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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3551 words || 
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1. Smith, Kayla. and Hill, Patricia. "What is Science? Exploring Middle School Perceptions of the Nature of Science and Science Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1009847_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Understanding emerging adolescents’ ideas about the nature of science is imperative in promoting science enjoyment and the acquisition of a science identity. These are important predictors of persistence in STEM careers, and are also imperative to broadening participation among underrepresented minorities in STEM careers. In a study of 444 middle school aged students, a mixed methods approach was used to assess students' conceptions of ‘What is Science?’. Seventy-nine percent of the youth surveyed responded to this open ended question, and 29% of their 688 responses included a broad conception of science focused on discovery and inquiry. Bivariate results revealed that students with a broad, discovery oriented view of science had a higher science identity as well as science enjoyment.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8728 words || 
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2. Gauchat, Gordon. "Science Habitus and Science Capital: the Cultural Authority of Science in the Public Sphere" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410755_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper proposes that identifying cultural dispositions toward science and their consequences should represent a central theme in Science and Technology Studies and the related field of Public Understanding of Science. In short, this paper develops the concept of “science habitus,” which describes a privileged disposition/orientation toward science that encompasses (1) basic knowledge of scientific facts, (2) general trust in organized science, and (3) experiences in college level science courses. Consistent with Bourdieu’s notion of habitus, I argue that cultural dispositions toward science (science habitus) likely represent a symbolic dimension of social class, similar to cultural capital. First, I review how approaches in Science and Technology Studies have addressed the cultural authority of science (implicitly or explicitly) and, where these approaches are inadequate, how they might be further developed. Then, using data from the National Science Foundation’s Science Indictors Survey, I illustrate how Bourdieu’s concepts of habitus, capital, and field provide unique and underutilized tools for exploring public understanding of science.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2015 - 4S Annual Meeting – Denver Words: 247 words || 
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3. Sutherland, Tonia. "People Problems in Data Science: A Case Study from the Intersection of the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Humanities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting – Denver, Sheraton Downtown, Denver, CO, <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1035011_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Abstract: The Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis (CHIA) is a global data aggregation and archiving project, which aims to collocate and link massive amounts of data from the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities; allow researchers to identify new patterns from analyzing large-scale aggregated datasets; and provide for the long-term preservation of historical data from 1500 to the present, consolidating and augmenting pre-existing fields of knowledge production. Members of this transnational collaborative include the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University; the Great Britain Historical GIS Project at the University of Portsmouth; the International Institute for Social History in the Netherlands; the Department of History at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar, Sénégal; and several US colleges and universities including Boston University, Michigan State University, the University of California, Merced and the University of Pittsburgh. A wide range of tools for communication and collaboration have been discussed in the STS literature, nonetheless communication and collaboration among heterogeneous communities continues to be a challenge. This paper explores people problems (issues of participation and engagement) in a transnational data project, highlighting the social infrastructures that underpin CHIA as a scholarly collective. The paper aims to unpack multiple perspectives on the challenges of and opportunities for multi-national, cross-disciplinary knowledge exchange in a quantitative research culture. Finally, the paper offers a reflective analysis of the author’s former role within the Collaborative: the lead researcher who was responsible for creating and defining policies and practices for curation, communication, storytelling, and visualization.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 101 words || 
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4. Parent, Nancy. "Whose Science?: Master Narratives of Science and Science Learning in Contemporary Native American Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, Nov 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512950_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will analyze constructions of science and science learning within and among the Zuni Nation in New Mexico and the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation in Connecticut based on an empirical study of a National Science Foundation grant titled “Archaeology Pathways for Native Learners” (grant #0307858). Hosted by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center from 2004-2007, this grant sought to engage middle-school age Native and non-Native youth in informal science learning through archaeology. This paper will focus on the evaluation methodologies constructed by the consulting firm for Zuni and Mashantucket, and conclusions drawn about student learning through those partnerships.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Bentley, Michael. "Feynman’s Lecture to U.S. Science Teachers on “What Is Science” and Today’s Mistrust of Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169143_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Richard Feynman keynoted the 1966 NSTA convention, addressing, “What Is Science,” and speculating on student misunderstandings. More than what you think, how you think matters. Yet public trust in scientists has been decreasing. Why?

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