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Showing 1 through 5 of 365 records.
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2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 7694 words || 
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1. Choi, Yun Jung. and Lee, Jong-Hyuk. "Relationship Between Central and Online Processing in Candidate Evaluation: The Effects of Scene Order and Scene Proportion in Broadcast News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172133_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The relationship between central and peripheral processing of ELM and online and memory-based processing of impression formation are examined with scene order and scene proportion of broadcast news stories. Contrary to common belief that central and online processing concur, the study found evidence of central and memory-based processing. Scenes shown at the beginning of a story determined people’s memory and attitudes about the political candidates shown in broadcast news, which indicates that people processed the information through the central route. SEM analyses show that people formed impression of candidates based on what they recalled from the story. The implication of the finding is discussed in the study.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 69 words || 
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2. Avdija, Avdi. "Police Response to Crime Scenes: Testing the Effect of the Number of Patrol Officers Responding to an Active Crime Scene on the Immediate Arrest Success Rates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148939_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using administrative data that were collected by the Phoenix Police Department, sponsored by the United States Department of Justice, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the number of first responders on the arrest success rates made immediately after their arrival at the crime scene. The types of cases analyzed in this study are homicides scenes. The analyses are based on 532 homicide investigative reports.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 9692 words || 
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3. Haunss, Sebastian. and Leach, Darcy. "Between Networks, Organizations, and Subcultures: The Role of Scenes in Social Movements and Civil Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p20748_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this article we introduce the concept of scenes and analyze the relationship be-tween social movements and movement scenes. We define a scene as a network of people who identify as part of a group and share a common set of beliefs and convic-tions, and which is centered around a particular location or set of locations. It is ar-gued that scenes, when attached to social movements, can serve to support and sus-tain movements by serving 1) as a mobilization pool for movement actions and dem-onstrations; 2) as a site for experimentation with alternative organizational struc-tures, decision-making processes, and modes of interaction; 3) as a social space for the construction of commitment frames and collective identities; and 4) as a set of “abeyance structures” that can preserve movement culture, ideals, and practices from one wave of mobilization to the next. We conclude with a discussion of the rele-vance of movement scenes for research on social movements and investigations into the nature of civil society and the relationship between associations and democracy. We argue that because movement scenes are likely to make a qualitatively different contribution to democracy than either non-scene related movements or traditional voluntary associations, they should be conceptualized as a distinct sector of civil so-ciety. Secondly, we argue that the nature of the relationship between movement and scene is an important factor mediating the democratic impact of social movements.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10791 words || 
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4. Lichterman, Paul. "The unhappy marriage of Tocqueville and social capital: Scenes from local volunteering" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19987_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Neo-Tocquevillians have conceived civic ties with a distinctive, widely diffusing concept of social capital developed by Robert Putnam. This paper argues that in research practice, “social capital” often turns Tocqueville's qualitative argument into a quantifiable argument about group ties, individual attitudes and behaviors, frustrating its own analytic intentions. By failing to grasp the varying meanings of social ties, and by imputing to civic groups a social capacity that some civic groups do not exercise, Putnam's social capital concept undercuts its Tocquevillian aspirations. The paper employs an alternative, one focused on the institutionalized customs of group life, that does the qualitative work that the social capital concept tries to do but can't. Empirical support for these critiques comes from ethnographic evidence on the customs of two, local, “plug-in” style volunteering projects. In these projects, volunteers sign up for time slots in programs organized by recruiters or social service professional; this style of civic activity is widespread in the U.S. Research here suggests that the institutionalized customs of volunteering often do not allow the pro-active pondering and planning that democratic, civic relationships require by definition. Tocqueville, read closely, offers insights that we still need for understanding civic limits as well as potentials.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6523 words || 
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5. Mullaney, Jamie. and Kolb, Caitlin. "Having the Edge or Edged Out? Women's Experiences in the Straight Edge Hardcore Music Scene" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103686_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines women’s experience in straight edge, a hardcore music scene with supposedly progressive tenets and a strong stance against sexism. Interviews with forty-seven straight edge women and men reveal that straight edgers believe gender bears little influence on how one experiences the scene despite their offered evidence to the contrary. We explain this discrepancy through four myths that permeate the scene, ultimately precluding women from embracing feminism and becoming full participants in the scene.

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