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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 3212 words || 
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1. Koch, Thomas. and Obermaier, Magdalena. "Do You Say it Best, When You Say Nothing at All? Analyzing the Paradoxical Effects of Strong and Weak Arguments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p980195_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study analyzes effects of the (mutual) presentation of strong and weak arguments: research mostly relies on a “the more, the better”-heuristic and does not scrutinize whether it might be more effective to present only strong arguments instead of providing both weak and strong arguments. Results of an online experiment show that the presentation of weak arguments in favor of a political project reduces the persuasive effects of a strong argument. The paper also focuses on possible mechanisms to explain this effect. However, neither an averaging, nor reactance triggered by recognizing the persuasive intent explain this effect sufficiently. In addition, the study shows that the presentation of weak arguments lowers participants’ attitudes compared to presenting no arguments at all. This effect is based on both an averaging pattern and an intention to counterargue.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Words: 150 words || 
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2. Raitio, Kaisa. "“We Cannot Say Yes if We Are Not Allowed to Say No” – Containing Sámi Indigenous Rights Through Dialogue With the Mining Industry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1363887_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In this paper, I use the conflict between mineral extraction and Sámi indigenous rights to argue that the critical conceptualisation of dialogue as co-optation is on its own incomplete in capturing the mechanisms through which dialogue might be used strategically to discipline, rather than empower, communicative processes. The paper presents containment as a complementary orientation to dialogue. The three-part analytical framework grounded in Mouffe’s notion of agonistic pluralism looks at containment on the level of dialogue practices and their discursive and institutional context. Legal sources, policy documents and participatory observations of the conflict show that the Swedish government response to the conflict - dialogue between “the two industries” to find win-win solutions - contains rather than engenders democratic social change. Dialogue as containment captures the systemic and communicative stance of the state as a non-participant disciplining marginalized groups without co-opting them or attempting to persuade them to change their views.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 33 words || 
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3. Patterson, Molly. "What Just Happened Here? On the Problem of What to Say about Deliberation and How to Say It" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85423_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents an approach to conceptualizing and analyzing core dynamics of deliberation, with an emphasis on power and face-to-face citizen interaction. This approach is used to explore differences between various deliberative contexts.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7559 words || 
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4. Hill, Megan. and Holbert, R.. "It's Not Just What They Say, But How They Say It: The Matching Hypothesis and Fox News Personalities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483968_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent debates concerning the potential polarizing effects of ideologically-driven American cable TV news have focused on the messages being offered in this programming. The current research effort focuses on audience perceptions of how FOX cable TV news personalities communicate about politics (i.e., communication style), rather than what they are talking about or how they are framing various topics. The proposed matching hypothesis argues that audience proclivities for specific news personalities are determined in part by perceived connections with the communication styles of cable TV news personalities. The study also assesses how the matching of communication styles influences patterns of FOX cable TV news consumption using 2009-2010 survey data (N = 305) of a large Midwestern political battleground state.

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