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2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Jahng, Mi. and Lee, Namyeon. "When Scientists Tweet for Social Changes: Dialogic Communication and Collective Mobilization Strategies by Flint Water Study Scientists on Twitter" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1227398_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Guided by the literature in social media and science-activism, this exploratory study examined how scientists from Virginia Tech University’s Flint Water Study utilized Twitter to communicate and mobilize the public in response to the contamination of water with lead in Flint, Michigan. The results of content analysis indicate that Flint Water Study scientists utilized social media mainly to provide scientific information to the public, making public education their main mobilization strategy on Twitter. This study offers the first insights into how science-activists utilize social media for collective actions.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 263 words || 
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2. zhang, xiao. "It’s Time for Scientists to E-volve: Scientists’ Engagement in Online Public Science Communication of GMO issue in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1271458_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Online environments are providing audiences with great opportunities to connect with science, but social scientists are only beginning to understand the nature of these connections and their potential outcomes on science communication. There are relatively little empirical research on representations of science in social media, and especially scientists and their roles. I did a simple investigation on Chinese most famous social media—weibo.com and found diverse information sources but absence of scientific community.
In my opinion, the goal of science communication shall not only refer to equal and extensive dialogues, or "information" form of scientific dissemination like on traditional media, but also "network” form of science communication on social media. Science communication is not only “information” that we sent, but also message, perspective or habit that lay people truly receive. Collaboration between scientists and communicators (including laypersons) on evidence-based field experiments is the best means of communicating science, especially scientists and media as the core. This study aims to explore how Chinese scientists have been participating in online science communication process regards to GM issue, and rethink the role of scientists and reasonable strategies. Basically, I will do content analysis of the network, habit and content of scientists’ online science communication process of GMO issue during a specific time period on several typical online Chinese science communication sources, including blogs, website, microblog and video website. Then I will interview some scientists about their perceptions of GM, science communication and new media engagement.
This study is expected to contribute to empirical studies of online public science communication in China, figuring out reasons, new practice and possibilities.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Ecklund, Elaine., Johnson, David., Scheitle, Christopher., Matthews, Kirstin., Lewis, Steven. and Di, Di. "Religion among Scientists in International Context: A New Cross-national Study of Scientists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1121968_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In eight regions around the world—France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States—with differing degrees of religiosity, varying levels of scientific infrastructure, and unique relationships between religious and state institutions—we examined how junior and senior biologists and physicists at top universities and research institutes approach religion. We created an overall sampling frame of 61,020 biologists and physicists and surveyed 22,525 of these scientists, of which 9,422 responded. We followed up with a subset of scientists to carry out 609 in-depth qualitative interviews. We have determined how scientists in different national contexts understand the relationship of science and religion, and how religion influences their research agendas, daily interactions with students, and ethical decisions and discussions. We find that, in most of the national contexts studied, scientists are indeed more secular—in terms of beliefs and practices—than the general population. We also find that scientists do not think science is a secularizing influence; instead, most think religion and science operate in separate spheres. Yet, for scientists in all nations—even the most secular—there are specific ways in which religion and science overlap. In each country, there are specific areas where the scientific community does conflict with local religious communities, especially in national contexts where an influx of immigrants introduces more traditional forms of religion. And in countries at the core of the global science infrastructure, science and religion overlap when religious scientists from non-western countries migrate to advance their careers.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 7987 words || 
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4. Yuan, Shupei. "A Comparison between Scientists’ and Communication Scholars’ Views about Scientists’ Engagement with the Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1281514_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study aims to investigate the potential disconnections between scientists and communication scholars’ understandings of topics related to scientists’ public engagement. We conducted a survey with authors from five journals representative of the field of science, health, environment and risk communication, and a survey with scientists from three prominent science societies. The results from comparing responses from scientists in the three societies (N=307, 373, 372) and communication scholars (N=362) showed that communication scholars expected more engagement participation from scientists than what scientists actually did, and find fewer efficacies in scientists’ engagement behavior, but more influence from scientists’ normative belief. Other factors, such as science communication objectives, were also compared. The findings address gaps in science communication research findings and practices, and provide implications for future science communication training such as shifting the emphasis of the training focus.

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