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Showing 1 through 5 of 230 records.
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2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 27 words || 
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1. Tisinger, Russ. "Saddam and September 11th: A Model for Predicting the Belief that Saddam Aided in the September 11th attacks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85346_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper draws on John Zaller's model of persuasion to help explain and predict the belief that Saddam Hussein aided in the attacks of September 11th, 2001.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 11 pages || Words: 2666 words || 
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2. Muller, Christine. "The Notion that the World Changed on September 11, 2001: Understanding September 11 and Its Aftermath through In-Class Simulation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500135_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The notion that the world changed on September 11, 2001 has been asserted and contested repeatedly and compellingly on a number of terms. But what might this mean? Precisely what has changed, for whom has it changed, and how? How would such a sensation, that the world has changed, matter to future choices and future action, even among those not intimately connected to that day and its aftereffects? This in-class simulation confronts such questions by helping students revisit the September 11 attacks as an originating incident with a diffuse, unfolding aftermath. Instructors assign students to one of six fictionalized groups that offer a sample of real-world groups’ particular kinds of interests and investments in what has happened on and after that day. Through their fictionalization, these groups can introduce students to the exigencies and options that real-world groups have faced without requiring them to conform in the simulation to the choices those real-world groups have actually made. This process is structured to demonstrate how complexly an initial act of terror both shapes and is shaped by subsequent events and the people who live through them. Ultimately, the simulation process aims to contribute insight into not only September 11, 2001 and its aftermath, but also the possible character and impact of other terrorist events of large scale and scope.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8646 words || 
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3. Hymans, Jacques. "International Relations, State Identity, and September 11" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66375_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that the literature on ?state identity? confuses two levels of that identity: identity as state self-differentiation from other states, and identity as state self-placement in the basic category of ?state.? Both levels of identity are meaningful, but the second level is meaningful only if we recognize that there are competitors to states for primacy in world politics?something most IR theory does not do. States? reaction to September 11 shows the value of the notion of states? identities as states, contrasted with other actors in world politics. The paper?s content analysis of UN General Assembly speeches shows that states generally did react to September 11 on the basis of their identity as states. According to identity theory, this reaction holds out the prospect for the development of a truly functional system of collective security. On the other hand, Arab states were much less likely to react in this way, and the reaction of the US also seems not to be conforming to this general pattern. This calls into question whether a collective security system is likely to come about.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 7801 words || 
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4. Gladstone-Sovell, Tracey. and Wilkerson, William. "Inclusion, Education, and Avoidance: The Prime Time Response to September 11" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66283_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is an initial examination of prime time television's response to the events of September 11. Based on a review of the 2001-2002 television season's prime time programs, we identify 15 programs that incorporated 9/11 elements. Themes of these programs are discussed as are the strategies for inclusion adopted by show producers and writers.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 4673 words || 
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5. Powers, Michael. and Lascher, Edward. "September 11 Victims, Random Events, and the Ethics of Compensation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64793_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The establishment of the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund raises the question of when the government should compensate those suffering losses in terrorist attacks and other disasters. We address that issue in this paper, offering standards that may be used to distinguish among events. We also apply these standards to a number of real world cases.

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