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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10667 words || 
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1. Jung, Eura. "Elaborating Identity Gap Scale: Cross-Validation of Old Scale, Development of New Scale, and MTMM Analysis of Combined Scale of Old and New" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424357_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study attempted to develop an identity gap scale measured by multi-methods. In Study 1, the factor structure of the existing scale was tested by the cross-validation technique. A new scale was developed to diversify measuring methods Study 2. The Study 3 established the construct validity of the combined scale of the old and the new by MTMM analysis. In Study 4, moderation effects of valence of identity gaps was tested.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 956 words || 
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2. Nakano, Tsutomu (Tom). and White, Douglas. "The Large-Scale Strategic Network of a Tokyo Industrial District: Small-World, Scale-Free, or Depth Hierarchy?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The large-scale networks of suppliers and prime buyers in industrial districts have rarely if ever been studied as social networks, due to analytical complexity and rarity of such datasets. With a large relational dataset on buyer/supplier relationships among over 8,300 firms in a Tokyo industrial district, we analyzed the complex regional production system quantitatively so as to find its integration mechanisms. Tests of the small-world model―of local clustering, low average distance, lack of central hubs, and sparsity of connectivity―failed due to tendencies toward a power-law degree distribution, shorter-than-random average distances, and lack of local clustering. The scale-free network model was rejected because hubs in the network do not attract ties by supplier firms but actively organize their suppliers. We then explored an alternative explanation: Does the supplier-buyer network have layers as represented by a directed acyclic graph (DAG) or depth hierarchy where each link in a chain of suppliers and buyers is always directed up the hierarchy, never forming a directed transaction cycle? Controlling some data constraints, we found that acyclic depth partition can explain the structural properties of the network. Finally, we offer statistical evidence that the DAG should be a general property for the complex webs of supplier-prime buyer relationships in industrial production networks, as modeled by Harrison White, in lieu of small-world or scale-free network models.

2013 - Northeastern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9400 words || 
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3. Snook, Carl. "Measuring Supreme Court Decision-Making Utilizing Scaling Errors in a Cumulative Rating Scale" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Sonesta Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p678691_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project utilizes a cumulative rating scale to evaluate Supreme Court decision-making during the later Rehnquist Court era. After using the cumulative rating scale to examine the strength of a linear, uni-dimensional explanation for how the justices voted on the cases decided by the Court from 1994-2005 (a period with no membership change), the analysis will focus on two elements. First, the results of the scale will be tested to determine the correspondence between the scale and the perceived ideology of the justices. The second approach will look at the results that are not predicted by the scale: the so-called scaling errors. By looking for systematic explanations of those errors found in a scale that provides a strong overall explanation, it will be possible to provide further insight into theories of Supreme Court decision-making.

2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 235 words || 
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4. Pelot-Hobbs, Lydia. "Scaling Back or Scaling Up?: Tracking the Lessons of the Louisiana Carceral State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1016285_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In recent years, people across the political spectrum have been mobilizing against the reach of Louisiana’s penal regime through a series of overlapping and divergent frames from human rights to fiscal responsibility to racial and gender justice. Navigating this political terrain, while full of possibility, also raises questions of how to best confront the carceral state. Towards discerning how to proceed in this moment, I trace out another moment when the legitimacy of the Louisiana prison system was called into question: the 1970s. Throughout the decade, the state’s penal system was in a near constant state of crisis instigated by prisoner demands and underpinned by racialized political economic shifts locally and across the nation. With the question of overpopulation at the center of public debate, prison administrators, politicians, district attorneys, and activists, behind bars and free, put forth competing understandings of and potential solutions to the crisis. Within this context, state officials considered shuttering the notorious Louisiana State Penitentiary, AKA Angola, as part of a plan for a smaller, more decentralized state prison system. However, by the end of the decade, Louisiana was in the process of expanding Angola in tandem with building new state prisons on an unprecedented scale. I argue that examining this move from crisis and possibility to prison expansion and consolidation illuminates the material forces and accompanying contradictions antiprison activists were up against as well as the limits of their organizing.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 195 words || 
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5. Cikanek, Erin., McAlister, Kevin. and Shin, Hwayong. "Ordered Bayesian Aldrich-McKelvey Scaling: Improving Bias Correction on the Liberal-Conservative Scale" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1328879_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Bayesian implementation of Aldrich-McKelvey scaling as a way to correct the bias in survey responses due to differential-item functioning (DIF) on the liberal-conservative scale by Hare et al. (2015) improves the estimation of the positions of respondents and political stimuli.  By estimating parameters that vary across individuals when evaluating placement of stimuli on the liberal-conservative scale, Hare et al.’s (2015) contribution allows for the further evaluation of polarization in American politics. However, we propose that the measurement of the ideological scale can be further refined through a better specification of the scale as a categorical variable, which results in not only better but faster estimates than the continuous model used by Hare et al. (2015). We replicate Hare et al. (2015) and apply our methods to the 2004–2012 American National Election Studies and the 2010 Cooperative Congressional Election Study. Using a model comparison, our model outperforms the original model in terms of parameter convergence (success at convergence, speed of convergence) and latent variable prediction (posterior predictive distribution), as well as in sample proportional reduction in error. This allows us to reassess polarization among the American public due to differential item functioning in survey response.

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