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2007 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 100 words || 
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1. Larsen, Amy. "The Homemaker: Social Roles and Identity in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Mrs. Sen’s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, TBA, St. Charles, IL, Pheasant Run, Jun 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p169954_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Identity is a continuous construction of how one construes oneself in the present, past, and future. Gender, familial, and socioeconomic roles interact to form one’s identity. Collectivist cultures, which stress strong in-group identification, encourage allocentrism. When allocentric individuals immigrate to a more individualistic culture, they are more vulnerable to feelings of alienation and stress. Lahiri’s Mrs. Sen, who moved to New England for her husband’s career, misses her family in India. Without this group identification to define her, she struggles to translate customs, particularly gendered domestic practices, into American culture in an effort to find security in a stable role.

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 374 words || 
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2. Mukherji, S. Ani. "To Build an Anticolonial International: Katayama Sen, M.N. Roy, and Undoing of the Exclusion of Asian American Radicalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487898_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 enthused critics of empire around the world, as they witnessed a successful revolution led by V.I. Lenin, a Marxist renowned for his landmark study Imperialism as the Highest Stage of Capitalism. Among those attracted to Lenin’s anti-imperialist message were two Asian migrants living in the United States, Katayama Sen and Manabendranath Roy. Both of these migratory intellectuals had undergone major political and personal transformations during their American sojourns, and both faced political persecution during the First Red Scare, sending them into exile. Along with a number of American socialists, Katayama and Roy fled to Mexico, then in the wake of its own revolution, before taking up residence in Moscow where they began to move among the leading socialists and revolutionaries of the world as guests of the Communist International (Comintern). This paper considers the intellectual and political contributions of these two major anticolonial theorists who sought to translate Leninist theory into a specific set of political analyses, practices, and institutions in the early years of the Comintern. In Moscow, Roy was a consistent voice pushing forward an agenda of class-based struggle in the colonies as a priority for the Comintern. He worked to construct a university that would train colonial cadres and to connect the work of exiled revolutionaries in America and Europe with their “home countries.” Like Roy, Katayama also stressed the importance of work in the colonies and anti-racist work in the American South (where Katayama had attended Maryville College), producing a series of under-examined texts that reconsider the revolutionary possibilities among the colonized. One of his most remarkable analyses was the pamphlet "America and Japan," a work that deftly connects problems of foreign policy, migration, and empire. I argue that the efforts of these two anticolonialists were essential to incorporating a program of struggle against empire in the Communist International; furthermore, I contend that these men's experiences in the United States positioned them to undertake this task as they came to a more global understanding of migration, labor exploitation, racism, and colonial rule. Finally, I claim these migratory voices as exilic articulations of Asian American radicalism, attempting to “undo” their erasure by the exclusionary nation-state and to reconfigure our understandings of political space of Asian America.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 148 words || 
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3. Parker, Sarah. ""Le sens humain y perd son Latin": Medicine and the Problem of Categorizing Knowledge in Montaigne's Essais" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p480680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the final essay of the second book of his Essais, "De la resemblance des enfans aux peres," Montaigne specifically attacks medicine's claims to be a science capable of restoring the body to health. Though he finds affinities between his own writing style and the creation of medical knowledge insofar as it relies on experience and exemplary cases, he ultimately rejects medicine's claims to organize and understand the body. Rather than improving health, medicine in fact damages it by introducing categories that misunderstand the workings of the body and lead instead to disorder and sickness. Montaigne's critique of medicine raises questions about the Essais' approach to knowledge. Though he famously rejects the possibility of categorizing knowledge, he continually holds out hope for effective communication. This paper considers Montaigne's critique of medicine's use of categories as an avenue for clarifying his position towards communication, specifically the concept of distinguo.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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4. Candido, Igor. "Fabula aut historia: Boccaccio's Gen. XIV, 9 and Petrarch's Sen. XVII, 3–4" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525697_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In early 1373 Boccaccio presented Petrarch with a copy of his Decameron, to which work Petrarch would later admit to have devoted only cursory attention. He nonetheless dwelt long on the Centonovelle’s very last tale, the story of Griselda, so that he finally decided to translate it into Latin. The reasons behind such a surprising choice are to be found in two of his Senili (XVII, 3-4), that form, together with the attached Latin Griselda, a prehumanist treatise entitled De insigni obedientia et fide uxoria. But Petrarch’s text is a radical rewriting of the source tale rather than a faithful translation, as it turns its fabula into an exemplum that the good Christian should follow in order to achieve moral perfection. Did Petrarch’s predilection for historical verisimilitude misunderstand and so distort Boccaccio’s concept of fabula? What idea did he entertain of the "Griselda fable," the very apex of Boccaccio’s masterpiece?

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 164 words || 
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5. Awash, Beniam. "Amartya Sen's Developmental Discourse: From Theory to Policy Prescriptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179748_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Hannah Arendt opined that there could be nothing worse than a society of permanently redundant laborers. In the context of the three decades old global expansion of capital and markets the production of wealth has coincided with an equally dramatic expulsion of entire regions full of laborers from the global market. These latter constituting the ?losers? of late 20th century globalization exist in an informal sector that is unable to meet basic human needs. It is in this context that the moral philosopher and economist, Amartya Sen, has successfully interjected to translate his normative theoretical re-appropriation of development into the most widely accepted guide posts in formulating, implementation, and measuring international development. This article aims to investigate why Sen?s approach has been adopted by policy makers for, primarily, dealing with the economic marginalization of the Third World. In addition, the efficacy of Sen?s normative developmental discourse and the extent to which it offers a critical distance from the previously failed development models is investigated.

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