional development (Sabah, et. Al, 2014).
Compared to other countries, there is a lack of professional development for Saudi teachers (Shannag, Tairab, Dodeen and Abdel-Fattah, 2013). The schools center around Islamic Studies and genders are separated. Rote memorization is the main teaching method used (Rugh, 2002, Prokop, 2003). On the other hand, IB schools are inquiry-based and encourage risk-taking and open-mindedness.
Research Design:
This paper examines the effectiveness of the TDP by asking: 1) how the program is effective, 2) how students benefit and 3) how the Saudi interns benefit.
Evidence:
Data was collected through evaluations, surveys, interviews and artifacts (e.g., unsolicited emails from parents, videos of teaching). Responses were coded and themes emerged.
Conclusions:
Saudi interns discuss the cultural differences in being mentored and participating in the work force. Principals talk about why the TDP graduates are their best teachers. And parents tell why they want their kids in a class being taught by a TDP graduate. Interns discuss the factors that led to their success. The TDP is in a unique environment and is the only teacher preparation program of its kind. Beyond teaching, the TDP is social transformation in action. It is the first time non-Saudi teachers are working side-by-side for 2 years to train Saudi teachers. The cultural challenges are extensive and will be presented.
Significance to International Education:
Three Saudi women who graduated from the TDP in May 2014 are teaching in an IB International school. There are 4 more interns currently in the TDP. These are the first Saudis ever to be trained in an IB international school for 2 years before being hired.
When they attend trainings they are often told they are the first Saudis to attend. When they do presentations with non-Saudi teachers from KAUST, they are told by audience members that they have never seen Saudi and non-Saudi collaborate. This is transformation.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 42 words || 
Info
4. Jones, Toby. "Saudi Arabia's Sectarian Turn: 1979 and the Origins of Modern Sectarianism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p311455_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In November 1979 thousands of Saudi Shiis took to the streets in violent protest against Saudi oppression. The uprising was the result of decades of disillusion with the Shi'is' status as second-class citizens in the kingdom. Inspired in part by Iran's re

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 19 pages || Words: 6239 words || 
Info
5. Viden, Anna. "The Role of the Saudi Propagation of Wahhabism within the US Cold War Policy of Containment: A Pursuit of Realism or a Misperception?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p311382_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The post 9/11 debate has presented Saudi Arabia and its religious-political identity and strategy of proselytizing as key explanatory factors, both of homegrown extremism and of Sunni extremism. Few scholarly works have specifically focused on U.S. decision-making within the Cold War Policy of containment and Washington’s instrumentalization of Saudi propagation of Wahhabism within that framework. Due to the stigmatization of Arabs and Muslims within the War on Terror paradigm, and the emphasis on the role of Riyadh and Islamabad in the development of Sunni extremism, this paper makes a case for a more evenhanded research approach with regards to the genesis of Sunni extremism. This supposes a closer examination of U.S. decision-making, and of the perceptions and the images informing the decision-making process. This paper acknowledges that political Islam has undergone changes and influences that cannot be accounted for by Western influence. It argues however that the U.S.-Saudi-Pakistani partnership, which financed radical Sunni Islamist movements during the War in Afghanistan in an attempt to “roll-back” Soviet troops, have contributed to the development of “Sunni inspired extremism” This paper argues that the U.S. and its Saudi and Pakistani partners should therefore be seen as “enablers” of these movements.

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